The Vietnam War Memorial

The Vietnam War Memorial, dedicated to the brave men and women who fought for freedom in southeast Asia under extreme conditions.

photo of Vietnam war memorial

The Vietnam War Memorial with the Washington monument in the background

The war became a political football, being run by Washington bureaucrats, instead of the military, it became a hopeless war

In spite of the rhetoric, because of what these brave men and women did, Vietnam is abetter place toady than it was before we became involved there.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

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EARLY PATRIOT WAS ‘PESSIMISTIC’ ABOUT AMERICAN EXPERIMENT

Many of our early patriots were skeptical as too how long the republic could last.

    

Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames

He sat next to George Washington in the pew at St. Paul’s Chapel in New York during the religious service following Washington’s presidential inauguration. He helped ratify the U.S. Constitution. His name was Fisher Ames.

Fisher Ames was a Congressman from Massachusetts where, on Aug. 20, 1789, he proposed as the wording of the First Amendment (Annals of Congress, 1:766): “Congress shall make no law establishing religion, or to prevent the free exercise thereof, or to infringe the rights of conscience.”

Fisher Ames contrasted monarchy with a republic (Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Essays,” Second Series, chp. 7– “Politics,” 1844, p. 97; Library of America, 1983): “Monarchy is a merchantman, which sails well, but will sometimes strike on a rock, and go to the bottom; whilst a republic is a raft, which would never sink, but then your feet are always in water.”

Of America’s republic, Fisher Ames wrote an article titled “Monitor,” published in the New England Palladium of Boston, 1804 (Works of Fisher Ames, compiled by a number of his friends, Boston: T.B. Wait & Co., 1809, p. 272): “We now set out with our experimental project, exactly where Rome failed with hers. We now begin, where she ended.”

Warning against the temptation to increase government, Fisher Ames stated in “Speeches on Mr. Madison’s Resolutions” (“Works of Fisher Ames,” compiled by a number of his friends, Boston: T.B. Wait & Co., 1809, p. 48): “To control trade by law, instead of leaving it to the better management of the merchants … (is) to play the tyrant in the counting house, and in directing the private expenses of our citizens, are employments equally unworthy of discussion.”

At the Massachusetts Convention, Jan. 15, 1788, Fisher Ames warned that democracy without morals would eventually reduce the nation to the basest of human passions, swallowing freedom: “A democracy is a volcano which conceals the fiery materials of its own destruction.”

Fisher Ames commented in “The Dangers of American Liberty,” 1805 (published in “Works of Fisher Ames: with a selection from his speeches and correspondence,” Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1854, pp. 349): “The known propensity of a democracy is to licentiousness, which the ambitious call, and the ignorant believe to be, liberty.”

“Licentiousness” is defined as: sexually unrestrained; lascivious; libertine; lewd; unrestrained by law or general morality; lawless; immoral. … Synonyms: abandoned, profligate.

As Fisher Ames had predicted, the state he was a Congressman from, Massachusetts, has moved in the direction of licentiousness. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, in the 2003 case of Goodridge necessitated the state recognize same-sex marriage. Since then, the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender agenda has been taught in schools with sexually explicit materials. Those not embracing this agenda are discriminated against; employees fired; businesses sued; attorneys disbarred; hospitals made to provide sex change services; doctors exposing health risks are labeled; adoption agencies penalized; domestic violence increased; and churches demonized.

The freedoms of religion and speech have diminished for those holding biblical morals. It is as those who have come out of the closet are intent to shove others into it!

Russell Kirk described Fisher Ames in “The Conservative Mind: From Burke to Eliot” (Washington D.C.: Regnery Publishing, Inc., 2001, chapter 3, p. 81-85): “As time runs on, Ames grows more intense. Democracy cannot last. … When property is snatched from hand to hand … then society submits cravenly to the immorality of rule by the sword. … Of all the terrors of democracy, the worst is its destruction of moral habits. ‘A democratic society will soon find its morals … the surly companion of its licentious joys.’ … Is there no check upon these excesses? …”

Russell Kirk continued: “The press supplies an endless stimulus to popular imagination and passion; the press lives upon heat and coarse drama and incessant restlessness. ‘It has inspired ignorance with presumption.’ … ‘Constitutions,’ says Ames, ‘are but paper; society is the substratum of government.’ … Like Samuel Johnson, (Ames) finds the key to political decency in private morality.”

Aaron McLeod wrote in “Great Conservative Minds: A Condensation of Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind” (October 2005, Alabama Policy Institute, Birmingham, AL, chp. 3, p. 9-10}: “Ames was pessimistic about the American experiment because he doubted there were sufficient numbers of men with the moral courage and charisma to preserve the country from the passions of the multitudes and the demagogues who master them. He was convinced that the people as a body cannot reason and are easily swayed by clever speakers and political agents. In his words, ‘few can reason, all can feel.’ … Democracy could not last, Ames thundered, ‘for despotism lies at the door; when the tyranny of the majority leads to chaos, society will submit to rule by the sword.’”

Aaron McLeod continued: “To Ames, what doomed the American experiment was the democratic destruction of morals. … Ames believed that justice and morality in America would fail, and popular rule cannot support justice, without which moral habits fall away. Neither the free press nor paper constitutions could safe-guard order from these excesses, for the first is merely a stimulus to popular passion and imagination, while the other is a thin bulwark against corruption. When old prescription and tradition are dismissed, only naked force matters.”

Fisher Ames’ views were similar to President George Washington, who stated in his farewell address, Sept. 19, 1796: “With slight shades of difference, you have the same Religion. … Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness. … The mere Politician … ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. …”

Washington continued: “Let us with caution indulge the supposition, that morality can be maintained without religion. Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. … Virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. … Who that is a sincere friend to it, can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

George Washington died Dec. 14, 1799. Fisher Ames delivered a eulogy “An Oration on the Sublime Virtues of General George Washington,” Feb. 8, 1800, at Boston’s Old South Meeting-House, before the Lieutenant Governor, the Council, and both branches of the Massachusetts Legislature (Boston: Young & Minns, 1800, p. 23): “Our liberty depends on our education, our laws, and habits. … It is founded on morals and religion, whose authority reigns in the heart, and on the influence all these produce on public opinion before that opinion governs rulers.”

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

Should Healthcare Be Paid For By Corporations or Government?

 

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

The debate goes on, should the government be responsible for providing our health care?

There are many arguments for and against national healthcare. 

At one time, everyone was responsible for their own health, there was no insurance. In that day and age, medical care was a lot less expensive than it is today, even taking into account the rate of inflation over the years.

The rise in cost has in part is because of all the new technology available today, but to a large degree, the rising cost is due to increased demand. 

Because of the change in our national mentality, in a large part due to negotiated union contracts, everyone thinks their health care is free. Most have come to believe it is a right, a right no one pays for. 

I’m a firm believer that affordable healthcare should be available to everyone. 

However, because of the present system, very few people realize the cost of health care, and because it is presumably free to them, they go to the doctor for every little sniffle they get. Many visits are unnecessary and costly. People go to the emergency room for a skinned knee, or a splinter in their hand, these emergencies could be taken care of at home. 

It has become “fashionable” to go to the emergency room. 

Health insurance should be paid for by the individual. If each individual was responsible for their healthcare, they would become more knowledgeable on what “works” and what doesn’t. 

Most companies that provide health insurance allocate a certain amount of wages for the payment of benefits including health insurance, whether they tell the employee or not.

The individual employee should be made aware of this, that money should be allocated to the individual so they can purchase their health care on an individual basis.

Thereby eliminating any corporate influence the company could exert on the insurance company, and it would open the insurance industry to more competition, that is always a good thing.

That would enable the individual to have more control over his health and ensure his right to have or not have insurance.

In some cases, when both spouses work and are covered by their individual company insurance,  both companies are providing and paying for health insurance and only one health plan is needed.

Therefore, money is wasted by the couple because they don’t use the insurance provided by one company. If the money was allocated to the employee, he or she could decide how to best use the money in a way that would benefit the couple instead of the money being flushed down the drain.

It would make the individual more responsible for his own health and welfare, and it would be his choice to have or not have health insurance.

If he chooses not to have health insurance, then he would be responsible for any charges incurred, and pay the consequences for not having insurance.

By cutting down on the demand by eliminating people going to a doctor or emergency room unless necessary, then the cost would naturally come down, and people would find the alternative, less expensive, better forms of treatment. 

Of course, there will always be an element of society who are unable to care for themselves and they should be provided for, but there are far too many people abusing the system.  

The only way to prevent that is for people to be in charge of their own health.  Regardless of what you believe, no one, including the government will look after you like you will.

This is America, our country was founded on the idea of the individual being able to make his or her own choices concerning how to run their lives, it’s time we returned to those ideals and get government out of life management.

photo of Vietnam war memorial

The Vietnam War Memorial with the Washington Monument in the background

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Growing Up In Indiana: Entertainment on a Saturday Night

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Times were simple, it was an uncomplicated life back then.

Growing up in the 50s, we were the fortunate ones. Little did we know what lie ahead of those innocent times.Life was hard but good. Money wasn’t an issue, nobody had any.

Our entertainment was simple, we either went to see friends and ate popcorn, or we went shopping in a grocery store with two aisles and stopped at grandmas on the way home. Or we stayed home.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

We Have Created Our Reality

 

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Many dispute the fact that we humans create the reality we live in, most just shrug their shoulders and attribute everything that they experience as fate and search no further for answers.

Look around you, look at the current condition of the world, all the violence, the corruption, warfare, discontent, where did that come from? Did it just happen?

The world has always been a pretty cruel place, but it is an awfully beautiful planet as well. There have always been negative events in the world, but in this day and age, things are different. 

People condone bad behavior, it is accepted and no one judges or has an opinion.  This has lead to a general downfall of morals and values, and we have abandoned God.

What have we, as a country been thinking the last sixty years?

We wonder where God is, and how could he let these things happen to a righteous people?

Many look to an outside force for the cure to our ills, but the simple fact is, as a nation, we have become unrighteous., we no longer believe or try to uphold the values that this country was founded on and made us great.

Many discount any reference to people being able to create their reality, they believe it is all up to God.

Things go wrong and they ask,”Where is God?”

God was taken from the equation.

What has our thinking been the last several decades, where have our thoughts been?

Most have forgotten about what is important in life, worrying more about if they can afford the latest smartphone than they are about doing the right thing, or raising their kids in a good environment, teaching them good values and trying to lead them down the correct path in life.

As a nation, our values and ethics have gone down the toilet. If you casually mention how people thought or believed sixty years ago, you are looked at and scorned as if you came from a different planet.

A football player is ridiculed for praying on the field of battle while others are praised for disrespecting the American flag.

The democratic party booed God at their national convention in 2012, and we have kicked him out of the public arena.

Mass shootings are common in this era, all sorts of unnatural behavior is condoned and encouraged, and we wonder what happened.

We created our own reality.

A man reaps what he sows.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Our Second Amendment Rights


People often ask, especially people from other countries, why are Americans so obsessed with guns, why are we so insistent on preserving our right to protect ourselves and encourage everyone to have a gun in spite of all the gun violence in the world today?

What they fail to realize is that gun rights have played a part in our nation since the very beginning.

The first shots fired at Bunker Hill, which began our American Revolution was a direct result of the British attempt to seize the guns of the American colonists.

After the revolt over unfair taxation, the first step of the Crown in an attempt to take control over the colonies was an attempt to capture an arsenal and seize our guns, thus eliminating our ability to defend ourselves.

This act implanted in our minds the need to have the ability to defend ourselves from the aggressive acts of government by maintaining a right to bear arms. This measure not only defends Americans from an oppressive government, but it also protects people around the world from oppressive governments as well.

If we didn’t have our second amendment rights, sooner or later we would fall to a different form of government and we would lose our ability to help other countries in need.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Aboriginal Culture: Raising the Young

 

In the past only healthy babies were kept, they were suckled for seven years and if the mother couldn’t keep up with work and the child, the baby was killed. Most tribes contained 20- 30 people, with 4-5 in each family. Some lived to be 100 years old and some had more than one wife. If a husband passed away, many times the wife and family would be supported by another male.

It took about six acres of land to support one person, they survived by eating whatever was available, including termites, ants, and grub worms.

We even had the chance to eat a grub worm, it was prepared in the usual fashion, roasted in an open pit fire, it wasn’t too bad, tasted like chicken.

If the tribe became too large and there wasn’t enough food, the weaker ones were either killed or left to die.

In the dry years, women would not ovulate. They would have zero population growth. Sometimes the droughts would last 10 years, and there would be no children born during that time. The lack of food and environmental stress ruined the sex drive.

When a woman first felt the kick of her child, the first animal they saw was believed to be its totem or spirit animal, that is the closest source of energy. It could be a snake, kangaroo or anything.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome