It Pays to Not Be Bored

 

Written by: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book, “Those Were The Days.”

I soon learned that if I hung around the house, mom would find something for me to do, and it was normally something I didn’t want to do, so it was best to stay outside and play. I liked to aggravate her, but I soon found out that telling her I was bored wasn’t in my best interests.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Feeding The Chickens At Grandpas

Written By: Gary Wonning

My cousin  Bob and I would sit in the corn crib and make rows in the corn cobs by shelling the corn off the cob and letting it fall to the ground.

Grandpa Huneke was always pretty thrifty and never wasted anything, so I wondered why he would let us shell the corn like this. The corn would only fall through the floor of the crib to the ground below. It seemed like a total waste to me until I looked down one day and saw all his chickens eating the corn. We were having fun and feeding his chickens at the same time.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Ayres Rock, or Uluru, in the Northern Territory of Australia

Written By: Gary Wonning

Uluru (Ayres Rock) is one of Australia’s most recognizable natural icons. The world-renowned sandstone formation stands 1,142 feet high,2,831 ft above sea level, with most of its bulk below the ground, and measures almost 6 miles in circumference. Both Uluru and Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) have great cultural significance for the Traditional landowners, who lead walking tours to inform visitors about the local flora and fauna, bush foods and the dream time stories of the area.

As the bus rumbled to a stop at the base of the giant monolith, my intuition was telling me to leave my camera gear in the bus. I had come all this way, I wasn’t going up that rock without my camera, I wanted some photos. My guides did everything possible to keep me from taking my gear, but I took it anyway.

Although the local Aborigines discourage climbing “The Rock”, many still do. For those that do, the view at the top is well worth the long climb. For those that climb, the only assistance available is a waist high chain to grab on to as one makes his way up the sometimes almost vertical path.

It was an extremely difficult climb, my right shoulder wasn’t entirely healed from the motorcycle accident, I had little strength in my right arm, as a result I needed to stop and rest every few feet.

Climbing to the top, the view is spectacular. Making one’s way across the rim, the view is breathtaking, not only in the distance but also on the rock itself.

At the top of this giant monolith, can be seen several pits and circles that were carved from the rock itself that must have been used for some ancient ceremony.

I found the pit, Hilda, my psychic had told me about the previous autumn. I lay down in it and tried to meditate, but there was too much activity surrounding me to continue. However, knowing how the universe works, I probably accomplished what I needed to. Sometimes we just need to touch base with the past.

I did take several photos while there, however, when I returned home and developed the slides, every one of them was completely black. Should have listened to my gut.

One of Uluru’s most unique features is that it appears to change color as the different light strikes it at different times of the day and year, sunset is a particularly remarkable sight when it briefly glows red. Although rainfall is uncommon in this semi-arid area, during wet periods the rock acquires a silvery-gray color, with streaks of black algae forming on the areas that serve as channels for water flow.

Special viewing areas with road access and parking have been constructed to give tourists the best views of Uluru at dawn and dusk.

As we watched the glow of Ayres Rock fade into the sunset, it was time to find our campground only a short distance away. It was well after dark when we arrived and set up camp for the evening, soon steaks were grilling on the campfire.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Life On The Farm

Written By: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book, Those Were the Days My Friend.

It was a good life, growing up on a farm, I often felt sorry for my cousins who lived in Indianapolis. Financially they were better off than we were, but I had animals to be around, could go fishing anytime I wanted, a creek to play in and mom and dad pretty much let me roam anywhere I wanted on the farm.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Aborigines Have Lost Their way

Written by: Gary Wonning

Alcoholism and drug abuse is a major problem among the Aborigines because they have lost their purpose in life. They have lived in the outback for thousands of years and know of no other way of life.

Their way of life is becoming not only unpopular but impossible as well. Regardless of how much the government helps them, for the most part, they are unable to adapt.

To the aborigine, life was all about survival, we are taught a work ethic in order to improve our lot and to make a better life. The aborigine knew no such thing, because of their extreme environment, their only focus was survival, they don’t understand and laugh at us for working so hard.

People say to them that it must be great to live off the land, their reply is “If you think it is so great, try it!”

In the extreme environment, only the healthy babies were kept, they were suckled for seven years and if the mother couldn’t keep up with work and the child, the baby was killed.

It was a matter of survival.

Most tribes contained twenty to thirty people, with four or five in each family, some lived to be 100 and some had more than one wife, many times if the husband died, another man would take his wife so he could support her.

If the tribe became too large and there wasn’t enough food, the weaker ones were either killed or left to die.

They would rub animal fat on their bodies to shut down sweating in order to conserve water. They still don’t wear many clothes because of the heat, clothes create body odor.

In the dry years, women would not ovulate, they had zero population growth, sometimes the droughts would last ten years, so there would be no children born in that time. The lack of food and environmental stress ruined the sex drive.

When a woman first felt the kick of a child, the first animal they saw was believed to be it’s totem or spirit animal because that is the closest source of energy. It could be a snake, kangaroo or anything.

Same totems can’t marry, they know inbreds become stupid.

Because of the lack of rainfall, it took about six acres of land to support one person, they survived by eating whatever was available, including termites, ants and grub worms.

One of the highlights was meeting Ted Mitchell, one of the last Trackers, someone who could find an individual regardless of the environment. The story was told that a young child had gotten lost in the bush, after searching with helicopters, dogs and search teams, Ted was called in to help, within a half an hour he came back with the child in his arms.

The aborigines believe that when we visit a place, we leave an image, and a person trained to see that image can follow someone regardless of the terrain or how long they have been gone.

Their teachings show many examples of such happenings, as well as casting spells on someone thousands of miles away, the victim being affected by it even though he has no knowledge of the spell being cast.

The aborigine who has been taught the Dream time is very intuitive and extremely aware of his surroundings, Crocodile Dundee was all Hollywood, but not very far off on this perspective.

The songfest came to an end, our time to leave had arrived, we packed up our swag, our personal belongings and made our journey back to Cairns and civilization.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Logic to Right the World

Written By: Gary Wonning

Logic teaches us to guide our reasoning discretionary in the general knowledge of things, and directs our inquiries after truth.  a regular train of argument whence we infer, deduce, and conclude according to certain premises laid down and we are given the facilities to conceive and reason where we are able to move from one graduation to another until the point in question is finally known or determined.

Sometimes life unknowingly follows logic and we often wind up somewhere and learn something other than what our original intentions may have been.

Such was the case several years ago when I had the opportunity to spend some time in the outback of Australia. Originally, the purpose of the expedition was to photograph various areas of the country with the goal to publish a photo book on the life of the Australian people, including the aborigines.

This particular morning, we were on our way to Ayres Rock, or Uluru as the aborigines call it. A giant monolith in the middle of Australia, the largest sacred site in the world.

The bus picked us up at about 6 AM and as it made the final stop at another hotel to pick up the last two people, a cute young lady and her brother boarded the bus.

By the time the young lady boarded the bus the only remaining seat was next to me, being quite shy, she reluctantly sat next to me.

More interested in getting some sleep than starting up a conversation, it was nap time.

A few hours later I woke from my nap and discovered the young girl had fallen asleep on my shoulder.

Being the perfect gentleman that I am, and quietly deciding what my next  move would be , I never moved so as to not disturb her.

Here I am, on a bus , 10,000 miles from  home,in the middle of nowhere, with a bunch of people I’m never going to see again, and I have a cute young girl sleeping on my shoulder, I’m just going to savor this for a while.thank you God.

Soon she woke up, and realizing where she was , she was quite embarrassed.

Wanting to strike up a conversation, I asked where she was From. “Switzerland”  was the reply. She said she was traveling around the world with her brother and her final stop would be in the United States to visit her fiance who was a cadet at the Air Force Academy in Colorado.

So much for my well thought out plans.

She then asked about me and I informed her I was from the United States.

She then asked rather rudely, I thought,”What are you doing over here in Australia?”

Searching for an answer, I replied that I was with a group of 150 photographers that were photographing various parts of the continent and were planning on publishing a book upon returning to the states.

I asked her why she asked why I was in Australia.

Her reply,”If I lived in the United States I would never go anywhere else, you have everything there anyone could ever want or need.”

“WOW” I had never thought that before.

A 19-year-old kid from Switzerland just told me something I had never really totally realized before. I never forgot that.

A couple of weeks later, nearing the end of our journey, we entered the tiny town of Daly Waters in the Northern Territory a couple of hundred miles south of Darwin.

After spending nearly a month in the outback removed from the rest of the world, most of us had forgotten what day it was, it really didn’t matter as long as the driver got us where we needed to be when we needed to be there. By that time most of us didn’t want the adventure to end and remembering the day just made the time seem shorter.

As we entered the tiny village of a population of seventeen, I noticed an old C-47 with U.S. markings sitting on an abandoned runway. At the time I never thought much of it.

We entered the pub, looking for something to quench our thirst.

To our surprise, the pub was nearly full, this was unusual, even by Aussie standards. It was the middle of the afternoon in the middle of the week.

I wasn’t sure what day it was, but I knew it wasn’t the weekend, we were scheduled to be in Darwin on Saturday, this wasn’t Darwin, so it had to be the middle of the week.

Getting a drink, someone asked an older gentleman what they were celebrating.

  He replied they were celebrating the fourth of July.

We were startled, why would they be celebrating this America holiday?

His answer was that Australia was really appreciative about how the Yanks had bailed the Aussies out during WW2 when the Japanese attacked them during the war.

Totally unprepared, Australia would have fallen had it not been for help from the United States.

It was gratifying to see people appreciate what America had done in the past.

It was sure a far cry from the rhetoric from the media and the left.

I could go on and on, there have been numerous times the same theme has been conveyed to myself, and I’m sure to others as well.

Most people, even today realize, in spite of our faults, what a force for good the United States has been in world affairs.

Our local Shriner’s center has a weekly luncheon for the nobles who are able to attend.

A few years ago, a visiting noble from Massachusetts introduced himself and related how he was ninety-three years old, a world war two and Korean war veteran and how he was concerned about the direction the country was headed.

As he walked back to his seat, he stopped, put his hand on my shoulder and with a tear in his eye, said,”I just don’t want to leave this world in the shape it’s in.”

Here is a retired veteran, who has already given more to his country than most of us would even think about doing, wanting to do more.

That’s something you can hang your hat on.

In this country, We don’t fight for a president, a congress or a government, we fight for an idea, an idea born several thousand years ago carried down through the ages by men seeking light. An idea that finally reached fruition by a group of about two hundred men a couple hundred years ago in a hot humid room in Philadelphia.

The idea of freedom and liberty, the idea that men and women should be able to choose how to live and run their lives with the least amount of government interference possible.

That is what our men and women in the military and law enforcement fight for every day of their lives.

We Americans sometimes forget how lucky we are to live in the country we do, and enjoy the freedoms most others in the world can only dream about.

The same can be said for masonry, and its appendant bodies, masonry or a version of it has been around since the dawn of time. The secrets of masons in masonry will tell you everything you need to know, to not only lead a good life, but improve the lives of others and our country.

We don’t have to do anything new, the mysteries of masons in masonry aren’t secrets, they are out in the open for those able to see them.

The planet is rebooting we did in the 60s, some things are disappearing and many others are appearing.

Many of the old ways, thankfully, are falling by the wayside, making way for a new and better version.

All we need to do is to not throw the baby out with the bathwater, discard what doesn’t work and keep what works.

How do we know what to keep?

Remember what made this country great and all the good we as Americans have done in the world.

As I try to explain in my book, “The Wisdom of Our Ancestors,” by the way, it’s available on Amazon along with the six other books I have written, I list 39 different principles we were taught growing up that are no longer taught to many of our young people,

All we need to do is get back to the basics and apply the time-worn principles of masonry.

In this country, We don’t fight for a president, a congress or a government, we fight for an idea, an idea born several thousand years ago and carried down through the ages by men seeking light. An idea that finally reached fruition by a group of about two hundred men a couple hundred years ago in a hot humid room in Philadelphia.

The idea of freedom and liberty, the idea that men and women should be able to choose how to live and run their lives with the least amount of government interference possible.

Those are the principles we stand for.

How do we, as masons, return our country to its rightful standing in the world and before God?

We just use logic, Logic teaches us to guide our reasoning discretionary in the general knowledge of things, and directs our inquiries after truth.A regular train of argument whence we infer, deduce, and conclude according to certain premises laid down and we are given the facilities to conceive and reason where we are able to move from one graduation to another until the point in question is finally known or determined.

We don’t have all the answers, we just take one step forward, and follow our guide, the answers will be given to us at the proper time.

We walk by faith, not by sight.

Retiring in 1994 from United Parcel Service where he became a member of the distinguished UPS Circle of Honor, whose nine thousand plus members have all attained over twenty-five years of safe accident-free driving

Gary has done everything but retire.   After moving from his native state of Indiana to Sedona Arizona, he continued to not only drive but study native cultures and the changes in our own American culture.

The author of seven books, all published on Amazon.

www.journeysthrulife.com

He has seen the decline of a once great nation, to one that has become lost and struggling for a new identity.

Just like some of the great cultures of the past, America has become a victim of it’s own success, achieving much in the field of science and technology, but losing the spiritual foundation that once made it great.

We also run the risk of losing our culture and our way of life if we don’t once again return to the doctrines that made this great nation great.

  

The Divine Marriage 

 

The definition of marriage is changing daily.

At one time, marriage was between one man and one woman, in today’s world, it can be between a man and a woman, two men, or two women.

Soon it will change and anything will be legal, threesomes, foursomes, group marriage or marriage to animals. Once the definition was changed, anything is permissible, it’s just a matter of time.

Although I agree with the concept that everyone has a right to run their life, and or screw it up however they choose, and two people can love each other, regardless of sex,  in my own opinion, there are limits.

Although marriage may be acceptable in many different forms, and we all need to experience various lifestyles as our soul evolves through many lifetimes, and gay marriage would certainly be a part of that overall experience, the final analysis is that a divine marriage would be between one man and one woman.

It all boils down to the twin flame concept, the duality of life which is evident in all phases of creation.

Everything on this planet has its polar opposite.

Male/female, black/white, positive/negative, light/dark, etc.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome