The Future Is Now

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

I remember standing out in my front yard as a child one evening, I was probably about five or six years old.

At the time I lived in southern Indiana and looking towards the east, I saw Washington D.C. going up in flames. I hardly knew what Washington D.C. was, I had heard it was our nation’s capital, but being as young as I was I didn’t realize what the city stood for.

I just knew our government was in trouble and it seemed as if it was a few years after the turn of the 21st century. It seemed to be really troubling times.

This was about 1950, so it seemed really far off, and I pretty much forgot about it.

Several years later, in the late 80s, I had an opportunity to speak with a very knowledgeable and intuitive lady. Someone who should have been famous, but wasn’t.

She gave me the same information about the coming turmoil, repeating what I had heard in my youth.

I listened to what she had said, but it never really registered how bad it could get, we had just survived the protests of the sixties, how much worse could it be?

She said there would be much rioting and discontent, but it would be confined to the major cities and if we stayed out of them we would be fine.

She said the problems would come from the way the majority of our children had been raised after the sixties, the permissiveness and lack of control many parents had over their kids, and the way American society had forgotten what had made us great.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Soon after that, I went to a motivational seminar, where Zig Ziglar was speaking, he said the same things, I still didn’t heed the warnings.

Most of us were raised in a different world, we were busier than a one-armed monkey at a flea festival. We raised our kids in that world, but somehow things changed and people forgot or didn’t think it was important to remember any more.

This is how most cultures decline and finally disappear, being taken over by a more barbaric society, until they no longer exist.

I took it with a grain of salt and went about my way as many others had done who had heard the same warnings, after all, our parents and grandparents had been saying the same thing for years, the world was going to hell in a handbasket.

Soon it was the turn of the century, and suddenly, the things I had seen and was told about began coming true.

It seemed chaos was everywhere, no self-control or discipline, no respect for the law, or others, profanity, everything that was right was wrong, and everything that was wrong was right.

Bad behavior became condoned and accepted, anyone who disagreed and remembered the values taught them at a younger age, were condemned and ridiculed.

Suddenly changing things back seemed about as difficult as scratching your ear with your elbow.

The world had been turned upside down, and all the problems of the world somehow seemed to be the fault of the United States.

You hear constantly on the media and from some politicians how horrible a place the United States is, how cruel we are to minorities, the disabled, etc.

I found during my travels, this is not the way the average person across the globe feels, that is only media and political rhetoric, designed to sell ads and garner votes by pandering to humanity’s basic trait, fear.

While in the outback of Australia, I got into a conversation with a nineteen-year-old girl from Switzerland, she couldn’t understand why I would travel somewhere besides America, she made the statement that if she lived in America, she would never leave, in her words,”America has everything a person could ever want or need.”

A few days later, we entered the tiny town of Daly Waters in the Northern Territory. They were celebrating the 4th of July, being appreciative of how the yanks saved them from the Japanese during WW2.

I’ve been on an Italian cruise ship with about 4000 passengers and only about 20% Americans, they sang our national anthem and everyone stood up placed their hands over their heart and sang, giving us a two-minute standing ovation when the song was completed.

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Most thinking people appreciate and respect what America has done over the last 200 hundred plus years.

America has endured a lot, and I believe it has a manifest destiny. We would have never become a nation or survived without what George Washington would call, Divine Providence and Divine Intervention.

Fighting against impossible odds, he often gave credit to Divine Intervention for his successes.

Adhering to the basic tenets of our country, the Constitution, Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence and the Ten Commandments we have weathered the many storms that have befallen us.

Now we face a new challenge, maybe the most critical challenge in our history.

Before, the threat to our country has come from without, now it comes from within.

Many have forgotten what made us great as a country or no longer seem to think it is important.

They seem to believe they can do and think as they please, without regard to anyone or anything else.

We have lost our way.

As I soon discovered in my travels, everyone worships God in their own way, that is what our founders wanted, we have freedom of religion, not freedom from religion.

We have the God-given right to express our religious beliefs in public or anywhere we chose, not to force them on anyone, but to express them as we see fit, as long as it doesn’t harm someone else, and we respect what others feel, and not infringe on their space.

The Maya, Egyptians, and Aborigines of Australia were more in tune with their creator than we are today.

Many of the aborigines still are, even though some of them have become radicalized and developed an entitlement attitude because of what the Australian government has done to try and help them.

All three cultures have regressed, the Egyptians went from calling their leaders, Gods, To Pharaohs, then kings, and now presidents.

The Maya have all but disappeared as a culture, and the aborigines are slowly dying off and trying to adapt, in the process turning to drugs and alcohol.

I see the same thing in the United States, many here are also turning to drugs and alcohol because they no longer have a spiritual foundation to rely on.

We have a drug epidemic stretching from Times Square to the cornfields of Indiana.

In an area where the Friday night entertainment was a basketball game, now several people wind up in the hospital from a drug overdose. It happens weekly.

It doesn’t even make the news anymore, it’s not uncommon for the emts to run out of narcon.

Earlier this year, the morgue in Dayton Ohio ran out of room, an airline pilot for a major airline overdosed with his wife while their young child watched.

The list goes on and on, there seems to be no end to it.

The bad behavior, lack of respect, a sense of entitlement, profanity, and people sit at home watching mindless TV while ignoring their churches, social, fraternal and civic organizations.

In spite of it all, I still believe there are many good people out there, I think the majority of Americans still have their heads on straight, their voices get silenced and their cause doesn’t get good TV ratings or sell ads in your local paper.

Many are worried, they see what is going on and feel as helpless as a cow in quicksand.

Over the last several years, America has been fundamentally changed, because of negative influences from many politicians and the media, we have forgotten where we came from and what America once stood for.

But we really can’t blame anyone but ourselves, we could not have been fundamentally transformed if we hadn’t let it happen.

We stood by silently as our country was changed from within, no one or not many even said a word, and few noticed.

Some thought it was wonderful, thinking the world has changed and we need to just go along with the flow.

Many no longer adhere to the Wisdom of Our Ancestors, that knowledge that was once passed down from generation to generation, from time immemorial.

The very things we got so tired of hearing and we swore to never repeat to our descendants, we never wanted to sound like our parents, how wrong we were.

This is how great cultures rise and fall, they become great through their deeds and beliefs, they then reach a pinnacle and begin enjoying the fruits of their labor, allowing decadence to overcome their common sense, becoming a victim of and falling to their own success.

They forget about God and become focused on their own self-importance, until they once again fall into subjugation and poverty, completing the cycle, waiting for someone to save them while forgetting no one will save them if they don’t save themselves.

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

They forget the spirit of self-sufficiency and self-reliance that enabled them to become successful.

It came upon us slowly, most never even noticed, the stark reality came back to me just a few days ago when a high school friend I hadn’t seen in years remarked that he had noticed it several years ago.

He joined to Air Force out of high school, after he was discharged military service, when at one time it was an honor to serve in the military, and rightfully so, having military experience opened many employment doors and opportunities, he found it hard to get a job in the post Vietnam era if you had served in the military, and once they found you had been to Vietnam, the door closed permanently.

For many, this was the final straw, after having valiantly served and being spit on when coming home, they could now not find a job, our country did a great disservice.

Having finally found employment in the DC area, he began to notice the same people who had lead all the protests in the 60s were now getting high positions in the federal government.

And so it goes today, where once, a military background provided good training, respect, and many essential job skills, they are now looked upon as a detriment, and those in our nation’s government are the very ones who not only then, but now continue to try and bring down our nation.

Today, many have it all wrong, they continuously work to bring down a great nation who has done so much for so many. They continuously look for the negatives brought on by their own personal bad attitudes and a chip on their shoulders.

Many are so mad they could swallow a horned toad backward, but they have no idea what they are mad about.

If you ask them what they are protesting, they can’t tell you. They are just protesting.

Many are looking for personal gain and wealth, siding with those of like mind with an attitude they will somehow rule the world or change things for the better. Little do they realize, that if they form the world and our nation into what they deem a perfect world, they will be the first ones to be killed, and if they live, the world will not be what they had envisioned.

We all know how to fix this, regardless of what we have been told by the media and the left, this is still the greatest nation to have existed on the planet. Americans are still great caring people. Most of us still have a remembrance of the common sense and core values we grew up with, those values taught to us by our parents and elders.

Those values that are despised by those in the media and extremist groups.

If you have forgotten, all you need to do to remember is to read the Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights and the writings of our founding fathers.

Then look deep inside you, past all the things you have been lead to believe by others, look into your heart and you find your answer as to what you need to do,

All knowledge comes from within.

The future is now, it’s your decision as to how this all turns out.

Remember in 1960, Nikita Khrushchev stood before the UN, took off his shoe and beat it on the podium as he stated, ” your grandchildren will be raised as a communist. “

photo of nikita khrushchev at the United Nations

Nikita Khrushchev at the UN

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

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Is It OK To Hunt and Kill an Animal?

 

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

In today’s world, many people often ask if it is ok to hunt and kill an animal. 

With all the political correctness today, many of the old values are being drawn into question, and there are many who want to throw out all the old values and traditions, just because they are old and time worn. 

While there are many things about our society that does need to be changed, we need to be careful what we discard, just because it is a new thought or idea, doesn’t mean it is a good idea. Many values from the past need to be preserved. 

As I grew older, I too wondered if killing an animal was the proper thing to do, or should we all become vegetarians and avoid meat altogether. 

In my earlier years, I grew up on a farm and lived in a farming community, I began hunting at a very early age, probably around ten, and would often bring rabbits home to eat. 

I never gave it much thought until all the scuttlebutt about eating animals began to circulate through the press. 

I thought about this and wondered but I never discussed it with anyone. 

As I was rediscovering my spirituality, I began to research other beliefs than the Christian religion I had grown up with. 

As I did I became involved in the metaphysical movement and thus was involved in some past live regressions and extraterrestrial encounters. 

One afternoon, while under hypnosis at Boynton Canyon Vortex in Sedona, one of my spirit guides gave me the following message,”It’s OK to hunt and kill an animal if you use it for food and clothing. That is part of their life mission, they are here to serve us. but if you kill them for sport and leave the meat to spoil and waste away, that is wrong.”

Sounds good to me, that makes sense. 

These spirit guides are as wise as a tree full of owls. 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Passing Thru the Light Into Another World

Written by Gary Wonning

When many think of dying, they get as nervous as a longtailed cat under a rocking chair. 

The thought of the unknown, and of losing their earthly mode of transportation scares the daylights out of them. 

From what we can learn from those who have gone before we find there really is nothing to fear. 

Passing over can be very calming and pleasant, and as Winston Churchill once said, We have nothing to fear, but fear itself.”

When we pass from one dimension to another, what is often referred to by those on the physical plane as death,  we pass through what many who have had a near-death experience as a tunnel leading to a white light.

Many have described passing past the sun and it gets very hot on their way to the afterlife. This may coincide with the ancient Egyptian belief in a sun God. Where they met with Ra upon death.

The heat is just an illusion, as we pass through the light we, as humans envision it as being the sun.

After passing through this light we get to where we need to go. The light reflects into the darkness and radiates unique and fascinating colors, very beautiful to our soul.

It is a beautiful nothingness, after passing this we enter the afterlife, and observe the radiant tree of life, the river of life and the waterfall.

It is here we meet our fellow souls, the ones with whom we have traveled countless lifetimes with and with whom we will spend countless existences in the future.

It is here we will contemplate our previous earthly existence, what we learned from our trials and tribulations while on the physical plane and how we can best advance our soul growth and what we need to experience in our next adventure on earth, or wherever else we may choose to travel.

After a time, we consult with the council, other souls we have traveled with, various angels and guides who are always ready and able to assist us in our spiritual path.

It is through this council and our own free will and accord that we decide the next best plan for us to pursue and how it can aid us in reaching our ultimate goal, reuniting with our creator.

With Faith and understanding, passing through the light can be as easy as a grasshopper leaping over a caterpillar. 

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

A journey into the unknown. Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

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Life Is All About Seventeen Inches

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

I found this somewhere, it’s a good read.

In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention.While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”

Who the heck is John Scolinos, I wondered. Well, in 1996 Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948.  No matter, I was just happy to be there.

He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate.  Pointed side down.

Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

After speaking for twenty-five minutes, not once mentioning the prop hanging around his neck, Coach Scolinos appeared to notice the snickering among some of the coaches. Even those who knew Coach Scolinos had to wonder exactly where he was going with this, or if he had simply forgotten about home plate since he’d gotten on stage.

Then, finally …

“You’re probably all wondering why I’m wearing home plate around my neck. Or maybe you think I escaped from Camarillo State Hospital,” he said, his voice growing irascible. I laughed along with the others, acknowledging the possibility.

“No,” he continued, “I may be old, but I’m not crazy. The reason I stand before you today is to share with you baseball people what I’ve learned in my life, what I’ve learned about home plate in my 78 years.”

Several hands went up when Scolinos asked how many Little League coaches were in the room. “Do you know how wide home plate is in Little League?” After a pause, someone offered, “Seventeen inches,” more question than answer.

“That’s right,” he said. “How about in Babe Ruth? Any Babe Ruth coaches in the house?”

Another long pause.

“Seventeen inches?”came a guess from another reluctant coach.

“That’s right,” said Scolinos. “Now, how many high school coaches do we have in the room?” Hundreds of hands shot up, as the pattern began to appear. “How wide is home plate in high school baseball?”

“Seventeen inches,” they said, sounding more confident.

“You’re right!” Scolinos barked. “And you college coaches, how wide is home plate in college?”

“Seventeen inches!” we said, in unison.

“Any Minor League coaches here? How wide is home plate in pro ball?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“RIGHT! And in the Major Leagues, how wide home plate is in the Major Leagues?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“SEV-EN-TEEN INCHES!” he confirmed, his voice bellowing off the walls.

“And what do they do with a a Big League pitcher who can’t throw the ball over these seventeen inches?” Pause. “They send him to Pocatello!” he hollered, drawing raucous laughter.

“What they don’t do is this: they don’t say, ‘Ah, that’s okay, Bobby. You can’t hit a seventeen-inch target? We’ll make it eighteen inches, or nineteen inches. We’ll make it twenty inches so you have a better chance of throwing the ball over it.  If you can’t hit that, let us know so we can make it wider still, say twenty-five inches.’”

Pause.

“Coaches …”

Pause.

” … what do we do when our best player shows up late to practice? What do we do if he violates curfew? What if he uses drugs? Do we hold him accountable? Or do we change the rules to fit him? Do we widen home plate?

The chuckles gradually faded as four thousand coaches grew quiet, the fog lifting as the old coach’s message began to unfold.

Then he turned the plate toward himself and, using a Sharpie, began to draw something. When he turned it toward the crowd, point up, a house was revealed, complete with a freshly drawn door and two windows. “This is the problem in our homes today. With our marriages, with the way we parent our kids. With our discipline. We don’t teach accountability to our kids, and there is no consequence for failing to meet standards. We widen the plate!”

Pause. Then, to the point at the top of the house he added a small American flag.

“This is the problem in our schools today. The quality of our education is going downhill fast and teachers have been stripped of the tools they need to be successful….to educate and discipline our young people. We are allowing others to widen home plate! Where is that getting us?”

“And this is the problem in the Church, where powerful people in positions of authority have taken advantage of young children, only to have such an atrocity swept under the rug for years. Our church leaders are widening home plate!”

I was amazed. At a baseball convention where I expected to learn something about curveballs and bunting and how to run better practices, I had learned something far more valuable. From an old man with home plate strung around his neck, I had learned something about life, about myself, about my own weaknesses and about my responsibilities as a leader. I had to hold myself and others accountable to that which I knew to be right, lest our families, our faith, and our society continue down an undesirable path.

“If I am lucky,” Coach Scolinos concluded, “you will remember one thing from this old coach today. It is this: if we fail to hold ourselves to a higher standard, a standard of what we know to be right; if we fail to hold our spouses and our children to the same standards, if we are unwilling or unable to provide a consequence when they do not meet the standard; and if our schools and churches and our government fail to hold themselves accountable to those they serve, there is but one thing to look forward to …”

With that, he held home plate in front of his chest, turned it around, and revealed its dark black backside.

“… dark days ahead.”

Coach Scolinos died in 2009 at the age of 91, but not before touching the lives of hundreds of players and coaches, including mine. Meeting him at my first ABCA convention kept me returning year after year, looking for similar wisdom and inspiration from other coaches. He is the best clinic speaker the ABCA has ever known because he was so much more than a baseball coach.

His message was clear: “Coaches, keep your players — no matter how good they are — your own children, and most of all, keep yourself at seventeen inches.

Photography Prints

Do We Create Our Life?

Written by Gary Wonning

Do we create our life?

That is a question that has been pondered by mystics for centuries. 

We all have free will, it is a fact of nature and is not up for debate.  Free Will isn’t something that can only be applied to certain circumstances and not to others, if we chose the alternative, by choosing that, we would be exercising free will. 

If we are free to choose whether to have a hot fudge sundae or a milk shake,  then we are free to determine all things that come about in our lives.  Free Will is static and unchanging, it isn’t something that is subject to our whims, it is a law of nature, one of the laws of Nature and Nature’s God. 

If we would choose to believe we don’t have free will in all things, we are still practicing free will in order to chose that option. We simply can’t remove ourselves from the reality of free will.

Thoughts create actions and actions create results. If you think back, everything you are experiencing in reality today is the result of actions and thoughts you had sometime in the past. 

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

A journey into the unknown. Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

We like to blame others for our misery, but that is not the case, everything happens for a reason, and those reasons are spawned in our own mind, our own subconscious, our subconscious that is linked to the super conscious, or Christ Consciousness that unites us all.

That consciousness that draws the souls and circumstances to us that results in us being able to accomplish whatever mission we chose to participate in during our time on planet earth. 

Thus we do create our own life with our thoughts and actions, and beliefs. Every experience we have accumulated before entering the physical existence, all those previous lives, enable us to bring new power and strength into our reality: more energy to this life to enable us to make a difference in not only our life, but the lives of all those whom we come into contact with. 

Without us realizing it, our subconscious mind creates the life we are going to experience, well before our physical birth.  It is our super conscious mind that knows our proper course of action, our Christ Consciousness,  this is our connection to the God Force that runs the universe, we all all part of it and through it, our choices and whether we follow the promptings of the soul that determine the direction of our lives and the outcome regardless of the challenges presented us.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

America Doesn’t Have A Mental Health Problem

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Written by Gary Wonning

In light of the recent school shootings and the continuous effort by the hard left to abolish our right to defend ourselves, the new mantra is that America has a Mental health problem and that issue is at the heart of our country’s ills. 

I won’t disagree with that statement, there are many individuals who do have mental health issues brought on by a variety of reasons. and there needs to be facilities and professional care available to help these individuals. 

But there is a larger problem. Mamy of our young have not been taught to cope with the problems that inadvertently come into our lives. Life is what life is, and into every life some rain must fall. We cannot avoid this, regardless of how we prepare. 

In many cases society, and parents no longer provide the needed training for our young. Kids are often sheltered from these adversities by well meaning adults and never given the opportunity to grow from those experiences. 

At the  first sign of  rowdy behavior, or a young child showing a lack of focus, they are given a drug to calm them down. They are just young children, that is what young children do, they don’t focus, let them be a kid, there is nothing wrong with them. 

To be successful in life, and deal with the hardships that come our way, kids need to be taught how to lose, that art has been taken away, these days everyone gets a participation trophy, making everyone a winner. 

There are no participation trophies in real life. How can kids learn to lose if they are taught to be winners regardless of how they perform? How are they ever gong to learn to improve themselves, if they don’t ever have to? 

Political correctness has destroyed what was once the core of our American value system. Self reliance, hard work, personal responsibility, and teaching our children how to deal with adversity have disappeared from the play book of child raising. 

Some parents and families still teach their children the age worn values that made our country great, but they are becoming few and far between.

Because of this,  America now has a moral health problem, our values, as a country have sunk so far below what they were when our great country was founded, its not even the same country anymore. 

Many of the reasons for our kids inabilities to cope are created by the societal changes in our culture and have nothing to do with the individual. Children are no longer raised with the same values instilled in the kids of an earlier era. Many of the values of a time gone by are forgotten and are deemed no longer applicable in today’s modern world. 

Only when our moral health issue is resolved, only then will our mental health issues disappear, and many of the multitude of issues facing us as a country will also fade away and become insignificant once again. 

Only when we once again return to the teachings of our ancestors will our country return to greatness.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Dad is Disabled For a Year: Growing up in Indiana in the 50s

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Written by Gary Wonning

One day, while carrying the milk cans, dad slipped on some mud. As a result, he injured his back and he became bedfast for a year.

Suddenly the task of doing all the farming fell on my shoulders. This included putting out the crops, cultivating, putting up the hay, harvesting them and milking thirty head of cattle morning and night, as well as getting feed for them from the feed mill.

There wasn’t much choice but to jump in and do it. I didn’t mind too much, my parents needed help and I considered it a challenge to see if I could do it. All things considered, everything went as well as could be expected. I somehow managed to get the work done, have a social life, and lead the life a normal sixteen year old would and should have.

At times it was a struggle making it all work, but all in all I learned a lot and enjoyed the challenge. Actually we had too many cattle for the acreage we had. With over thirty head of cattle on sixty-five acres of farmland, it was hard to raise enough food for them, as time went on, we found ourselves buying more and more feed for them. This cut into the profits more and more, every day and we struggled to make ends meet.

The rest of the story!

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome