Devil’s Marbles, Sacred Aboriginal Site

Written by: Gary Wonning

In the creation story of the Dreaming, the Rainbow Serpent fashioned the earth and then returned to a spot east of the Kimberley’s at a place where the rainbow meets the earth. The Rainbow Serpent’s eggs fossilized and became what non-Aborigines now call the Devils Marbles. The Aborigines know them as Karlu Karlu.

Because of this, the Devils Marbles Conservation Reserve is a spiritually significant and sacred site to the Aborigines.

photo of devil's marbles

Devil’s Marbles, Northern Territory, Australia

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Ayres Rock, or Uluru, in the Northern Territory of Australia

Written By: Gary Wonning

Uluru (Ayres Rock) is one of Australia’s most recognizable natural icons. The world-renowned sandstone formation stands 1,142 feet high,2,831 ft above sea level, with most of its bulk below the ground, and measures almost 6 miles in circumference. Both Uluru and Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) have great cultural significance for the Traditional landowners, who lead walking tours to inform visitors about the local flora and fauna, bush foods and the dream time stories of the area.

As the bus rumbled to a stop at the base of the giant monolith, my intuition was telling me to leave my camera gear in the bus. I had come all this way, I wasn’t going up that rock without my camera, I wanted some photos. My guides did everything possible to keep me from taking my gear, but I took it anyway.

Although the local Aborigines discourage climbing “The Rock”, many still do. For those that do, the view at the top is well worth the long climb. For those that climb, the only assistance available is a waist high chain to grab on to as one makes his way up the sometimes almost vertical path.

It was an extremely difficult climb, my right shoulder wasn’t entirely healed from the motorcycle accident, I had little strength in my right arm, as a result I needed to stop and rest every few feet.

Climbing to the top, the view is spectacular. Making one’s way across the rim, the view is breathtaking, not only in the distance but also on the rock itself.

At the top of this giant monolith, can be seen several pits and circles that were carved from the rock itself that must have been used for some ancient ceremony.

I found the pit, Hilda, my psychic had told me about the previous autumn. I lay down in it and tried to meditate, but there was too much activity surrounding me to continue. However, knowing how the universe works, I probably accomplished what I needed to. Sometimes we just need to touch base with the past.

I did take several photos while there, however, when I returned home and developed the slides, every one of them was completely black. Should have listened to my gut.

One of Uluru’s most unique features is that it appears to change color as the different light strikes it at different times of the day and year, sunset is a particularly remarkable sight when it briefly glows red. Although rainfall is uncommon in this semi-arid area, during wet periods the rock acquires a silvery-gray color, with streaks of black algae forming on the areas that serve as channels for water flow.

Special viewing areas with road access and parking have been constructed to give tourists the best views of Uluru at dawn and dusk.

As we watched the glow of Ayres Rock fade into the sunset, it was time to find our campground only a short distance away. It was well after dark when we arrived and set up camp for the evening, soon steaks were grilling on the campfire.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Aborigines Have Lost Their way

Written by: Gary Wonning

Alcoholism and drug abuse is a major problem among the Aborigines because they have lost their purpose in life. They have lived in the outback for thousands of years and know of no other way of life.

Their way of life is becoming not only unpopular but impossible as well. Regardless of how much the government helps them, for the most part, they are unable to adapt.

To the aborigine, life was all about survival, we are taught a work ethic in order to improve our lot and to make a better life. The aborigine knew no such thing, because of their extreme environment, their only focus was survival, they don’t understand and laugh at us for working so hard.

People say to them that it must be great to live off the land, their reply is “If you think it is so great, try it!”

In the extreme environment, only the healthy babies were kept, they were suckled for seven years and if the mother couldn’t keep up with work and the child, the baby was killed.

It was a matter of survival.

Most tribes contained twenty to thirty people, with four or five in each family, some lived to be 100 and some had more than one wife, many times if the husband died, another man would take his wife so he could support her.

If the tribe became too large and there wasn’t enough food, the weaker ones were either killed or left to die.

They would rub animal fat on their bodies to shut down sweating in order to conserve water. They still don’t wear many clothes because of the heat, clothes create body odor.

In the dry years, women would not ovulate, they had zero population growth, sometimes the droughts would last ten years, so there would be no children born in that time. The lack of food and environmental stress ruined the sex drive.

When a woman first felt the kick of a child, the first animal they saw was believed to be it’s totem or spirit animal because that is the closest source of energy. It could be a snake, kangaroo or anything.

Same totems can’t marry, they know inbreds become stupid.

Because of the lack of rainfall, it took about six acres of land to support one person, they survived by eating whatever was available, including termites, ants and grub worms.

One of the highlights was meeting Ted Mitchell, one of the last Trackers, someone who could find an individual regardless of the environment. The story was told that a young child had gotten lost in the bush, after searching with helicopters, dogs and search teams, Ted was called in to help, within a half an hour he came back with the child in his arms.

The aborigines believe that when we visit a place, we leave an image, and a person trained to see that image can follow someone regardless of the terrain or how long they have been gone.

Their teachings show many examples of such happenings, as well as casting spells on someone thousands of miles away, the victim being affected by it even though he has no knowledge of the spell being cast.

The aborigine who has been taught the Dream time is very intuitive and extremely aware of his surroundings, Crocodile Dundee was all Hollywood, but not very far off on this perspective.

The songfest came to an end, our time to leave had arrived, we packed up our swag, our personal belongings and made our journey back to Cairns and civilization.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pleiadians Way of Life

The Pleiadians were aware of occasional visits to Earth and had contact with extraterrestrial intelligences.

The primary tasks of the Pleiadians, according to their own statements, is to protect Earth evolution from intruders stronger than us until we earthlings can develop our technologies to a level where we can protect ourselves.

They have been here in this capacity for thousands of years.

The Spirituality of the Pleiadian’s consists of seven basic principles:

Oneness

Balance

Eternal  Spirituality

Truth

Self-responsibility

Equality

Love

It would appear that these basic principles are more of a  philosophy or way of life as opposed to a religion as such. In this respect, many of the earth based or pagan beliefs are more in line than our modern day religions.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Pleiadians on Personal Responsibility

According to Pleiadian thought, spiritual growth is the responsibility of the individual.

Accepting this fact is a sign of spiritual growth for we must take responsibility for our lives and the actions and choices that we make.

Yes, there have been messengers who have come teaching us about the truth of why we are alive on planet Earth, but we wind up worshiping the individual and not heeding the message after they die.

The messages and teachings get twisted and distorted as they drift further and further away from the original truth.

Human egos then become more involved, secrets are kept, and the people become “sheeple,” as they are led around like sheep.

The Pleiadians say that one evolves by connecting with Creation and studying the natural world.

When The natural world follows the laws of Creation, harmony, and peace are achieved.

The Pleidians teach that knowledge is the key to a spiritual life because that knowledge applied can be wisdom.

Knowledge in and of itself is nothing. This is the basis for the Pleiadian “religion.” The Pleidians encourage humanity to seek a religion of knowledge so that we can evolve and obey the laws of creation. It is crucial to gain knowledge of life and to develop an understanding of the nature of the universe in which we live. This understanding of how and why reality functions as it is the key to evolution and the connection with Creation.

An excerpt from the excellent book

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Jesus and Jesus Barabbas

Written by: Gary Wonning

Many of the older Christian sects believe that Jesus didn’t die on the cross and that someone else died for him.

Some theorize there were two Jesus’s at the time of the crucifixion. Jesus of Barabbas, Son of God, and Jesus, King of the Jews.

Barabbas, according to the language at the time is not a name, but a title meaning Son of God. To appease the Jews, Barabbas, Son of God was let go and not crucified  .

Consequently, in order to appease the Romans, Jesus, King of the Jews,  was a political rebel and thus was crucified on the cross.

These two represented the two pillars of civilization, the pillar of an earthly king and the pillar of a heavenly king, the two must work hand in hand to form a more perfect union.

As we have seen, the two pillars hold a significant position in the civilization of mankind, signifying several different things in various cultures and religious belief systems, such as good/evil, male/female, night/day, darkness/light, etc.

If there were two men named Jesus, it would validity the duality of life and allude to the two pillars, a belief that has descended through the ages.

There were many claimants of the title messiah at that period in time, and two different sects may have each had their own messiah. The meaning of messiah was defined as someone destined to become king, once you made king status, you were no longer a messiah, you were the king.

Tradition held that there would be two messiahs, to work hand in hand to achieve the final victory of Yahweh and achieve victory for his chosen people. This aligns with the twin flame concept which alludes to the theory that at creation, each soul split into two separate entities, each going its own way, learning and growing on its own in order for the soul to learn separateness from its own self and to learn more quickly than if it was just one entity.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Gift of Change

The Gift of Change an excerpt Marianne Williamson

Posted: 17 Aug 2016 11:48 AM PDT

Life as we knew it is passing away, and something new is emerging to take its place.

All of us are playing a part in a larger transformative process, as each of us is being forced to confront whatever it is we do, or even think, that keeps love at bay. For as we block love’s power to change our own lives, we block its power to change the world.

Humanity is moving forward now, though in some ways we are doing so kicking and screaming. Nature seems to be saying to all of us, “Okay, it’s time. No more playing around. Become the person you were meant to be.”

We would like to, but it’s hard. The problems of the world today seem larger than they have ever been before, making it easy to succumb to cynicism, fear, hopelessness, and despair. Until, that is, we remember who we are.

For who we really are is a power bigger than all our problems, both personal and collective. And when we have remembered who we are, our problems — which are literally nothing other than manifestations of our forgetfulness — will disappear.

Well that would be a miracle, you might say. And that is precisely the point.

This book is about learning who we are, that we might become agents of miraculous change. As we release the fear-based thoughts we’ve been taught to think by a frightened and frightening world, we see God’s truth revealed: that who we are at our core is love itself. And miracles occur naturally as expressions of love.

It is said in Alcoholics Anonymous that every problem comes bearing its own solution. And the gift being borne by our current challenges is the opportunity to make a large leap forward in the actualization of our own potential. The only way the world can make a quantum leap, from conflict and fear to peace and love, is if that same quantum leap occurs within us. Then and only then will we become the men and women capable of solving the problems that plague us. As we leap into the zone of our most authentic selves, we enter a realm of infinite possibility.

Until we enter that zone, we are blocked, for God cannot do for us what He cannot do through us. To say He has the solutions to our problems is to say He has a plan for the changes each of us needs to go through in order to become the people through whom He can bring forth those solutions. The most important factor in determining what will happen in our world is what you decide to let happen within you. Every circumstance — no matter how painful — is a gauntlet thrown down by the universe, challenging us to become who we are capable of being. Our task, for our own sakes and for the sake of the entire world, is to do so.

Yet for us to become who we most deeply want to be, we must look at who we are now — even when what we see doesn’t please us. This moment is driving us to face every issue we’ve ever avoided facing, compelling us to get to some rock-bottom, essential truth about ourselves whether we like what we see there or not.

And until we make that breakthrough in ourselves, there will be no fundamental breakthrough in the world. The world we see reflects the people we’ve become, and if we do not like what we see in the world, we must face what we don’t like within ourselves. Having done so, we will move through our personal darkness to the light that lies beyond. We will embrace the light and extend the light.

And as we change, the world will change with us.

We spend so much time on unimportant things — things with no ultimate meaning — yet for reasons no one seems to fully understand, such nonessentials stand at the center of our worldly existence. They have no connection to our souls whatsoever, yet they have attached themselves to our material functioning. Like spiritual parasites, they eat away our life force and deny us our joy. The only way to rid ourselves of their pernicious effects is to walk away … not from things that need to get done, but from thoughts that need to die.

Crossing the bridge to a better world begins with crossing a bridge inside our minds, from the addictive mental patterns of fear and separation, to enlightened perceptions of unity and love. We’re in the habit of thinking fearfully, and it takes spiritual discipline to turn that around in a world where love is more suspect than fear.

To achieve a miraculous experience of life, we must embrace a more spiritual perspective. Otherwise, we will die one day without ever having known the real joy of living. That joy emerges from the experience of our true being — when we detach from other people’s projections onto us, when we allow ourselves permission to dream our greatest dreams, when we’re willing to forgive ourselves and others, when we’re willing to remember that we were born with one purpose:  to love and be loved.

Anyone who looks at the state of the world today is aware that something radically new is called for — in who we are as a species and in our relationship to each other and our relationship to the earth itself. Yet the psychological fundamentals that hold this dysfunctional world in place are like sacred cows: we are afraid to touch them, for fear something bad will happen to us if we do. In fact, something bad will happen to us if we do not. It is time to change. It is time to do what we know in our hearts we were born to do.

We are here to participate in a glorious subversion of the world’s dominant, fear-based thought forms.

There are only two core emotions:  love and fear.  And love is to fear as light is to darkness: in the presence of one, the other disappears. . . .

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome