Major Wolf and Masonry in the Civil War

 

During the Civil War, Confederate Major Enoch Obid Wolf (1829-1910) served with Ford’s Battalion Arkansas Cavalry, Company C. In 1863 he was captured by the Union forces.

He was taken prisoners and along with six other was to be shot in retaliation for the shooting of a Union officer.

Major Wolf, a Freemason, cut a piece from his cane and fashioned a masonic ring from it.

His masonic brothers went to work with a zeal that is only known to a worthy brother in distress and wired to Washington and as a consequence President Lincoln issued a reprieve that arrived just as the firing squad were loading their weapons.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Advertisements

Masonic Brotherhood in the Civil War

 

A second reason why Masonry held together is that membership in a Masonic Lodge is by choice only. No man has ever been recruited into joining a Lodge. Our rules, in fact, prohibit Masons from actively pursuing someone for initiation. Instead, a man interested in becoming a Mason must, “of his own free will and accord,” actively seek out a member of the Lodge which he wishes to join and ask him for a petition for membership.

The third reason is the structure of the Craft itself. There are a number of internal rules and customs that helped the Lodge as a whole avoid the turbulent politics and divisiveness of the War. This allowed the Lodge to continue to function as a place a man could go when he needed help or a quiet haven from the storms that raged outside the Craft. It was then and continues to be today, a place where true brotherhood exists.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonry During the Civil War

 

 

An excerpt from my new book.

The Civil War was the single most divisive event in our nation’s long history. No other war, political event, or national crisis has ever approached the levels of animosity and hatred that the Civil War caused. Brother fought against brother. Fathers against sons. Families were forever split over the idealism of the War. They were not alone. Major national organizations, notably the Baptist Churches, also broke up over the issues of slavery and States’ Rights. The War seemed to destroy the bonds of any organization it touched.

All the organizations, that is, except one: Freemasonry. While the War raged around them, Freemasons held on to the ties and the idealism that brought them together in the first place. Thousands of Masons fought in the War, and many died. But the tenets of the Craft, those ideals and moral codes that we, as Freemasons, strive to abide by, were able to overcome the hatred and the animosity that the War generated.

There are a number of reasons why this organization, more than any other, was able to survive the tumult that was the Civil War. A major reason is the long and storied history of the Craft. The beliefs and tenets of the Lodge predate not only the Civil War, but the Constitution, the discovery of the New World, and, according to some, even the birth of Christ. When a tradition of that many years exists, it is difficult to ignore.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonic Civil War Stories

 

An excerpt from my latest book:

“My father had been a soldier in the Union Army. . .He was made a Mason in a military Lodge. . .Taken prisoner at Arkansas Post, he was carried up the Mississippi River to Rock Island, Illinois. . .My father became. . . desperately ill, and made himself known as a Mason to an officer of the camp. The officer took him to his own home and nursed him back to life. When the war ended, he loaned Father money to pay his way back to his Texas home, and gave him a pearl-handled pistol to protect himself. . .This experience of my father, when I learned about it, had a very great influence upon my life. . .; the fact that such a fraternity of men could exist, mitigating the harshness of war, and remain unbroken when states and churches were torn in two, became a wonder; and it is not strange that I tried for years to repay my debt to it.”

    — Joseph Fort Newton, D.D. in River of Years

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The George Washington Masonic Memorial

The George Washington Masonic Memorial

Located on Shuter’s Hill in Alexandria Virgina, the memorial can be seen for miles in every direction.

How this all came to be is an interesting story.

Shuter’s Hill, or as it was named during the Civil War, Shooters Hill, because at that time there was a fort on this mound and it’s garrison regularly shot cannon and rifles on a regular basis.

Today, most call it Shuter’s Hill.

In 1669 the hill was the property of Robert Howson who sold it to John Alexander for six thousand pounds of tobacco. Eighty years later his great-grandson sold it to John Mills who built a large house on it.

In 1790, Col. Ludwell Lee,  the son of Richard Henry Lee purchased it.  Richard Henry Lee had served during the American Revolution and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

It then came under the ownership of Benjamin Dulaney a third generation Irish American and friend of George Washington. Dulaney was a member of Alexandria Lodge F&AM, he subsequently was present when the lodge elected Washington an honorary member and at the cornerstone ceremony of the US capitol in 1793.

During the civil war, the military built a series of forts the defend the Federal District and to protect the western front. No shots were ever fired and after Lee’s surrender, the forts were decommissioned.

The land eventually became transferred to the George Washington National Memorial Association, and ground was broken on June 4, 1922, construction began on November 5, 1923, with the laying of the cornerstone.

Today, even after thousands of years, the hill remains and now is dedicated to George Washington and the masonic order that did much to establish the United States as the beacon of light it is today.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Schofield House Madison Indiana

One of the most historic buildings in the state of Indiana is the Schofield
House in Madison , Indiana. This Federal-style building was the first
two-story brick house and also the first tavern in Madison. Built in
1817 it was the home of Alexander and Drusilla Lanier.

 

schofield
The house originally had a bedroom, kitchen and tavern on the first floor and a
sleeping room and meeting room on the second floor. In later years the
first floor bedroom became a parlor and the kitchen became a dining
room.
On January 13th 1818, the Lanier -Schofield House saw the formation of
the Grand Lodge of Indiana as fourteen brethren from throughout Indiana
met in the upstairs meeting room with the expressed purpose of doing so.The constitution of the Grand Lodge of Indiana was approved, and five lodges,(Vincennes #1, Madison #2, Charlestown #3, Lawrenceburg #4 and Corydon #5)
demitted from the Grand Lodge of Kentucky to form the initial lodges of
Indiana and after electing Alexander Buckner as the first Grand Master
of Indiana there is no evidence that the building was ever used again
for Masonic ceremonies for 150 years.

Today, the building is owned by the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of the Valley of Indianapolis.Any lodge in Indiana can perform degree work here, however, due to the size of the room, only Entered apprentice degrees are recommended.Interesting? Follow me on Kindle.

Solomon’s Builders

 

Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website.www.commonsensejourneys.com

Your comments appreciated

Enlightenment

Join the author in a journey of enlightenment. Available in Hard copy and Ebooks.