Profanity

 

Profanity

One of the major issues today is the blatant use of profanity. At one time, people tried not to use profanity in mixed company or in public. If profanity was used at all, so-called milder terms were used and the real offensive language was never used, some of the stuff used today, I never even heard of when I was a kid.

The only exceptions, if there was an extreme danger or fear, people would often lose their cool and utter words not heard in the public forum.

This is something that has gradually gotten worse over the years until today there are no limits on what or when you may hear something offensive.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Gun Control and the Militia

 

An excerpt from my book, “The Wisdom of our Ancestors”

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Gun Control

A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed upon.

Unlike in most other countries, our right to keep and bear arms is guaranteed in our constitution. Regardless of what some might think or say, it is an individual right, not a right given to some state or federal military force.

During the time in which our constitution and other founding documents were written, the militia consisted of citizens, not a government police force.

All physically able men, over the age of twenty-one, were automatically enlisted in the militia, it was a citizen police force whose purpose was to protect the rights and lives of the individual against all and every foe, government or otherwise.

The militia was paramount in deciding the fate of our nation; citizen soldiers from the southern states almost single-handedly defeated Cornwallis and drove him to his defeat at Yorktown.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Basketball: A Religion

An excerpt from my book, Those were the days,, my friend.

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Our other religion was basketball, the citizens of the Hoosier State have always been known for their love of the game, especially at the high school level.

In those days, and even today to some degree, there were a lot of really small schools. Many high schools only had enough boys to support a basketball team. Finding nine or eleven boys for baseball or football was out of the question and financially, the cost of supporting a basketball team was a lot less than one of the other major sports.

The varsity team would occasionally get new uniforms. The old uniforms would filter down to the underclassmen, with the seventh graders wearing uniforms that were probably twenty years old.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Learning Respect For Guns

An excerpt from my book, those were the days, my friend

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

I can’t remember when I didn’t go hunting. At first, I would go with dad or grandpa and didn’t carry a gun. My first gun was a BB gun when I was probably seven or eight. I would take it hunting, but I was harmless to all the rabbits, can’t kill much besides a sparrow with a gun of that caliber.

Next came a .22, and I was allowed to go hunting by myself, which I often did after school during rabbit hunting season. I still couldn’t get many rabbits with a 22. The only way was to find one sitting and get him before he moved.  It worked better with groundhogs and chipmunks.

There was no talk of gun control in those days. It was always assumed everyone had a gun, kind of like a right arm. Our guns were in the kitchen corner and the ammunition was in the kitchen drawer right next to the fireworks.

Our parents and grandparents reminded us at least weekly to stay away from those guns; to touch a gun without permission meant a severe punishment by not only my parents but grandparents as well. In those days we had too much respect for our elders to disobey what they said. For the most part, we obeyed.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

At UPS,Everyone Pulls Their Own Weight

 

An excerpt from my book.

Written By: Gary Wonning

That’s the way it was with new employees, there were no free lunches. We broke the new guys in right, there were no slackers, and everyone at UPS has to earn their keep. In many ways, the drivers were harder on the new employees than management was. If all else failed, we would ostracize them until they fell in line. Once you “Got it”, you were part of the brotherhood.

No slackers were allowed, if the new employee didn’t carry his own weight, the older drivers had to, and we weren’t going to do that. They make the same amount of money as we do; they have to do the same work. Male or female, it didn’t matter, you had to prove yourself.

That’s not to say there wasn’t anyone who would help you, we did, as Dave Koger once said, “Don Stork and Wayne Strimple helped me tremendously until I learned the ropes, if it wasn’t for them, I may not have made it”

Of course, the help always came with good-natured sarcasm and politically incorrect comments, all said within hearing distance of others so everyone could get a good laugh. We all knew the comments would be returned in kind at the proper time. That’s what made us so close and willing to take the so-called harassment. We knew that every morning somebody would say something to fire us up and get us ready for the work day.

God forbid you wear something unusual to work or drive a different kind of car, or heaven forbid a rice burner motorcycle.

I realized at that time, unions only help those that can benefit the cause of the union. I then realized it was every man for himself, never again would I trust the union for anything. The mere fact they were using my dues to donate to political candidates I would never vote for was also a large thorn in my side.

Common Sense for the Modern era.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Noah Had the Right Idea

 

Noah had it right

With all the discord in the world and knowing most people don’t listen and ultimately do their own thing, I have come to the conclusion that Noah had it right all along. 

People weren’t listening to him and they were doing whatever they pleased so Noah saw the handwriting on the wall, he got on a boat and left. 

Not his problem, not his circus. He created his own circus.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Farming In Shifts

 

Written By: Gary Wonning

During the spring planting, if the rains delayed us, we would work in shifts,.

At first, we only had one tractor, so dad would start working the fields at sunup and I would do the milking, then when I was finished, I would bring a five gallon can of gas and take over while he did other chores.

We would take turns eating lunch, each bringing more gas so the tractor would run constantly until after dark, we only stopped to sleep, then do the same thing the next day until the crops were planted.

Soon we added headlights to the tractor so we could see to work after the sun went down.

 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome