What Is There To Do In Indianapolis

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Recently a friend of a friend mentioned that he didn’t enjoy going to Indianapolis because there  wasn’t anything to do. 

It was one of those times when I was at a loss for words. 

Indianapolis is a beautiful city, especially downtown. It has been completely refurbished and there are many fine restaurants, bars, and entertainment in the downtown area is at a premium. 

It is home to the Indianapolis Colts, Pacers, and it is a center for amateur sports, including high school basketball. 

A triple AAA baseball team resides just a few short blocks away, and the world’s greatest spectacle in racing, the Indianapolis 500 is held annually with a museum that is open daily. 

There are many parks and historic sites close by and the best of all, we are all Hoosiers, Hoosier hospitality runs abundant, everyone is a neighbor and friend.

Hoosiers are known for being friendlily to a fault, it is never a problem to engage in conversation with our fellow man , living in a small town, everyone we meet is considered family. 

We don’t need to be entertained, or spend huge sums of money to fill our time. 

I’m not sure what he meant by there not being anything to do in Indianapolis, I guess we just think differently in the Midwest than  those on the east coast. 

Indiana history

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

 

 

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History of Bradenton Florida

photo of Siesta Key beach

A photo story of the sunshine state, Florida

Written and photographed by Gary Wonning

One of the best kept secrets of Bradenton is the memorial park dedicated to Hernando De Soto early explorer to Florida.

Located off Manatee avenue on the northwest corner of Bradenton, the park is a quiet refuge from the rigors of modern day life. 

 

Sunset on Anna Marie Island

Anna Marie Island offers a beautiful sunset and a view of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Sumer Is the Accepted Birthplace of Mankind

 

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

Sumer is the accepted birthplace of civilization, and much of the writing, theology and building techniques in use today had their humble beginnings in that ancient land. Even the farming techniques of today seem to have sprung from that long forgotten time.

They were highly efficient in not only farming and the making of ceramics and textiles, they were also artificers of fine metals and were excellent stone carvers and invented the wheel.

Because of their industrious nature, their booming economy attracted travelers from many distant lands and because of this trade became prosperous for the then known world.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

photo of siesta key

Siesta Key, #1 beach in the United States

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The seperation of church and state

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Barton, David (2015-12-22). The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You’ve Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson

Significantly, the entire history of the separation doctrine centered on preventing the State from taking control of the Church, meddling with or controlling its doctrines, or punishing its religious expressions. Throughout history, it had been the State that had seized and controlled the Church, not the opposite. Furthermore, the separation doctrine had never been used to secularize the public square. As affirmed by early Quaker leader Will Wood, “The separation of Church and State does not mean the exclusion of God, righteousness, morality, from the State.”

Early Methodist bishop Charles Galloway agreed that “the separation of the Church from the State did not mean the severance of the State from God, or of the nation from Christianity.”  The philosophy of keeping the State at arm’s length and limited from either regulating religious practices or punishing religious expressions was planted deeply into American thinking.

Eventually, it was nationally enshrined in the First Amendment, which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the Free Exercise thereof …” The first part of this Amendment is now called the Establishment Clause and the latter part, the Free Exercise Clause. The language of each is clear; and both clauses were pointed solely at the State, not the Church. The Establishment Clause prohibited the State from enforcing ecclesiastical conformity, and the Free Exercise Clause ensured that the State would protect – rather than suppress, as it currently does – citizens’ rights of conscience and religious expression. Both clauses are explicit prohibitions only on the power of Congress (i.e., the government), not on religious individuals or organizations.

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This was the meaning of “separation of church and state” with which Jefferson was intimately familiar; and it was this interpretation, and not the modern perversion of it, that he repeatedly reaffirmed in his own writings and practices. This is especially evident in his famous letter that invoked the separation phrase. Consider the background of that letter and why Jefferson wrote it. When Jefferson, the political head of those originally known as the Anti-Federalists (but subsequently known as Democratic-Republicans, or Republicans), became president in 1801, his election was particularly well received by Baptists. This political disposition was understandable, for across much of American history, the Baptists had frequently found their free exercise of religion restricted under the power of a legal alliance between the government and state-established churches.

Baptist ministers in various regions had often been beaten, imprisoned, fined, or banned by civic authorities who were joined to state-established churches, so it was not surprising that Baptists strongly opposed centralized government power, including at the federal level. For this reason, the predominately Baptist state of Rhode Island refused to send delegates to the Constitutional Convention;  and the Baptists were the only denomination in which a majority of its clergy across the nation voted against the ratification of the Constitution for fear of federally-consolidated powers.

Your kind prayers for the protection and blessing of the common Father and Creator of man, and tender you, for yourselves and your religious association, assurances of my high respect and esteem.”  The Danbury Baptists then expressed their grave concern over governmental laws that protected their free exercise. As they explained: Our sentiments are uniformly on the side of religious liberty – that religion is at all times and places a matter between God and individuals; that no man ought to suffer in name, person, or effects on account of his religious opinions; that the legitimate power of civil government extends no further than to punish the man who works ill to his neighbor.

But sir, our constitution of government is not specific…. Religion is considered as the first object of legislation and therefore what religious privileges we enjoy (as a minor part of the State) we enjoy as favors granted and not as inalienable rights.

This was the meaning of “separation of church and state” with which Jefferson was intimately familiar; and it was this interpretation, and not the modern perversion of it, that he repeatedly reaffirmed in his own writings and practices. This is especially evident in his famous letter that invoked the separation phrase.

These ministers were troubled that their “religious privileges” were being guaranteed by the apparent generosity of government. Many citizens today do not grasp their concern. Why would ministers object to the State guaranteeing their enjoyment of religious privileges? Because to the farsighted Danbury Baptists, the mere presence of governmental language protecting their free exercise of religion suggested that its exercise had become a government-granted right (and thus a right that could be taken away or regulated) rather than a God-given unalienable right (which was to be untouched by government). Fearing that the inclusion of language in governing documents securing their “religious privileges” might someday cause the government wrongly to believe that since it had “granted” the freedom of religious expression it therefore, had the authority to control and restrict.

No power over the freedom of religion … [is] delegated to the United States by the Constitution [the First Amendment].  In matters of religion I have considered that its free exercise is placed by the Constitution independent of the powers of the general [federal] government. O ur excellent Constitution … has not placed our religious rights under the power of any public functionary.  None of these or any other statements by Jefferson contain even the slightest hint that religion should be removed from the public square, or that it should be secularized, but rather only that the government could not limit or regulate it. The possibility that the government might do so is what had troubled the Danbury Baptists. Fully understanding their concerns, Jefferson replied to them on January 1, 1802, assuring them that they had nothing to fear – the government would not meddle with their religious expressions, whether they occurred in private or in public.

The blogger has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of young living oils

Improve your health through essential oils

a lutheran church against a sunny blue sky.

CONGRESS SHALL MAKE NO LAW RESPECTING AN ESTABLISHMENT OF RELIGION, NOR PROHIBITING THE FREE EXERCISE THEREOF.

The very men who gave us the first amendment did not intend to create a radical separation of church and state that many advocate today. The day after Congress adopted the first amendment, they sent a message to George Washington. They asked him to declare a day of Thanksgiving to God.

Congress wanted to show America’s appreciation for the opportunity to create a new government in peace and tranquility.

The founders did not intend for God to be separate from our official acts. The founders just did not want a national denomination, such as in England.

They did not want an established church, an established church would take away religious liberty.
They did not want an established church that could force people to worship against their will or support it with private tax dollars.

Many say the founding fathers didn’t believe in God and weren’t Christian. They even go on to say that George Washington wasn’t a Christian and never went to church and never prayed.

This is completely wrong. In the early days of the United States, the whole of society centered around the local church. Most of the early pioneers attended church regularly or semi-regularly. Practically all our early schools were church sponsored, thus the children’s education was based on religion, as was George Washington.

Available in Kindle and other ebook formats.

Jefferson’s Influence on William and Mary College and the University of Virginia

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As stated in David Barton’s book “Jefferson Lies“, the following excerpt exemplifies how Thomas Jefferson actually felt when it came to incorporating religious doctrine into education.

In 1779, Jefferson introduced legislation to modify the school – an accomplishment known as the Jefferson Reorganization. According to Professor Leonard Levy: Jefferson’s first proposal on higher education came in 1779. His Bill for the Amending of the Constitution of the College of William and Mary stated that the college consisted of “one school of sacred theology, with two professorships therein, to wit, one for teaching the Hebrew tongue, and expounding the Holy Scriptures; and the other for explaining the commonplaces of Divinity and controversies with heretics.” … Jefferson proposed to abolish … the school of theology with its professorships of religion.  Did Jefferson actually propose abolishing “the school of theology with its professorships of religion”? Apparently so, for Jefferson himself acknowledged, “I effected, during my residence in Williamsburg that year, a change in the organization of that institution by abolishing … the two professorships of Divinity.”  So it appears that Professor Levy was right – that Jefferson did seek to secularize higher education. At least, it appears that way until one reads the rest of Jefferson’s own account of his actions, and then it becomes evident that his intention was exactly the opposite. Jefferson explained: The College of William and Mary was an establishment purely of the Church of England [i.e., the Anglicans]; the Visitors [Regents] were required to be all of that Church; the professors to subscribe it’s thirty-nine [doctrinal] Articles; its students to learn its Catechism; and one of its fundamental objects was declared to be to raise up ministers for that church. The religious jealousies, therefore, of all the Dissenters [those from other denominations] took alarm lest this might give an ascendancy to the Anglican sect. Jefferson had abolished the School of Divinity because it was solely an arm of the state-established Anglican Church, and he wanted to open the college to greater involvement from “the Dissenters” – those from other Christian denominations such as Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, Quakers, and so Further evidence that Jefferson’s reorganization of the college was not motivated by any notion of secularism was the stipulation within his plan that “the said professors shall likewise appoint from time to time a missionary of approved veracity to the several tribes of Indians.” (In that day, missionaries, like ministers, taught both religious and academic subjects, and most schools were headed by ministers or missionaries.) Jefferson was not against Christian education, nor was he seeking to secularize it; he simply opposed favoring the Anglican Church over all others, and for this reason, abolished the Anglican Professorship of Divinity of Wiliam and Mary.

Four decades later, Jefferson sought to ensure that the University of Virginia would reflect the same denominational nonpreferentialism that he had repeatedly promoted throughout his life. He therefore reported to the state authorities that chartered the university: In conformity with the principles of our Constitution which places all sects of religion on an equal footing, with the jealousies of the different sects in guarding that equality from encroachment and surprise; and with the sentiments of the legislature in favor of freedom of religion manifested on former occasions, we have proposed no Professor of Divinity; and the rather as the proofs of the being of a God – the Creator, Preserver, and Supreme Ruler of the Universe – the Author of all the relations of morality and of the laws and obligations these infer – will be within the province of the Professor of Ethics; to which adding the developments of these moral obligations of those in which all sects agree, with a knowledge of the languages Hebrew, Greek, and Latin, a basis will be formed common to all sects. Proceeding thus far without offence to the Constitution, we have thought it proper at this point to leave every sect to provide as they think fittest the means of further instruction in their own peculiar tenets.  Jefferson and the Board of Visitors (regents) decided that there should be no specific Professor of Divinity since it might give the impression that the university favored the denomination with which the professor was affiliated. But this certainly did not mean that the university would be secular or have no religious instruction. To the contrary, Jefferson simply transferred the responsibility of teaching “the proofs of the being of a God, the Creator, Preserver, and Supreme Ruler of the Universe, the Author of all the relations of morality and of the laws and obligations these infer” –– the things that a professor of Divinity would normally teach – to the Professor of Ethics. So religious instruction definitely would occur. Jefferson also reported: It is supposed probable that a building of somewhat more size in the middle of the grounds may be called for in time, in which may be rooms for religious worship, under such impartial regulations as the Visitors shall prescribe … Despite Jefferson’s unambiguous declarations in these provisions, critics nevertheless claimed that the university was anti-religious. 

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The blogger has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of young living oils

Improve your health through essential oils

 

a lutheran church against a sunny blue sky.

The day after Congress adopted the first amendment, they sent a message to George Washington. They asked him to declare a day of Thanksgiving to God.

Congress wanted to show America’s appreciation for the opportunity to create a new government in peace and tranquility.

The founders did not intend for God to be separate from our official acts. The founders just did not want a national denomination, such as in England.

They did not want an established church, an established church would take away religious liberty.
They did not want an established church that could force people to worship against their will or support it with private tax dollars.

Many say the founding fathers didn’t believe in God and weren’t Christian. They even go on to say that George Washington wasn’t a Christian and never went to church and never prayed.

This is completely wrong. In the early days of the United States, the whole of society centered around the local church. Most of the early pioneers attended church regularly or semi-regularly. Practically all our early schools were church sponsored, thus, the children’s education was based on religion, as was George Washington.

Available in both Kindle and other Ebook formats.

The Potomac River

The Potomac River, known as “The Nation’s River”, is 383 miles long and forms a natural boundary along  the borders of Maryland, Washington, Virginia and West Virginia.

Passing through or near such historic places as Cumberland Maryland, Martinsburg, Harper’s Ferry, and Washington D.C. It is rich in history and heritage.

Cumberland Maryland

Much of our early nations history took place along it’s banks. Our first president, George Washington was not only born in the Potomac basin, but spent most of his life here as well.

Many of the battles of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, as well as the civil war were fought in the watershed of this beautiful river. It provided a valuable route to lands to the west when they were opened for settlement, in the early days it was the only passage into the interior of our nation.

It not only provided a route into the unknown land west of where civilization had advanced , it’s waters and surrounding area provide food, shelter and clothing to the early settlers.The land was full of wild game and the river supplied fish.

Potomac River

Stretching from the hills of West Virginia where it links with the Shenandoah River it meanders  to the Atlantic Ocean, it links coal miners in the mountains to the urban residents of Washington D.C.

Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature,landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt,the Canary Islands,much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed and applied what he has learned to solving the many issues facing not only the United States, but the world as well.

Common Sense solutions to complex problems.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website.www.commonsensejourneys.com


You can also follow him on your Kindle.

Journeys Thru Life

There are many paths one can take in this journey of life.Many believe our spiritual journey begins at a certain point in life, after some sort of life changing event that makes us stand up and think. Our spiritual journey begins long before that, even before birth.It began at creation and continues to this day and into the future, the life changing events are only wake-up calls that suddenly jolt us into realizing there is more to life than we may be aware of.