Should We Play a Religious song At A Football Game?

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

Someone mentioned that during a college football game in Florida, on Veteran’s Day, the band played Amazing Grace and played “Taps”.

They thought it was inappropriate.

I remember, not too many years ago, something like that would have been not only appropriate but expected.

This just goes to show how far our once great country has declined., all in the name of political correctness.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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I May Not Agree With What You Say

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

I may not agree with what you day, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

How often have we heard or read this famous quote?

This quote is often attributed to Voltaire, however, the actual quote was made by Evelyn Beatrice Hall who wrote her biography of Voltaire, “The Life of Voltaire.”

I can’t help but think the first amendment to the constitution in our Bill of Rights was patterned after this thought.

In essence, the first amendment states, that we all have a right to say whatever we want. It is guaranteed. Whether we should say whatever we want is an entirely different subject and should be left to a matter of discretion.

But, doesn’t this also fit into the discussion as to whether our rights come from God or government?

Would a power hungry leader of a country ever submit to this, that we have a right to say whatever we want regardless if we agree with him or not?

I would venture to say that 99% of the time, they would not.

Only a Supreme Being who grants every soul Free Will would be willing and capable to give the individual such power.

A government bureaucrat would never even consider doing such a thing.

I believe that because our founders believed in a Supreme Being and his authority over us, and they wanted to limit the power of government because of the knowledge they had of abuse of government on the European scene, their purpose was to make a world that was based on spirituality and not political rhetoric.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Korean War Memorial in Washington D.C.

Photography by Gary Wonning

The Korean War began on June 25, 1950  when some 75,000 soldiers from the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south. 

Please click on the photos for articles and photos relating to the era.

By July, American troops had entered the war on South Korea’s behalf. As far as American officials were concerned, it was a war against the forces of international communism itself. They felt, an rightfully so that communism could not be allowed to spread across the world, it had to be stopped.

Unlike World War II and Vietnam, the Korean War did not get much media attention in the United States. It became the forgotten war.  The most famous representation of the war in popular culture is the television series “M*A*S*H,” which was set in a field hospital in South Korea. 

Many feared it was the first step in a communist campaign to take over the world. For this reason, nonintervention was not considered an option by many top decision makers. (In fact, in April 1950, a National Security Council report known as NSC-68 had recommended that the United States use military force to “contain” communist expansionism anywhere it seemed to be occurring, “regardless of the intrinsic strategic or economic value of the lands in question.”)

The Korean War was relatively short but exceptionally bloody. Nearly 5 million people died. More than half of these–about 10 percent of Korea’s prewar population–were civilians. (This rate of civilian casualties was higher than World War II’s and Vietnam’s.) Almost 40,000 Americans died in action in Korea, and more than 100,000 were wounded.

A truce was obtained, with neither side winning, the start of an illadivised trend in American warfare that continues today. 

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

It’s Great To Be An American

The Vietnam War Memorial in Washington DC.

Written by Gary Wonning

If there is anything good that will come out of the last eight years of turmoil, I believe it will be the fact that many Americans have become more aware of the value of our constitution and way of life.

Many of us have forgotten how lucky we re to live in this great land of ours. We forget how many around the world still live under oppression and poverty, the likes of which even the poorest in this country can’t imagine.

Often times, we Americans forget how lucky we are to live in this great land of ours and it takes someone from another country to remind us

Many times I have tried to remove myself from the animosities in the world today, but I am always drawn back by something someone from another country says or does about our country.

On Christmas Eve a friend of mine, someone who normally doesn’t express his feelings, made the statement about how much he loves America.

It was the perfect time to be once again reminded of how fortunate all of us are to live in this great land.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

The World War Two Memorial in Washington D.C.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written and photographed by Gary Wonning

Please click on the photos for some beautiful patriotic photographs!

The World War 2 Memorial in Washington D.C.

Dedicated to the brave men and women who sacrificed much to preserve our freedom

Located on the Washington Mall, it is something every American should see.

The Washington Memorial in the background

D Day, the end of the war in Europe

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Albert Pike: Moral Truths

 

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

The great Masonic philosopher/writer Albert Pike once said:

Moral Truths are absolute, like the principles of Geometry. The permanent real truths said Pythagoras were the laws and constancies perceived or discovered through study and reason. In contrast, said Aristotle, virtue is but the habit or practice of doing the right thing, once it is discovered.

Truth exists, it is for us to discover whether through reason, practice or both.

Photography Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Albert Pike: The Imortality of the Soul

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

 

Albert Pike, Masonic historian and writer’s thoughts on the Immortality of the soul.

The ancients asserted that the soul is immortal, as do most Freemasons today. Plato, through the voice of Socrates, advanced the proposition, as did Pythagoras before them.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome