Time Is A Continuum

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

Written by Gary Wonning

Time is a continuum 

Time is continuous, it never ends. There is no beginning or end, time is a continuous cycle that exists on different planes or levels of existence. 

I often compare the different periods of times to a radio, when we listen to a radio, to find different radio stations and different forms of music and entertainment, we turn the dial, or these days , we push scan. By doing this, we are able to dial in the station and type of music we desire.

In life we do the same. To live the life our soul desires, we dial in the plane of existence and reality that will give us the life experiences we desire to grow and learn the lessons we come to earth to experience.

There are an infinite number of planes of existence, or vibrational planes. In order to change our plane of existence, all we need to do is to change our focus.

Ethereal time refers to the plane of existence we call heaven, paradise, Ultimate Reality, or one of many other terms we humans associate with the great beyond.

It exists alongside all the thousands of other planes of existence that are present in the cosmos, and which can be accessed by changing our vibrational patterns. 

These planes of existence can be accessed by meditation, hypnosis, or other forms of mind altering methods.

The Source of life, God, or Chi Energy, is present in one and all of the vibrational fields. This field is also parallel to all the other levels of existence, just as all levels, past,present, and future are all just parallel levels that are existing simultaneously, there is no beginning or end.

The past is parallel to the present, and the present is a reflection of decisions made in the past. Only the present reflects the future by the decisions that are made in the present. 

In reality, all the planes of existence are parallel, past, present, and future, it is for the individual soul to determine which plane of existence it will focus on.We don’t, as some believe cross over a bridge to another world, we just change our focus.

We are drawn to the light of a new reality and thus begin a new existence, if we don’t focus on a particular energetic plane, we wander aimlessly through the universe until we determine how and where we want to spend the next human life, just as in life, we sometimes wander aimlessly until we find our true passion.

As stated previously, everything is happening simultaneously, what we experience and see is what our consciousness is focusing on, to change our life, we just need to change our focus. 

There is no right or wrong life, we don’t need to do any certain mission, only the mission we feel in our heart is right for us. What we may or may not have done in a previous life has no bearing on this life, our mission this time around is normally entirely different.

For those souls that may remember a life when they were instrumental in a major change in society, this can be a hard lesson to sometimes understand, they often feel an obligation, when in fact their obligations were fulfilled previously, maybe this time, it’s their turn to learn for their own evolvement. 

We don’t always come here to save the world, it can be someone else’s turn. 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Art Prints

 

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Saint Thomas: An island Of Diverse Scenery

photos of the US virgin islands

The beautiful Islands of Saint Thomas and Saint John

Written and photographed by Gary Wonning

An ice cream store along the route back from Magans Bay

A view of Magans Bay

The cruise port of Charlotte-Amalie, taken from Drakes Seat.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Photography Prints

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

EARLY PATRIOT WAS ‘PESSIMISTIC’ ABOUT AMERICAN EXPERIMENT

Many of our early patriots were skeptical as too how long the republic could last.

    

Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames

He sat next to George Washington in the pew at St. Paul’s Chapel in New York during the religious service following Washington’s presidential inauguration. He helped ratify the U.S. Constitution. His name was Fisher Ames.

Fisher Ames was a Congressman from Massachusetts where, on Aug. 20, 1789, he proposed as the wording of the First Amendment (Annals of Congress, 1:766): “Congress shall make no law establishing religion, or to prevent the free exercise thereof, or to infringe the rights of conscience.”

Fisher Ames contrasted monarchy with a republic (Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Essays,” Second Series, chp. 7– “Politics,” 1844, p. 97; Library of America, 1983): “Monarchy is a merchantman, which sails well, but will sometimes strike on a rock, and go to the bottom; whilst a republic is a raft, which would never sink, but then your feet are always in water.”

Of America’s republic, Fisher Ames wrote an article titled “Monitor,” published in the New England Palladium of Boston, 1804 (Works of Fisher Ames, compiled by a number of his friends, Boston: T.B. Wait & Co., 1809, p. 272): “We now set out with our experimental project, exactly where Rome failed with hers. We now begin, where she ended.”

Warning against the temptation to increase government, Fisher Ames stated in “Speeches on Mr. Madison’s Resolutions” (“Works of Fisher Ames,” compiled by a number of his friends, Boston: T.B. Wait & Co., 1809, p. 48): “To control trade by law, instead of leaving it to the better management of the merchants … (is) to play the tyrant in the counting house, and in directing the private expenses of our citizens, are employments equally unworthy of discussion.”

At the Massachusetts Convention, Jan. 15, 1788, Fisher Ames warned that democracy without morals would eventually reduce the nation to the basest of human passions, swallowing freedom: “A democracy is a volcano which conceals the fiery materials of its own destruction.”

Fisher Ames commented in “The Dangers of American Liberty,” 1805 (published in “Works of Fisher Ames: with a selection from his speeches and correspondence,” Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1854, pp. 349): “The known propensity of a democracy is to licentiousness, which the ambitious call, and the ignorant believe to be, liberty.”

“Licentiousness” is defined as: sexually unrestrained; lascivious; libertine; lewd; unrestrained by law or general morality; lawless; immoral. … Synonyms: abandoned, profligate.

As Fisher Ames had predicted, the state he was a Congressman from, Massachusetts, has moved in the direction of licentiousness. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, in the 2003 case of Goodridge necessitated the state recognize same-sex marriage. Since then, the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender agenda has been taught in schools with sexually explicit materials. Those not embracing this agenda are discriminated against; employees fired; businesses sued; attorneys disbarred; hospitals made to provide sex change services; doctors exposing health risks are labeled; adoption agencies penalized; domestic violence increased; and churches demonized.

The freedoms of religion and speech have diminished for those holding biblical morals. It is as those who have come out of the closet are intent to shove others into it!

Russell Kirk described Fisher Ames in “The Conservative Mind: From Burke to Eliot” (Washington D.C.: Regnery Publishing, Inc., 2001, chapter 3, p. 81-85): “As time runs on, Ames grows more intense. Democracy cannot last. … When property is snatched from hand to hand … then society submits cravenly to the immorality of rule by the sword. … Of all the terrors of democracy, the worst is its destruction of moral habits. ‘A democratic society will soon find its morals … the surly companion of its licentious joys.’ … Is there no check upon these excesses? …”

Russell Kirk continued: “The press supplies an endless stimulus to popular imagination and passion; the press lives upon heat and coarse drama and incessant restlessness. ‘It has inspired ignorance with presumption.’ … ‘Constitutions,’ says Ames, ‘are but paper; society is the substratum of government.’ … Like Samuel Johnson, (Ames) finds the key to political decency in private morality.”

Aaron McLeod wrote in “Great Conservative Minds: A Condensation of Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind” (October 2005, Alabama Policy Institute, Birmingham, AL, chp. 3, p. 9-10}: “Ames was pessimistic about the American experiment because he doubted there were sufficient numbers of men with the moral courage and charisma to preserve the country from the passions of the multitudes and the demagogues who master them. He was convinced that the people as a body cannot reason and are easily swayed by clever speakers and political agents. In his words, ‘few can reason, all can feel.’ … Democracy could not last, Ames thundered, ‘for despotism lies at the door; when the tyranny of the majority leads to chaos, society will submit to rule by the sword.’”

Aaron McLeod continued: “To Ames, what doomed the American experiment was the democratic destruction of morals. … Ames believed that justice and morality in America would fail, and popular rule cannot support justice, without which moral habits fall away. Neither the free press nor paper constitutions could safe-guard order from these excesses, for the first is merely a stimulus to popular passion and imagination, while the other is a thin bulwark against corruption. When old prescription and tradition are dismissed, only naked force matters.”

Fisher Ames’ views were similar to President George Washington, who stated in his farewell address, Sept. 19, 1796: “With slight shades of difference, you have the same Religion. … Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness. … The mere Politician … ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. …”

Washington continued: “Let us with caution indulge the supposition, that morality can be maintained without religion. Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. … Virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. … Who that is a sincere friend to it, can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

George Washington died Dec. 14, 1799. Fisher Ames delivered a eulogy “An Oration on the Sublime Virtues of General George Washington,” Feb. 8, 1800, at Boston’s Old South Meeting-House, before the Lieutenant Governor, the Council, and both branches of the Massachusetts Legislature (Boston: Young & Minns, 1800, p. 23): “Our liberty depends on our education, our laws, and habits. … It is founded on morals and religion, whose authority reigns in the heart, and on the influence all these produce on public opinion before that opinion governs rulers.”

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

Masonry and the United States

 

It is my belief masonry prepared what is now the United States to be the last and greatest bastion of freedom on earth. Many years before Christopher Columbus discovered America, the last Knights Templars, descendants of a long line of Masonic like orders, possibly came here after fleeing France because of persecution.

There is strong evidence that several refuge Knights Templars escaped France and death by first fleeing to Scotland and then to North America. Evidence found in the northeastern United States, as well as Canada, and even into such places as modern day Minnesota and Illinois substantiate this.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

An American’s Creed

 

American’s creed

I do not choose to be a common man, it is my right to be uncommon.

I seek the opportunity to develop whatever talents God gave me, Not security.

I do not wish to be a melt citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me.

I want to take the calculated risk to dream and to build. To fail and to succeed.

I refuse to barter incentive for a dole. I prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence, the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of utopia.

I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my duty for a handout.

I will never cower before any earthly master nor bend to any threat.

It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid, to think and act myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations and to face the world boldly and say this with God’s help, I have done all this.

This is what it means to be an American.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Seeing the Future : Our Country in Conflict

At an early age, about five or six, I remember standing in front of our farmhouse, looking east and seeing our nation’s capital in flames.

I was living in Indiana at the time, this was the early fifties and being quite young, I hardly knew what Washington D.C. was. I just knew that sometime in the future, which I perceived to be sometime around the turn of the century, about 2007 or 2008 I knew there would be much conflict, and freedom would hang in the balance. 

At the time I never understood and even though it stuck in my mind, I never really thought too much about it.

Again, in the 1980s, I was reminded by a well-known psychic that the turn of the century would be a trying time for our nation. She said much of the conflict would arise from people not only not instilling common values in their children, but also, even though some of the children were raised correctly, many would stray from the path.

Even then, it didn’t really soak in what spirit was trying to tell me, she said I would be ok as long as I stayed out of the major cities.

The time is here, and I now understand, we, as a nation have done much to undermine our security and freedom. We have forgotten the values that made this country great. The only way to preserve our nation is to return to those principles that our country was founded on and lead our founders to establish the greatest country the world has even known.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Battle of Gettysbutrg

 

An interesting article on the battle of Gettysburg, written by Bill Federer.

Washington, D.C., was in a panic! 72,000 Confederate troops were just sixty miles away near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. After the Confederate victory at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Robert E. Lee was under a time deadline. Mounting casualties of the war were causing Lincoln’s popularity to fall, so if Lee could get a quick victory at Gettysburg, he could pressure Lincoln to a truce.

But this window of opportunity was fast closing, as Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant was about to capture Vicksburg on the Mississippi, which would divide the Confederacy and free up thousands of Union troops to fight Lee in the east.

Unfortunately for Lee, his tremendously successful general, “Stonewall” Jackson, had died two months earlier, having been mistakenly shot by his own men. On the Union side, Lincoln replaced Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker with Maj. Gen. George Meade to command the 94,000 men of the Union Army of the Potomac.

The Battle of Gettysburg began July 1, 1863. After two days of intense combat, with ammunition running low, General Robert E. Lee ordered a direct attack. Confederate General James Longstreet disagreed with Lee’s plan, resulting in his delayed advance till after all the Confederate artillery had been spent, leaving no cover fire.

Historians speculate that if General Longstreet had made a timely attack, the Confederates may have won the day. As it happened, 12,500 Confederate soldiers marched across a mile of open field without artillery cover to make “Pickett’s Charge” directly into the Union position at Cemetery Ridge. An hour of murderous fire and bloody hand-to-hand combat ensued, followed by the Confederates being pushed back.

The Battle of Gettysburg ended July 3, 1863, with over 50,000 casualties.

The next day, Vicksburg surrendered to General Grant, giving the Union Army control of the Mississippi River. When news reached London, all hopes of Europe recognizing the Confederacy were lost. For the next two years, the South was on the defensive.

On July 5, 1863, President Lincoln and his son visited General Daniel E. Sickles, who had his leg blown off at Gettysburg. General James F. Rusling recorded that when General Sickles asked Lincoln if was anxious before the Battle, Lincoln answered: “No, I was not; some of my Cabinet and many others in Washington were, but I had no fears. …”

Lincoln continued: “In the pinch of your campaign up there, when everybody seemed panic-stricken, and nobody could tell what was going to happen, oppressed by the gravity of our affairs, I went to my room one day, and I locked the door, and got down on my knees before Almighty God, and prayed to Him mightily for victory at Gettysburg. I told Him that this was His war, and our cause His cause, but we couldn’t stand another Fredericksburg or Chancellorsville. And I then and there made a solemn vow to Almighty God, that if He would stand by our boys at Gettysburg, I would stand by Him. …”

Lincoln added: “And He did stand by you boys, and I will stand by Him. And after that (I don’t know how it was, and I can’t explain it), soon a sweet comfort crept into my soul that God Almighty had taken the whole business into his own hands and that things would go all right at Gettysburg.”

Discover more of Bill Federer’s eye-opening books and videos in the WND Superstore!

Twelve days after the Battle of Gettysburg, July 15, 1863, Lincoln proclaimed a day of prayer: “It is meet and right to recognize and confess the presence of the Almighty Father and the power of His hand equally in these triumphs and in these sorrows. … I invite the people of the United States to … render the homage due to the Divine Majesty for the wonderful things He has done in the nation’s behalf and invoke the influence of His Holy Spirit to subdue the anger which has produced and so long sustained a needless and cruel rebellion.”

In his Gettysburg Address, Nov. 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln ended: “We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Years later at the Gettysburg Battlefield, President Franklin D. Roosevelt stated May 30, 1934: “On these hills of Gettysburg two brave armies of Americans once met in contest. … Since those days, two subsequent wars, both with foreign Nations, have measurably … softened the ancient passions. It has been left to us of this generation to see the healing made permanent.”

In his third inaugural address, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said, Jan. 20, 1941: “The spirit of America … is the product of centuries … born in the multitudes of those who came from many lands. … The democratic aspiration is no mere recent phase in human history. It is human history. … Its vitality was written into our own Mayflower Compact, into the Declaration of Independence, into the Constitution of the United States, into the Gettysburg Address. … If the spirit of America were killed, even though the nation’s body … lived on, the America we know would have perished.”