The World War Two Memorial in Washington D.C.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written and photographed by Gary Wonning

Please click on the photos for some beautiful patriotic photographs!

The World War 2 Memorial in Washington D.C.

Dedicated to the brave men and women who sacrificed much to preserve our freedom

Located on the Washington Mall, it is something every American should see.

The Washington Memorial in the background

D Day, the end of the war in Europe

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

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The Vietnam War Memorial

The Vietnam War Memorial, dedicated to the brave men and women who fought for freedom in southeast Asia under extreme conditions.

photo of Vietnam war memorial

The Vietnam War Memorial with the Washington monument in the background

The war became a political football, being run by Washington bureaucrats, instead of the military, it became a hopeless war

In spite of the rhetoric, because of what these brave men and women did, Vietnam is abetter place toady than it was before we became involved there.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

EARLY PATRIOT WAS ‘PESSIMISTIC’ ABOUT AMERICAN EXPERIMENT

Many of our early patriots were skeptical as too how long the republic could last.

    

Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames

He sat next to George Washington in the pew at St. Paul’s Chapel in New York during the religious service following Washington’s presidential inauguration. He helped ratify the U.S. Constitution. His name was Fisher Ames.

Fisher Ames was a Congressman from Massachusetts where, on Aug. 20, 1789, he proposed as the wording of the First Amendment (Annals of Congress, 1:766): “Congress shall make no law establishing religion, or to prevent the free exercise thereof, or to infringe the rights of conscience.”

Fisher Ames contrasted monarchy with a republic (Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Essays,” Second Series, chp. 7– “Politics,” 1844, p. 97; Library of America, 1983): “Monarchy is a merchantman, which sails well, but will sometimes strike on a rock, and go to the bottom; whilst a republic is a raft, which would never sink, but then your feet are always in water.”

Of America’s republic, Fisher Ames wrote an article titled “Monitor,” published in the New England Palladium of Boston, 1804 (Works of Fisher Ames, compiled by a number of his friends, Boston: T.B. Wait & Co., 1809, p. 272): “We now set out with our experimental project, exactly where Rome failed with hers. We now begin, where she ended.”

Warning against the temptation to increase government, Fisher Ames stated in “Speeches on Mr. Madison’s Resolutions” (“Works of Fisher Ames,” compiled by a number of his friends, Boston: T.B. Wait & Co., 1809, p. 48): “To control trade by law, instead of leaving it to the better management of the merchants … (is) to play the tyrant in the counting house, and in directing the private expenses of our citizens, are employments equally unworthy of discussion.”

At the Massachusetts Convention, Jan. 15, 1788, Fisher Ames warned that democracy without morals would eventually reduce the nation to the basest of human passions, swallowing freedom: “A democracy is a volcano which conceals the fiery materials of its own destruction.”

Fisher Ames commented in “The Dangers of American Liberty,” 1805 (published in “Works of Fisher Ames: with a selection from his speeches and correspondence,” Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1854, pp. 349): “The known propensity of a democracy is to licentiousness, which the ambitious call, and the ignorant believe to be, liberty.”

“Licentiousness” is defined as: sexually unrestrained; lascivious; libertine; lewd; unrestrained by law or general morality; lawless; immoral. … Synonyms: abandoned, profligate.

As Fisher Ames had predicted, the state he was a Congressman from, Massachusetts, has moved in the direction of licentiousness. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, in the 2003 case of Goodridge necessitated the state recognize same-sex marriage. Since then, the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender agenda has been taught in schools with sexually explicit materials. Those not embracing this agenda are discriminated against; employees fired; businesses sued; attorneys disbarred; hospitals made to provide sex change services; doctors exposing health risks are labeled; adoption agencies penalized; domestic violence increased; and churches demonized.

The freedoms of religion and speech have diminished for those holding biblical morals. It is as those who have come out of the closet are intent to shove others into it!

Russell Kirk described Fisher Ames in “The Conservative Mind: From Burke to Eliot” (Washington D.C.: Regnery Publishing, Inc., 2001, chapter 3, p. 81-85): “As time runs on, Ames grows more intense. Democracy cannot last. … When property is snatched from hand to hand … then society submits cravenly to the immorality of rule by the sword. … Of all the terrors of democracy, the worst is its destruction of moral habits. ‘A democratic society will soon find its morals … the surly companion of its licentious joys.’ … Is there no check upon these excesses? …”

Russell Kirk continued: “The press supplies an endless stimulus to popular imagination and passion; the press lives upon heat and coarse drama and incessant restlessness. ‘It has inspired ignorance with presumption.’ … ‘Constitutions,’ says Ames, ‘are but paper; society is the substratum of government.’ … Like Samuel Johnson, (Ames) finds the key to political decency in private morality.”

Aaron McLeod wrote in “Great Conservative Minds: A Condensation of Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind” (October 2005, Alabama Policy Institute, Birmingham, AL, chp. 3, p. 9-10}: “Ames was pessimistic about the American experiment because he doubted there were sufficient numbers of men with the moral courage and charisma to preserve the country from the passions of the multitudes and the demagogues who master them. He was convinced that the people as a body cannot reason and are easily swayed by clever speakers and political agents. In his words, ‘few can reason, all can feel.’ … Democracy could not last, Ames thundered, ‘for despotism lies at the door; when the tyranny of the majority leads to chaos, society will submit to rule by the sword.’”

Aaron McLeod continued: “To Ames, what doomed the American experiment was the democratic destruction of morals. … Ames believed that justice and morality in America would fail, and popular rule cannot support justice, without which moral habits fall away. Neither the free press nor paper constitutions could safe-guard order from these excesses, for the first is merely a stimulus to popular passion and imagination, while the other is a thin bulwark against corruption. When old prescription and tradition are dismissed, only naked force matters.”

Fisher Ames’ views were similar to President George Washington, who stated in his farewell address, Sept. 19, 1796: “With slight shades of difference, you have the same Religion. … Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness. … The mere Politician … ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. …”

Washington continued: “Let us with caution indulge the supposition, that morality can be maintained without religion. Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. … Virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. … Who that is a sincere friend to it, can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

George Washington died Dec. 14, 1799. Fisher Ames delivered a eulogy “An Oration on the Sublime Virtues of General George Washington,” Feb. 8, 1800, at Boston’s Old South Meeting-House, before the Lieutenant Governor, the Council, and both branches of the Massachusetts Legislature (Boston: Young & Minns, 1800, p. 23): “Our liberty depends on our education, our laws, and habits. … It is founded on morals and religion, whose authority reigns in the heart, and on the influence all these produce on public opinion before that opinion governs rulers.”

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

The Washington Monument, Washington D.C.

 

During a recent trip to Washington D.C., I hope the pleasure of visiting the Washington Monument.

Fashioned like obelisks of the ancient world, most especially Egypt. It can be seen from miles around.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standing Tall on the Washington Mall, it is a beacon for freedom around the world

In the midst of a major city, it is a symbol of America’s greatness and culture

As seen from the World War Two Memorial.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s Make America Great Again

 

Let’s Make America Great Again

We have a president that was elected on the premise that we needed to make America great again.

How do we do that, how does every one of us, regardless of our station in life do what is necessary to make this great country once again live up to its highest potential? 

Obviously, not everyone can stand behind a podium and speak to thousands, most can’t write or influence thousands of  people through their actions or words. 

They don’t have to, all the individual needs to do is to try and set a good example for those in their circle of influence, those people they come in contact with every day, family and friends.

No one is perfect and we don’t always speak and act in the proper manner, but that shouldn’t stop us from trying, as long as we have good intentions, our motives are valid. 

Each and every one of us should live up to the morals, values, and principles that made this country great, those Judeo-Christian values this country was founded on and have supported our country through the ages.

We don’t need to influence millions of citizens if each and every one of us only influence a few people, our actions will have a ripple effect that will be unstoppable.

In order to make our country great again, we need to make ourselves great again.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonry and Dogma

An Excerpt from the best selling book by Robert Lomas: The Lost Keys of Masonry

Freemasonry, by forbidding religious discussion at its meetings will not allow a Masonic theological doctrine to develop.’ I found this an important statement, as it goes well beyond simply forbidding the discussion of religion and politics, which had been in force since the adoption of Anderson’s Constitutions. It shows an awareness of Masonic dogma being inadvertently created if points of religious agreement were discussed in lodge. My personal experience of dogma, at the hands of various Sunday School teachers, had left me highly sensitive to the danger of it. Here I now found a strong statement of the religious tolerance at the heart of Masonic regulation.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonry and the United States

 

It is my belief masonry prepared what is now the United States to be the last and greatest bastion of freedom on earth. Many years before Christopher Columbus discovered America, the last Knights Templars, descendants of a long line of Masonic like orders, possibly came here after fleeing France because of persecution.

There is strong evidence that several refuge Knights Templars escaped France and death by first fleeing to Scotland and then to North America. Evidence found in the northeastern United States, as well as Canada, and even into such places as modern day Minnesota and Illinois substantiate this.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome