Growing Up in the 50s: A Social Life And Milking

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Sometimes it was hard to squeeze a social life into the farm scene. Going to the basketball games was a required course in school, missing a ball game was out of the question, a person could get banned from his community from such an atrocious act.

When the game was played at a school several miles from home, it was a real challenge.

There was only about forty-five minutes from the time I would arrive home from school until the bus would leave from the school to go to the game.

That didn’t leave much time for milking thirty head of cows.

But I got’er done. The stanchions held four cows and we had two milkers. So I would run two cows in, wash them, put the milkers on, feed them, bring two more in, prepare them, take the milkers off the first two and put them on the second two and repeat the process until I finished.

I could milk thirty cows in thirty minutes. At these stressed times, the cows didn’t give much milk, the milkers weren’t on long enough, and they didn’t eat much either. But they made up for it the next morning.

You couldn’t do that twice in a row or the cows would get mastitis, but when there is an emergency such as getting to a ball game, you gotta do what you gotta do.

Art Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Advertisements

Fisherman’s Village Punta Gorda Florida

Photography Prints

 

Fisherman’s Village is a waterfront shopping, entertainment, and resort complex located along Charlotte Harbor in Punta Gorda Florida. It includes over 30 shops and restaurants as well as a resort with 47 timeshare villas on the second floor.

The original pier was built in 1928,and was known as the Maud Street City Dock, which was built to repalce the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad dock at King Street.

 

Today many shops and restaurants line the wharf, Harpoon Harry’s, Hurricane Charleys, and the Fish Market are three of the most popular eating establishments.

Christmas decoration are everywhere, making it quite festive.

The Punta Gorda Fishing Company and the West Coast Fish Company began operating from the Maud Street dock, and later tenants included Gulf Coast Oil Company and Matt Week’s Boat Shop.

The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, who operated the previous dock, connected their track to serve the Maud Street dock via a spur that once served the Long Dock (the Punta Gorda Linear Park adjacent to Fisherman’s Village today runs along the former rail spur).

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

The Henry Ford Museum in Fort Myers Florida

Written and photography by Gary Wonning

Edison’s good friend Henry Ford purchased the adjoining property, “The Mangoes” from Robert Smith of New York in 1916. Ford’s craftsman style bungalow was built in 1911 by Smith.

Along with the Edison Museum, the Ford estate is appropriately decorated fo the Christmas season.

The Fords would come to Florida in the winter to be close to their good friends the Edisons. Not only did they socialize, but  Henry and Thomas spent many hours in Edison’s lab perfecting many inventions that improved the lives of most Americans.

Simply, but beautifully decorated, the Ford estate provides a pleasing atmosphere to finish an enjoyable evening.

Henry Ford himself greets you as you enter the grounds.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

 

Christmas at the Thomas Edison Museum In Fort Myers Florida

Photography Prints

 

The isn’t a better place to spend an evening during the Christmas season than at the Thomas Edison Museum in Fort Myers Florida

Containing more than a thousand varieties of plants from around the world, Edison’s botanical garden includes an African Sausage Tree and a 400 foot banyan tree. 

There are plants grown not only for personal pleasure, but for industrial purposes as well. 

His wife Mina designed  the Moonlight Garden and planted many flowers for their beauty.

Overlooking the Caloosahatchee River, the estate is a perfect place to watch a sunset

Edison Ford Winter Estates is a National Register Historic Site and received the Award of Excellence for restoration from both the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the National Garden Clubs, Inc. The site is a Florida Historic Landmark and has been designated as a National Historical Chemical Landmark by the American Chemical Society, the first site in the state of Florida to receive this honor.

Our evening tour began at 5:30. the perfect time to enjoy the Christmas decorations.

The Edison’s enjoyed many Christmas seasons here with their family and close friends, the Fords.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

A Spiritual Encounter In The Outback Of Australia

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

Written by Gary Wonning

Ubirr Rock is a sacred monolith in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory of Australia.

Ubirr Rock has several natural shelters that contain a collection of rock art, some thought to be tens of thousands of years old. The art depicts creation ancestors and animals from the area including barramundi, catfish, goannas, long neck turtles,wallabies and kangaroos.

Some of the paintings can date back as far as forty thousand years, with most having been done about two thousand years ago and many have been repainted several times.

The main gallery contains many examples of x-ray art and is probably the most photographed. Also is seen paintings of white men and Mimi spirits ( extraterrestrials) , so thin they can slip in and out of the cracks in the rocks.

A painting of a Thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, can be seen at the northern end of the gallery. This tiger  has been extinct in the area for about 2000 years, and attests to the antiquity of the paintings.

Rainbow Serpent Gallery

This is a woman only site, and is  the most sacred site at Ubirr, although this rule is often relaxed for non-indigenous tourists. This is the spot visited by the Rainbow Serpent or “Garranga’rreli”, during her path across the top end of Australia, during the Dreaming. As she crossed the land, she “sang” the rocks, plants, animals, and people into existence. This path, or songline is still a sacred path to the indigenous people who live in northern Australia.

From the top of Ubirr rock there is a panoramic view of the flood plains and escarpments.

It is from this idyllic view I experienced my most profound spiritual encounter.

Exiting from the bus that brought me here, I left the main trail and began walking around the back of the rock and started climbing the 100 ft. vertical wall, all the time carrying 40 lbs. of camera gear on my back.

As I began my ascent my reality began to change, I was no longer an American photographer visiting Australia, I was transformed into a native carefully climbing a vertical wall, placing each hand and foot in a strategic place, never pausing, but slowly climbing upward as I had done many times before. Always finding a tree, root or rock ledge enabling me to continue my climb, never pausing but slowly climbing upward in my search for truth.

Photography Prints

Reaching the top of this sacred Shrine in the middle of some of the most isolated land in the world I began to feel overwhelming love and peace and a sense of being home, I had returned to the Land of Oz.

As I lay on this sacred monument my mind began to pass through the veil of time, into a place from whence all things are seen, back in time, back to a previous millennium, back to the birth of Australia

I felt my consciousness leave my body and rise high above the earth. Looking down I could sense two realities, I had a sense of being high above the earth and looking down upon my lifeless body lying on the rocky cliff, I could observe a bird walking on my right arm, at the same time I was the lifeless body on the cliff, feeling and sensing that same bird walking across my arm.

As the land rose from the sea, the mountains began to form high above the plains; the Rainbow Serpent began to transform the land into a new world called Australius.

I suddenly re-entered my body and came back to the present reality, slightly dazed about what had just taken place. Gazing into my camera close by, I knew that someday when the time was right, I would write about this event.

Upon my return to the bus, Mark, our Aborigine driver informed me that I had been on sacred ground, where no one is allowed without permission. There is a $5,000 fine for that. He then looked at me, winked and said” But you had permission!”

Needless to say, the trip back to Jabiru was quite an experience, I felt like I was coming down from a tremendous high, someone remarked and wondered what I drugs I had taken. I have never taken drugs in my life, but there is nothing that could equal this feeling. The rest of the day I was rather worthless as I tried to absorb what had just transpired! I had been told several months earlier that July 7th would be a special day, being in the outback, I hadn’t even realized that today was July 7th, until now! How interesting, July 7th is the day of the Roswell crash, 42 years to the day!

What a perfect ending to our last night of camping, day broke with a Wallaby sauntering about our camp site.

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The World War Two Memorial in Washington D.C.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written and photographed by Gary Wonning

Please click on the photos for some beautiful patriotic photographs!

The World War 2 Memorial in Washington D.C.

Dedicated to the brave men and women who sacrificed much to preserve our freedom

Located on the Washington Mall, it is something every American should see.

The Washington Memorial in the background

D Day, the end of the war in Europe

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Puerto Rico: Inside El Morro

photo of El Morro

The beautiful island of Puerto Rico

Written and photographed by Gary Wonning

Castillo San Felipe del Morro also known as Fuerte San Felipe del Morro or Castillo del Morro, is a 16th-century citadel located in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

 

Designed to protect the harbor of San Juan, El Morro  was built on the northwestern most point of the islet of Old San Juan, and was named on honor of Philip 11 of Spain.

The island was attackedmany times in it’ short history and these cannon balls had to be handy.

Looking out a window of the fort, the town of San Juan is next door.

A moment of quiet contemplation 

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.