The Past Comes to Life at Tuzigoot, American Indian Village Near Cottonwood Arizona.

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The portals of Sedona

Written by Gary Wonning

There are times we may see something that would define a persons purpose in life and we don’t mention it because we don’t think  they would understand  it or think we may be ridiculed because we see something that seems impossible for mortal humans to see.

My parents purchased a extremely run down farm in 1947 when I was three years old. Life was challenging during those years and mom and dad struggled to revitalize the land and make it profitable.

Struggling with the normal vicissitudes of life, mated with the house burning down, there was little money, but there were a lot of fun and good times.

Thru it all , we survived and the farm once again became prosperous. Tiring of the hard work, we moved off the farm and sought an easier life in town.

Years later, while living in Sedona, my dad came to visit and during his time there, we visited many of the historic sites in the area. 

photo of tuzigoot

Tuzigoot, Native American Indian village near Cottonwood AZ.

One of those sites was Tuzigoot and old Indian ruin near Cottonwood, Arizona. While standing at the top of this ancient village, I saw a vision of my family and many of my dad and mom’s friends working as American Indians in the valley which runs alongside of the Verde River. 

I understood the Indians normally farmed out the land until it became infertile and hunted and fished until all the wild game were gone, they would then move onto more fertile hunting and fishing grounds, leaving the land improvished. 

Mom and dad repaid a lot of karma when they bought that improvised farm and nurtured it back to become a very prosperous farmstead. 

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

A journey into the unknown. Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

Many times the challenges we face in this life are a result of our actions in a previous existence. We all encounter this until we learn to rise above the karma of the past and learn to live a more positive life and realize everyone creates their own reality, and we have no need to feel guilty for the actions of the past, as long as we understand why those deeds were performed and we  truly forgive ourselves and others for past debauchery.

I never told dad what I had seen, later I realized the error of my ways and have pledged to always inform someone of anything of this nature that has been revealed to me, it is part of their spiritual evolvement and they need to know, even though they may think I’m crazy at the time. Photography Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, while studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America and the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has observed that many of the forgotten cultures had spiritual beliefs that were stronger than ours in modern times.

While we have advanced technically far superior to those that came before us, we have lagged behind in spiritual knowledge.

For us to advance as the human race, we need to combine the spiritual knowledge of those that came before us, not only that of the ancients but the knowledge of our direct ancestors as well, with the technical knowledge we have today for us to propel into the twenty-first century and beyond.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

 

 

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The Crystal Skull

 

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The Anna Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull

Written By: Gary Wonning

The crystal skull was discovered at Lubaantun in 1924 by Anna Mitchell-Hedges at the ripe young age of 16. Her father was exploring British Honduras (now Belize) looking for evidence of the legendary Atlantis, when he heard rumors of a pyramid containing relics from an ancient civilization . Her account of the discovery states that she was the only one small enough to climb into the small entrance of the pyramid where the skull was found.

Thirteen of the crystal skulls have allegedly been found in parts of Central America, Mexico, and South America. The skulls are believed to be between 5,000 and 36,000 years old and many people claim they hold healing and magical properties, however, no one really knows where they came from or how they were made.

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The other skulls have been found near ancient Mayan and Aztec ruins, with some evidence linking them to ancient civilizations of Peru. The Mitchell-Hedges skull is the most famous as it resembles a human skull and remarkably, has a removable jaw bone.

Learn more of the ancient Mayan culture

photo of a Mayan Pyramid

An interesting photo book about the Maya Indians of central America

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Demise of The American Indian

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written By: Gary Wonning

Suddenly, we are once again facing the issue of how the American Indians were treated in the early part of our American history.

Needless to say, things could have gone a little better than they did when the white man first discovered and settled this great land.

I know many came here before Columbus, so he wasn’t the first, but no one else came back to settle and as a result, Columbus got all the press. That is the way it is, so be it, you can’t change it, deal with it. 

In reality, the American Indians all came from somewhere else also, so they too are immigrants.

You can slice it any way you want, or spin it to suit your needs, the basic reason Europeans came to the new world, aside from the fact it is human nature to seek out new lands and explore to find out what is on the other side of what we know, was to find new sources of wealth. the Turks were invading Europe and winning. The Europeans  needed money to fight them. In one sense it was a matter of survival.

Yes, we gave the Indians small pox, but they gave us syphilis and tobacco, probably an even trade.

Things were a lot different then, most people treated others rather harshly, the whites were cruel to whites and the Indians were cruel to other Indians. Violence in America didn’t arrive with Columbus. Most American Indians didn’t belong to Greenpeace, the Audubon Society, or Peta.

They farmed out the land, killed off all the game and moved on, most were nomadic. That doesn’t make them bad people, it was just what they knew and thus that is how they lived. There is nothing wrong with killing an animal and eating it, that is part of their mission in life. The animals are evolving just like the rest of us.

The Indians lived a pretty meager life, they didn’t even have horses until the Spanish showed up.

They were doing the best they knew how, and so were the early explorers. It was a clash of cultures, and there isn’t any reason for anyone to suffer white guilt. In most instances, I believe both parties had noble intentions. They just didn’t have the knowledge available to do better, I  think that in many instances things aren’t much better today.

You can’t have two cultures, one who wants to roam and go where they want and a culture that wants private ownership of land trying to occupy the same country.

Which culture actually advanced civilization and overall made things better?

Just like in many other areas, the natives lived here for thousands of years and never advanced their culture on iota.

I don’t believe God placed us on earth to not advance, we are here to grow, learn and improve our lot in life.

If we don’t grow, improve our society and remain strong, we will suffer the same fate as the American Indian.

photo of Cathedral Rock in Sedona Arizona

Cathedral Rock in Sedona Arizona

Having said that, there are many ways we owe the American Indian much, there were times they helped us greatly. The Iroquois form of government was a model for our own government.

In George Washington’s daily prayers, the Iriqous “Spirit Woman” came to him and showed him how the United States would develop and where the major cities would be, thus providing encouragement in his struggles.

Without a doubt, if things would have transpired differently, we could have learned a lot from each other, and it isn’t too late.

Neither of us learned the lesson the first time, but there is no time like the present. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could combine our modern technology with their knowledge of the spiritual world?

Most of us don’t want to spend our lives riding a horse and chasing buffalo, or shivering on a cold winter evening in a TeePee, so our culture has improved over the centuries from what it once was.

The United States was destined to become the great nation that it is. Could it have been done differently, or better? Sure, but it wasn’t.

It’s time for us, and the American Indian to stop being a victim, learn from the past and move on.

The Aborigines of Australia and many other native cultures suffered the same fate. In spite of governments trying to help by giving handouts, that hasn’t helped, it has only made them dependent on government.

The Australian government built homes for them, but because they had lived in the bush for thousands of years, many slept behind the homes on the ground. 

There are tremendous opportunities in the United States for all races, creeds, colors,etc. Anyone can succeed if they have the ability and the desire.

Many white people move from the homeland of their ancestors for a better life, The American Indian has the same opportunity.

We all do, if the place you are living doesn’t provide the opportunity and lifestyle you desire, someplace else will. America has everything, all wrapped up in one country. If you can’t find your place or your destiny, it’s your problem, not society’s.

Common Sense for the modern era

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Improve your health through essential oils and Isagenix.

Welcome to Guatemala

Written by :Gary Wonning

As we neared the border to Guatemala I couldn’t help but notice that it resembled something out of a James Bond movie, khaki uniformed solders with semi-automatic weapons standing guard over a lonely deserted guard shack out in the middle of nowhere.

photo of a little Mayan girl

A little girl carrying water back to the village

After the border guards checked our passports, we were detained for quite a while, no reason, they did not check anything, it just seemed that when they became tired of looking at us, they let us into the country.

Entered  Guatemala from Belize it was as if we were coming in the back door. We drove past an army base, complete with barbed wire fence and angry looking guards, It didn’t take long to realize this wasn’t the time or place for horse play or to make any move that might arouse suspicion.

I began wondering if I had done something REALLY stupid.

YOUR FAVORITE ON-LINE CENTRAL AMERICAN STORE

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of a Mayan Pyramid

An interesting photo book about the Maya Indians of central America

The Iroquois Tribes

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The Iroquois people have inhabited the areas of Ontario and upstate New York for well over 4,000 years.

Technically speaking, “Iroquois” refers to a language rather than a particular tribe. In fact, the IROQUOIS consisted of five tribes prior to European colonization. Their society serves as an outstanding example of political and military organization, complex lifestyle, and an elevated role of women.

Until the 1500s, the five tribes of the Iroquois devoted much energy toward fighting and killing each other. According to ORAL TRADITION, it was about this time that they came to their senses and united into a powerful confederation.

The five tribes designed quite an elaborate political system. This included a bicameral (two-house) legislature, much like the British Parliament and modern U.S. Congress. The representatives, or Sachems, from the Seneca and Mohawk tribes, met in one house and those of the Oneida and Cayuga met in the other. The Onondaga sachems broke ties and had the power to veto decisions made by the others. There was an unwritten constitution that described these proceedings at least as early as 1590. Such a complex political arrangement was unknown in Europe at that time.

YOUR FAVORITE ONLINE PATRIOTIC STORE

It is said our founding fathers met with the Iroquois often and the American Indians taught them much about their way of life and their form of government. We owe them an extreme amount of gratitude for sharing their knowledge. They seemed to know the path America was going to take and knew it was for the good of all.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Improve your health through essential oils

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages

Because we are individuals, we each live a different reality, based on our life experiences, education, and perspective. Strange as it may seem, two people sitting next to each other will perceive the exact same event entirely differently. Because of this, it should make sense that we each have an inner world knowledge and perspective specific to only us. Because of this no one can have more authority over what is right for you than you.
We often have the perception that the most important answers to life’s questions come from outside ourselves. This is an erroneous assumption, because of our personal perspective, experience, and desires, only we know the best possible path to pursue.

10 Quotes From a Sioux Indian Chief That Will Make You Question Everything About Our Society

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I found this really great article, I never saw an author’s name so here it is. My thanks to the author, wherever he may be. I tried to bring about some of these same issues in my book, Wisdom of our Ancestors.

10 Quotes From a Sioux Indian Chief That Will Make You Question Everything About Our Society

1) Praise, flattery, exaggerated manners and fine, high-sounding words were no part of Lakota politeness. Excessive manners were put down as insincere, and the constant talker was considered rude and thoughtless. Conversation was never begun at once, or in a hurried manner.

2) Children were taught that true politeness was to be defined in actions rather than in words. They were never allowed to pass between the fire and the older person or a visitor, to speak while others were speaking, or to make fun of a crippled or disfigured person. If a child thoughtlessly tried to do so, a parent, in a quiet voice, immediately set him right. 

3) Silence was meaningful with the Lakota, and his granting a space of silence before talking was done in the practice of true politeness and regardful of the rule that ‘thought comes before speech.’…and in the midst of sorrow, sickness, death or misfortune of any kind, and in the presence of the notable and great, silence was the mark of respect… strict observance of this tenet of good behavior was the reason, no doubt, for his being given the false characterization by the white man of being a stoic. He has been judged to be dumb, stupid, indifferent, and unfeeling.

4) We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, the winding streams with tangled growth, as ‘wild’. Only to the white man was nature a ‘wilderness’ and only to him was it ‘infested’ with ‘wild’ animals and ‘savage’ people. To us it was tame. Earth was bountiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery.

5) With all creatures of the earth, sky and water was a real and active principle. In the animal and bird world there existed a brotherly feeling that kept the Lakota safe among them. And so close did some of the Lakotas come to their feathered and furred friends that in true brotherhood they spoke a common tongue.

6) This concept of life and its relations was humanizing and gave to the Lakota an abiding love. It filled his being with the joy and mystery of living; it gave him reverence for all life; it made a place for all things in the scheme of existence with equal importance to all.

7) It was good for the skin to touch the earth, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with bare feet on the sacred earth… the old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces. For him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him. 

8) Everything was possessed of personality, only differing from us in form. Knowledge was inherent in all things. The world was a library and its books were the stones, leaves, grass, brooks, and the birds and animals that shared, alike with us, the storms and blessings of earth. We learned to do what only the student of nature learns, and that was to feel beauty. We never railed at the storms, the furious winds, and the biting frosts and snows. To do so intensified human futility, so whatever came we adjusted ourselves, by more effort and energy if necessary, but without complaint.

9) …the old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to a lack of respect for humans, too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.

10) Civilization has been thrust upon me… and it has not added one whit to my love for truth, honesty, and generosity.

 Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures. Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hardcover and Ebooks, and contact information: please check his website, www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments appreciated

young living

George Koritzer

There is an extreme shortage of common sense in today’s world, When looking back in history, I soon discovered this has always been a problem, Benjamin Franklin once said, ”Of all the senses, common sense seems to be the one that is used the least.” As obvious as it may seem, many seem to be totally oblivious to it. Most, if not all of the problems the world faces today could be solved if people would just sit back and think about what would seem to be the most obvious and simple solution to any issue. Often times people tend to overcomplicate the issues. I often think back to what my parents and grandparents believed and said, at the time I thought they were totally out of their mind and ignored it. I now wish I would have listened and followed their advice. It is now evident they were a lot smarter than we gave them credit for. Many times, in today’s world, the schools and universities can no longer be counted on to teach truth and values that will guide someone through life.

Available in both hard copy and ebook format.

 

Arizona’s Variety Landscape

Photography Prints

 

The Grand Canyon State, Arizona, the home of many western movies in the early fifties and sixties, features beautiful landscapes, vista, and scenery not seen anywhere else.

Running over to the brim with beautiful scenery, Arizona offers untold possibilities for the amateur of professional photographer to capture a multitude of classic and beautiful photographs.

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The Boynton Canyon Vortex in Sedona Arizona draws spiritual seekers from around the world.

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Saguaro National Park near Tuscon has a stark beauty all it’s own.

 

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Toozigoot, an ancient Anasazi settlement near Cottonwood Arizona. Located on the banks of the Verde River,  it was home to the American Indian for generations.

 

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Secret Canyon, now home to Enchantment Resort near Sedona, draws the famous and unfamous alike.

 Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures. Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hardcover and Ebooks, and contact information: please check his website, http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments appreciated

money photography

This informative Ebook describes alternative methods of making money often a full-time income in photography even if you have no desire to shoot wedding photography. this book gives examples and websites where you can use your photos to supply you with an income, not only to enable you to buy new equipment, but a living income.

 

Camping World