Major Wolf and Masonry in the Civil War

 

During the Civil War, Confederate Major Enoch Obid Wolf (1829-1910) served with Ford’s Battalion Arkansas Cavalry, Company C. In 1863 he was captured by the Union forces.

He was taken prisoners and along with six other was to be shot in retaliation for the shooting of a Union officer.

Major Wolf, a Freemason, cut a piece from his cane and fashioned a masonic ring from it.

His masonic brothers went to work with a zeal that is only known to a worthy brother in distress and wired to Washington and as a consequence President Lincoln issued a reprieve that arrived just as the firing squad were loading their weapons.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Masonic Brotherhood in the Civil War

 

A second reason why Masonry held together is that membership in a Masonic Lodge is by choice only. No man has ever been recruited into joining a Lodge. Our rules, in fact, prohibit Masons from actively pursuing someone for initiation. Instead, a man interested in becoming a Mason must, “of his own free will and accord,” actively seek out a member of the Lodge which he wishes to join and ask him for a petition for membership.

The third reason is the structure of the Craft itself. There are a number of internal rules and customs that helped the Lodge as a whole avoid the turbulent politics and divisiveness of the War. This allowed the Lodge to continue to function as a place a man could go when he needed help or a quiet haven from the storms that raged outside the Craft. It was then and continues to be today, a place where true brotherhood exists.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Starting High School in the Fifties

 

Entering high school in 1958, we couldn’t wait for the first day of school. There was a Catholic school about ten miles from Napoleon and since they didn’t have a high school in the tiny town of Millhousen, their kids always transferred to our school.

We only had about thirty-five kids in our class and not many people ever moved in or out of our community, so it was always nice to meet new kids when they came to our school.

We had heard through the grapevine that there were about ten kids in their class of freshman, and the town was noted for having cute girls, so obviously, we couldn’t wait to see who they were. We waited for the bus from Millhousen to pull up in front of the school.

We weren’t disappointed, the girls were really cute.

We already many cute girls in our class, but it doesn’t hurt to add to the herd.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonry During the Civil War

 

 

An excerpt from my new book.

The Civil War was the single most divisive event in our nation’s long history. No other war, political event, or national crisis has ever approached the levels of animosity and hatred that the Civil War caused. Brother fought against brother. Fathers against sons. Families were forever split over the idealism of the War. They were not alone. Major national organizations, notably the Baptist Churches, also broke up over the issues of slavery and States’ Rights. The War seemed to destroy the bonds of any organization it touched.

All the organizations, that is, except one: Freemasonry. While the War raged around them, Freemasons held on to the ties and the idealism that brought them together in the first place. Thousands of Masons fought in the War, and many died. But the tenets of the Craft, those ideals and moral codes that we, as Freemasons, strive to abide by, were able to overcome the hatred and the animosity that the War generated.

There are a number of reasons why this organization, more than any other, was able to survive the tumult that was the Civil War. A major reason is the long and storied history of the Craft. The beliefs and tenets of the Lodge predate not only the Civil War, but the Constitution, the discovery of the New World, and, according to some, even the birth of Christ. When a tradition of that many years exists, it is difficult to ignore.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonic Civil War Stories

 

An excerpt from my latest book:

“My father had been a soldier in the Union Army. . .He was made a Mason in a military Lodge. . .Taken prisoner at Arkansas Post, he was carried up the Mississippi River to Rock Island, Illinois. . .My father became. . . desperately ill, and made himself known as a Mason to an officer of the camp. The officer took him to his own home and nursed him back to life. When the war ended, he loaned Father money to pay his way back to his Texas home, and gave him a pearl-handled pistol to protect himself. . .This experience of my father, when I learned about it, had a very great influence upon my life. . .; the fact that such a fraternity of men could exist, mitigating the harshness of war, and remain unbroken when states and churches were torn in two, became a wonder; and it is not strange that I tried for years to repay my debt to it.”

    — Joseph Fort Newton, D.D. in River of Years

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Storm Clouds Brewing Over Siesta Key in Sarasota Florida

This beautiful photo was taken on Siesta Key Beach in Sarasota Florida, voted several times as the best beach in the United States.

it would really look good hanging in your office or home.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way, he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulie@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Visiting Friends And Family

In those days, we would visit friends and relatives on the weekends. Saturday night always saw either us getting together with friends, at their house or ours. The parents would have a couple of beers and play cards all night while us kids played in another room or outside if the weather permitted.

If we couldn’t find anything else to do, we would go shopping on Saturday night.

A big night would mean we drove all the way to Batesville, shopped and stopped at grandma and grandpa Wonnings on the way home. It would often be nine o’clock before we got there so the evening could run late.

Before anyone would realize it, grandma would be stirring in the kitchen, frying a chicken and all the fixins, it would many times be midnight before we ate.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome