Should We Play a Religious song At A Football Game?

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

Someone mentioned that during a college football game in Florida, on Veteran’s Day, the band played Amazing Grace and played “Taps”.

They thought it was inappropriate.

I remember, not too many years ago, something like that would have been not only appropriate but expected.

This just goes to show how far our once great country has declined., all in the name of political correctness.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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I May Not Agree With What You Say

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

I may not agree with what you day, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

How often have we heard or read this famous quote?

This quote is often attributed to Voltaire, however, the actual quote was made by Evelyn Beatrice Hall who wrote her biography of Voltaire, “The Life of Voltaire.”

I can’t help but think the first amendment to the constitution in our Bill of Rights was patterned after this thought.

In essence, the first amendment states, that we all have a right to say whatever we want. It is guaranteed. Whether we should say whatever we want is an entirely different subject and should be left to a matter of discretion.

But, doesn’t this also fit into the discussion as to whether our rights come from God or government?

Would a power hungry leader of a country ever submit to this, that we have a right to say whatever we want regardless if we agree with him or not?

I would venture to say that 99% of the time, they would not.

Only a Supreme Being who grants every soul Free Will would be willing and capable to give the individual such power.

A government bureaucrat would never even consider doing such a thing.

I believe that because our founders believed in a Supreme Being and his authority over us, and they wanted to limit the power of government because of the knowledge they had of abuse of government on the European scene, their purpose was to make a world that was based on spirituality and not political rhetoric.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

UPS Arizona style

capiture of a ups driver making a delivery

A UPS driver making a delivery to a beautiful blonde

Written by Gary Wonning

I was about to see another side of UPS. My aunt and uncle lived in Phoenix Arizona so I decided to go visit them in February of nineteen eighty-eight. My uncle had been confined to assisted living, so it was just my aunt and myself gallivanting around the desert.

One afternoon, a few miles northwest of Phoenix, we entered the little town of Wickenburg, at the edge of town was a small gas station. I happened to look over in the parking lot and there were four P-400 UPS package cars parked at a small roller conveyor with a roof built over it.

I had to check this out; I turned around and inquired at the station.  The attendant told me that yes it was a UPS center, there were only four drivers, each would deliver a quarter of the seven hundred population town and head out into the desert, going a different direction, serving mainly Indian reservations. There was a goose neck trailer in the back with a window air conditioner sticking out the side. This was the office, a manager would drive up from Phoenix in the morning, get things started and then drive back to Phoenix for the rest of the day.

After moving to Sedona a few years later, I was to discover this was common in the desert, with a climate that featured no extreme cold, very little rain, and a sparse population, only the essentials were needed.

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In Camp Verde located in the Verde River Valley, they used what looked like a manufactured home with docks in the side as a center. The package cars were parked outside in the weather, of course the loading was done in the early morning hours before the heat of the day had set in.

Arizona also had state wide seniority whereby a driver could bid on an area statewide, I think the areas came up for bid every two years and if he/she had enough seniority could bid on any area in the state.  A lot of times drivers in Phoenix would do this to escape the heat of the low desert and to get away from the stressful city life.

Because of the distance Arizona was from Louisville and the three time zones involved, next day air parcels had to leave Sedona by two-thirty pm in order to arrive in Phoenix in time to make the plane to the main air hub in Louisville.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

The Korean War Memorial in Washington D.C.

Photography by Gary Wonning

The Korean War began on June 25, 1950  when some 75,000 soldiers from the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south. 

Please click on the photos for articles and photos relating to the era.

By July, American troops had entered the war on South Korea’s behalf. As far as American officials were concerned, it was a war against the forces of international communism itself. They felt, an rightfully so that communism could not be allowed to spread across the world, it had to be stopped.

Unlike World War II and Vietnam, the Korean War did not get much media attention in the United States. It became the forgotten war.  The most famous representation of the war in popular culture is the television series “M*A*S*H,” which was set in a field hospital in South Korea. 

Many feared it was the first step in a communist campaign to take over the world. For this reason, nonintervention was not considered an option by many top decision makers. (In fact, in April 1950, a National Security Council report known as NSC-68 had recommended that the United States use military force to “contain” communist expansionism anywhere it seemed to be occurring, “regardless of the intrinsic strategic or economic value of the lands in question.”)

The Korean War was relatively short but exceptionally bloody. Nearly 5 million people died. More than half of these–about 10 percent of Korea’s prewar population–were civilians. (This rate of civilian casualties was higher than World War II’s and Vietnam’s.) Almost 40,000 Americans died in action in Korea, and more than 100,000 were wounded.

A truce was obtained, with neither side winning, the start of an illadivised trend in American warfare that continues today. 

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

It’s Great To Be An American

The Vietnam War Memorial in Washington DC.

Written by Gary Wonning

If there is anything good that will come out of the last eight years of turmoil, I believe it will be the fact that many Americans have become more aware of the value of our constitution and way of life.

Many of us have forgotten how lucky we re to live in this great land of ours. We forget how many around the world still live under oppression and poverty, the likes of which even the poorest in this country can’t imagine.

Often times, we Americans forget how lucky we are to live in this great land of ours and it takes someone from another country to remind us

Many times I have tried to remove myself from the animosities in the world today, but I am always drawn back by something someone from another country says or does about our country.

On Christmas Eve a friend of mine, someone who normally doesn’t express his feelings, made the statement about how much he loves America.

It was the perfect time to be once again reminded of how fortunate all of us are to live in this great land.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Growing Up in the 50s: A Social Life And Milking

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Sometimes it was hard to squeeze a social life into the farm scene. Going to the basketball games was a required course in school, missing a ball game was out of the question, a person could get banned from his community from such an atrocious act.

When the game was played at a school several miles from home, it was a real challenge.

There was only about forty-five minutes from the time I would arrive home from school until the bus would leave from the school to go to the game.

That didn’t leave much time for milking thirty head of cows.

But I got’er done. The stanchions held four cows and we had two milkers. So I would run two cows in, wash them, put the milkers on, feed them, bring two more in, prepare them, take the milkers off the first two and put them on the second two and repeat the process until I finished.

I could milk thirty cows in thirty minutes. At these stressed times, the cows didn’t give much milk, the milkers weren’t on long enough, and they didn’t eat much either. But they made up for it the next morning.

You couldn’t do that twice in a row or the cows would get mastitis, but when there is an emergency such as getting to a ball game, you gotta do what you gotta do.

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Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Fisherman’s Village Punta Gorda Florida

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Fisherman’s Village is a waterfront shopping, entertainment, and resort complex located along Charlotte Harbor in Punta Gorda Florida. It includes over 30 shops and restaurants as well as a resort with 47 timeshare villas on the second floor.

The original pier was built in 1928,and was known as the Maud Street City Dock, which was built to repalce the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad dock at King Street.

 

Today many shops and restaurants line the wharf, Harpoon Harry’s, Hurricane Charleys, and the Fish Market are three of the most popular eating establishments.

Christmas decoration are everywhere, making it quite festive.

The Punta Gorda Fishing Company and the West Coast Fish Company began operating from the Maud Street dock, and later tenants included Gulf Coast Oil Company and Matt Week’s Boat Shop.

The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, who operated the previous dock, connected their track to serve the Maud Street dock via a spur that once served the Long Dock (the Punta Gorda Linear Park adjacent to Fisherman’s Village today runs along the former rail spur).

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.