Australia: Recipe For Damper Bread

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

A favorite of the aborigines.

Recipe for Australian Damper Bread:

This is traditional bread baked in the coals of an open fire or in a Dutch Oven (huge lidded cast iron pot) but nowadays we bake it in a normal oven. Of course there are as many variations as there are days in the years but the basic recipe is as follow:

Ingredients
4 cups self-raising flour
3/4 – 1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
2 tablespoons butter at room temperature
1 cup milk
1/2 cup water
Method Sift the flour and salt into a bowl and mix in the sugar.
Rub in the butter with your (clean) hands until a fine breadcrumb texture is achieved.
For a well in the top of the flour, pour in the milk and water, and mix well with a knife until the dough come clean from the sides of the bowl.
Turn out onto a floured board and knead until smooth and silky, like a baby’s bottom.
Shape into a mounded loaf, (some people cut a deep cross in the top) and bake in a preheated oven, 200 c / 400 F, for 25 minutes.
Then lower the temperature to 180 c / 375 f and cook a further 10 – 15 minutes until done.
The loaf should be a light golden brown colour and sound hollow when tapped.
If you are “game” try cooking it on a camp fire; nothing beats that extra smoky flavour, especially using Australian Eucalyptus wood to give it that special something.
If you are cooking in an oven at home, try putting a few Gum Leaves in the over to smoke as your are cooking the bread.

Life in the out back

Damper Bread is very similar to Irish Soda Bread, and probably developed from recipes brought over by Irish immigrants/convicts. Variations of the basic recipe are seemingly endless, but you could try substituting other liquids, such as beer for a darker colour/flavour, or varying the ratio of milk to water, and so on.

Try adding more sugar and butter and some dried fruits for a dessert damper. Basically use your imagination. If you are cooking on an open fire you could try wrapping the dough in aluminum foil before you place it in the coals, or even try wrapping the dough around a stick and cooking suspended over the flames.
Good Baking!

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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The Rainbow Serpent in Aboriginal Folk Lore

.photo of ayres rock, "uluru" in central Australia

The life of the Australian Aborigine

Written by Gary Wonning

The Rainbow Serpent is the cornerstone to the aboriginal beliefs and customs.

The Rainbow Serpent, the symbol of creation to the Australian aborigines means different things to different people, much like God means different things to various people in the west. 

Many aborigines believe they have seen the Rainbow Serpent, they report it has being seen as a snake, and is  similar to meeting God, or an Angel.

They believe the Rainbow Serpent made all the water and everything in creation.

Some compare it to the Loch Ness Monster, and like seeing UFOs only certain people  have seen it.

Most say the Rainbow Serpent is more feeling than visual. Like a God, if you believe it is there, then it’s  there, like the wind blowing.

We believe God is our creator, they believe Rainbow Serpent is their creator, and the Rainbow Serpent created everything and watches over them, it takes a special skill to see him,  only tribal Elders meet him.

They believe she came  from the  Sun.

The Rainbow Serpent is often referred to as male or female, depending on the individual and circumstances.

It seems most cultures have the same thoughts towards who or what God is , they just use different names and symbols, often times the names and symbols are guided by their environment and their perception of reality.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

A journey into the unknown. Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Art Prints

Aborigine Spiritual Beliefs

Written by Gary Wonning

A few of the aborigine spiritual beliefs, it is a fascinating culture.

Money doesn’t disappear, it just changes place or form when we spend it.

When you spend all your time and money on earth the physical body dies, we have a bank of energy when we are born, when it is gone, we die.

Spiritual energy doesn’t die, a car suddenly stops that just ran out of petrol. When we run  out of petrol, our body dies, but the soul lives on.

A Lifetime is called a dreaming (destiny) aborigines are scientist, we are all spiritual beings.

The aborigines have been traced to Iraq, Iran, and Malaysia.

They are Caucasians, and aborigine refers to religion, not color of skin. If you follow the way of life you are Aborigine, regardless of color.

You can get can get government welfare regardless of skin color.

In time, color breads away, after first mating, regardless of color it graduates away ½, ¼,1/8. 

You can either be Australian or Aborigine, you can change each census, and you can be anything you want, German, French,etc.

Being an aborigine has nothing to do with color or physical features, same as being Christian, they believe there are  only two types of people, aborigines, and the rest.

There is no scientific evidence they have been here more than 12,000 years, but they believe they have been here at least 40,000 years.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

A journey into the unknown. Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

A Spiritual Encounter In The Outback Of Australia

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

Written by Gary Wonning

Ubirr Rock is a sacred monolith in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory of Australia.

Ubirr Rock has several natural shelters that contain a collection of rock art, some thought to be tens of thousands of years old. The art depicts creation ancestors and animals from the area including barramundi, catfish, goannas, long neck turtles,wallabies and kangaroos.

Some of the paintings can date back as far as forty thousand years, with most having been done about two thousand years ago and many have been repainted several times.

The main gallery contains many examples of x-ray art and is probably the most photographed. Also is seen paintings of white men and Mimi spirits ( extraterrestrials) , so thin they can slip in and out of the cracks in the rocks.

A painting of a Thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, can be seen at the northern end of the gallery. This tiger  has been extinct in the area for about 2000 years, and attests to the antiquity of the paintings.

Rainbow Serpent Gallery

This is a woman only site, and is  the most sacred site at Ubirr, although this rule is often relaxed for non-indigenous tourists. This is the spot visited by the Rainbow Serpent or “Garranga’rreli”, during her path across the top end of Australia, during the Dreaming. As she crossed the land, she “sang” the rocks, plants, animals, and people into existence. This path, or songline is still a sacred path to the indigenous people who live in northern Australia.

From the top of Ubirr rock there is a panoramic view of the flood plains and escarpments.

It is from this idyllic view I experienced my most profound spiritual encounter.

Exiting from the bus that brought me here, I left the main trail and began walking around the back of the rock and started climbing the 100 ft. vertical wall, all the time carrying 40 lbs. of camera gear on my back.

As I began my ascent my reality began to change, I was no longer an American photographer visiting Australia, I was transformed into a native carefully climbing a vertical wall, placing each hand and foot in a strategic place, never pausing, but slowly climbing upward as I had done many times before. Always finding a tree, root or rock ledge enabling me to continue my climb, never pausing but slowly climbing upward in my search for truth.

Photography Prints

Reaching the top of this sacred Shrine in the middle of some of the most isolated land in the world I began to feel overwhelming love and peace and a sense of being home, I had returned to the Land of Oz.

As I lay on this sacred monument my mind began to pass through the veil of time, into a place from whence all things are seen, back in time, back to a previous millennium, back to the birth of Australia

I felt my consciousness leave my body and rise high above the earth. Looking down I could sense two realities, I had a sense of being high above the earth and looking down upon my lifeless body lying on the rocky cliff, I could observe a bird walking on my right arm, at the same time I was the lifeless body on the cliff, feeling and sensing that same bird walking across my arm.

As the land rose from the sea, the mountains began to form high above the plains; the Rainbow Serpent began to transform the land into a new world called Australius.

I suddenly re-entered my body and came back to the present reality, slightly dazed about what had just taken place. Gazing into my camera close by, I knew that someday when the time was right, I would write about this event.

Upon my return to the bus, Mark, our Aborigine driver informed me that I had been on sacred ground, where no one is allowed without permission. There is a $5,000 fine for that. He then looked at me, winked and said” But you had permission!”

Needless to say, the trip back to Jabiru was quite an experience, I felt like I was coming down from a tremendous high, someone remarked and wondered what I drugs I had taken. I have never taken drugs in my life, but there is nothing that could equal this feeling. The rest of the day I was rather worthless as I tried to absorb what had just transpired! I had been told several months earlier that July 7th would be a special day, being in the outback, I hadn’t even realized that today was July 7th, until now! How interesting, July 7th is the day of the Roswell crash, 42 years to the day!

What a perfect ending to our last night of camping, day broke with a Wallaby sauntering about our camp site.

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Aboriginal Dream Time

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

The Dream time is very detailed and includes every aspect of the aboriginal life.

The aborigine who has been taught the Dream Time is very intuitive and extremely aware of his surroundings, Crocodile Dundee was all Hollywood, but not very far off on this perspective.

The Dream time has different meanings, sometimes you are just using memory, or if  into the  future it is imagination. Dream time is just anytime past or any experience.

All spiritual beings, instead of settling earth they say they dreamed it, when you go on trip, you dream it up first.

All travel costs in energy, time, and money.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Aborigines: The First People

 

 

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

Aborigines are the first people to live in a land. When you are born, the first animal your mother sees becomes your totem.Same totems can’t marry, Inbreeds become stupid.

After death, they were buried in graves, cremated, embalmed, or they wrapped up the bones and put them in a tree. Some tribes cut off their heads and buried it elsewhere.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

 

Aboriginal Culture: Raising the Young

 

In the past only healthy babies were kept, they were suckled for seven years and if the mother couldn’t keep up with work and the child, the baby was killed. Most tribes contained 20- 30 people, with 4-5 in each family. Some lived to be 100 years old and some had more than one wife. If a husband passed away, many times the wife and family would be supported by another male.

It took about six acres of land to support one person, they survived by eating whatever was available, including termites, ants, and grub worms.

We even had the chance to eat a grub worm, it was prepared in the usual fashion, roasted in an open pit fire, it wasn’t too bad, tasted like chicken.

If the tribe became too large and there wasn’t enough food, the weaker ones were either killed or left to die.

In the dry years, women would not ovulate. They would have zero population growth. Sometimes the droughts would last 10 years, and there would be no children born during that time. The lack of food and environmental stress ruined the sex drive.

When a woman first felt the kick of her child, the first animal they saw was believed to be its totem or spirit animal, that is the closest source of energy. It could be a snake, kangaroo or anything.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome