You Know You live In Phoenix When

The birds have to use potholders to pull worms out of the ground.

The trees are whistling for the dogs.

The best parking place is determined by shade instead of distance.

Hot water now comes out of both taps.

You can make sun tea instantly.

You learn that a seat belt buckle makes a pretty good branding iron.

The temperature drops below 95 and you feel a little chilly.

You discover that in July it only takes 2 fingers to steer your car.

You discover that you can get sunburned through your car window.

You actually burn your hand opening the car door.

You break into a sweat the instant you step outside at 7:30 a.m.

Your biggest bicycle wreck fear is, “What if I get knocked out and
end up lying on the pavement and cook to death?”

You realize that asphalt has a liquid state.

The potatoes cook underground, so all you have to do is pull one
out and add butter, salt and pepper.

Farmers are feeding their chickens crushed ice to keep them from
laying boiled eggs.

The cows are giving evaporated milk.

Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature,landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt,the Canary Islands,much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website.www.commonsensejourneys.com

You can also follow him on your Kindle.

Your comments appreciated

schoolhouse

 

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Snow in Michigan

Snow in Northern Michigan

I just got off the phone with a friend who lives in northern
Michigan. He said that the snow is nearly waist high and is still
falling.


The temperature is at fifteen degrees and still dropping… and the wind is increasing to near gale force.


Even the plows are having a hard time getting around.


The schools are closed, and alerts are on all the TV and radio stations urging people to stay off the streets.


He said his wife has done nothing but look through the kitchen window for hours on end, just staring.


He says he’s concerned that if it gets much worse, he may have to let her in.


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Long Range Weather Prediction

Long-Range Weather Prediction

Summer was coming to a close. The Indians on the remote
reservation asked their new Chief if the winter was going to be severe
or mild.

Since he was an Indian Chief in a modern society, he had never been
taught old secrets; when he looked at the sky, he couldn’t tell how the
weather was going to be.

Nevertheless, to be safe, he told his tribe that the winter was
indeed going to be bad and that everybody should collect wood and be
prepared.

Being a practical leader, he had an idea after a few days. He went to

the phone booth, called the National Weather Service and asked “Is the
coming winter going to be bad?” “It looks like this winter is going to
be terrible,” the meteorologist at the weather service responded.

So the Chief went back to his people and told them to collect even

more wood in order to be prepared. A week later, he called the National
Weather Service again. “Is it going to be a cold winter?” “Yes,” the man
at National Weather Service again replied, “It definitely will be very
severe.”

The Chief again went back to his people and ordered them to collect

every scrap of wood they could find. Two weeks later, he called the
National Weather Service again. “Are you absolutely sure that the winter
is going to be very cold?”

“Absolutely,” the man replied. “It’s going to be one of the coldest winters ever.”

“How can you be so sure?” the Chief asked. The weatherman replied, “Because the Indians are collecting wood like crazy!”

The Paranormal Dictionary

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 Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature,landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt,the Canary Islands,much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website.www.commonsensejourneys.com

Your comments appreciated

schoolhouse

A life long journey of spiritual enlightenment. A journey we all must take.

 

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Tornado April 3rd, 1974

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Tornadoes

Probably one of the most devastating weather days in America was April 3rd,1974 when 147 tornadoes struck in 12 states.

In southeastern Indiana, it was turning into a stereotypical stormy spring  day. The weather was extremely unsettled, one minute the sun was shining, the next raining and the next a hail storm would be descending upon us.

Driving was extremely hazardous, the wind was blowing constantly while changing direction and speed every minute. From past experience and knowing the time of year, it had to be realized, something extremely bad was going to happen. About noon the storm warnings started being posted, everything from severe storms, hail and tornado watches were seen everywhere in the midwest. This was not going to be a good day.

It was about 4 PM when I heard a warning had been sounded for the area I was traveling, Switzerland County which borders the Ohio River near Madison. A large tornado had been spotted in Jefferson County, southwest of us. The tornado was reported to be in Madison and was creating widespread destruction as it traveled in the traditional northeasterly direction.

Looking to the southwest, I saw the granddaddy of them all. The whole sky seemed to be one gigantic funnel cloud. This is not good! Later I found out when the tornado crossed the Ohio River near Madison, the river bottom,  30 feet below the water level could be seen.

Driving on, looking for cover, I came to a house where two people were standing in the yard watching the funnel cloud, I drove in and asked if they had a basement.

Their answer,”No”.

Damn, the only house in Indiana without a basement, and here I am. There was no basketball hoop either, these people aren’t real Hoosiers!

Looking upwards to the sky, It seemed the tornado was dissipating, in a hurry I decided to go on my way, wouldn’t be safe here anyway, no  basement. Might as well take my chances lying in  a ditch.

My mind was soon  changed, as I driving onto the road, as I  looked up, the tornado had again started to descend, it was so close I couldn’t see the edge of it above me.

The tornado  began to touch down, an eerie silence was felt,  only the distant  roar of the tornado force winds could be heard. Where we stood, not a leaf turned, the wind died down completely. It was like watching a movie, with as many as three funnel clouds touching down simultaneously, trees were snapping off like toothpicks, a farm implement dealer was struck, tractors, combines, and other farm implements were flying through the air with the greatest of ease. A mobile home park was in the path, mobile homes would ascend about 100 feet into the air and explode.

I was envisioning a death toll of hundreds, possibly more as the tornado had struck several larger towns and small cities.My day was over, I followed a fire truck through the destruction, they were cutting trees from the road as they traveled. People were standing alongside the roadway, most wore ashen white faces and were in total shock. It was then I found another tornado had struck close to my home and I began to worry about my family and their safety.

All in all things turned out reasonably well ,we were in pretty good shape for the mess we were in, the property destruction was major and many amazing stories of survival would surface over the next few weeks, however  as bad as even one death is, very few casualties were encountered.

Interesting? Follow me on Kindle.

 The author has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures. Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hardcover and Ebooks, and contact information: please check his website, http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments appreciated

baby boomers

Each generation from the beginning of our country has contributed to what our country has become. By the same token, no one is perfect. Consequently, each generation has done and will continue to perform acts that it would have been better if some other course of action was taken.
The baby boomers have contributed much and have been blamed for the decline of America. What is the true story?

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Weather:The Blizzard of 1978

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The Blizzard

 

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Living in Southeastern Indiana, most our winters were relatively mild. A normal winter would consist of maybe two feet of snow spread over the entire season and a couple of weeks of zero weather. The rest of the winter would be cloudy and dreary, with highs just above freezing.

Starting in 1976, we experienced three increasingly several winters, with the grand daddy of them all in 1978. The winter started out innocently enough with a fairly mild pre-Christmas period. I remember thinking that this winter would probably see little or no snow, since the previous two had been so severe. Boy was I in for a rude awakening!

Everything went well until the third week in January, which is notorious for  blizzards and bad weather. The week-end saw blizzard warnings being posted on TV and radio, however as is often the case nothing develops and not much attention is given to them. Things changed on Sunday as the first wave of snow descended upon us. Over two feet fell in a short period of time and coupled with high winds, our world was paralyzed.

I had been working for UPS for 9 years and this was the first day that nothing moved. Most of the roads had been cleared so  things were better Tuesday,  life was kind of back to normal.

Then the warnings kept coming, a major blizzard was on it’s way . The weather service was predicting several feet of snow . Most thought we couldn’t have two blizzards in a week, however as the sun sat on Wednesday it became apparent that something major was in the making.

The wind had turned to the northwest and the temperature dropped. Soon the snow was falling faster the stock market in ’29. Looking out my front window and seeing nothing but snow, it was evident we were in for the “big” one.

UPS and it’s drivers had the attitude that we could handle anything and weather couldn’t stop us. We had never had a day before this week where deliveries couldn’t be made. As a result, they were sending “feeders “to Indianapolis from Cincinnati, after the freeway had been closed. About 200 units became stranded in the snow, with some isolated for up to 2 months. Needless to say that policy was soon changed, after that, when a severe blizzard was forecast, everyone was pulled off the roads at sundown.

Nothing moved until the following Monday, needless to say the highway department didn’t have the equipment to handle all the snow. Many areas were isolated, in some locations snow was piled up as high as 20 feet .The roads would be opened and no sooner than the snow plows went through, the wind would blow them shut again. Soon every farmer with a tractor and construction worker that owned a bulldozer had been hired by the state to help clean the roads.

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The local Dairy Queen housed about  200 stranded truckers and motorists. After they ran out of food, more food was air lifted in by helicopter. Most were stranded for over  a week, that’s a long time to eat brazers and hot fudge sundaes.

All in all , over 60 inches of snow fell that winter.

It didn’t let up or thaw out until the last week in March, making it over two months that many people were isolated, many without heat or electricity.

My grandpa had always talked about how bad the winter of ’06 had been.I noticed he had quit talking about ’06, so I asked him why.
He just responded, ” ’78 was worse.”

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