Aboriginal Culture: Raising the Young

 

In the past only healthy babies were kept, they were suckled for seven years and if the mother couldn’t keep up with work and the child, the baby was killed. Most tribes contained 20- 30 people, with 4-5 in each family. Some lived to be 100 years old and some had more than one wife. If a husband passed away, many times the wife and family would be supported by another male.

It took about six acres of land to support one person, they survived by eating whatever was available, including termites, ants, and grub worms.

We even had the chance to eat a grub worm, it was prepared in the usual fashion, roasted in an open pit fire, it wasn’t too bad, tasted like chicken.

If the tribe became too large and there wasn’t enough food, the weaker ones were either killed or left to die.

In the dry years, women would not ovulate. They would have zero population growth. Sometimes the droughts would last 10 years, and there would be no children born during that time. The lack of food and environmental stress ruined the sex drive.

When a woman first felt the kick of her child, the first animal they saw was believed to be its totem or spirit animal, that is the closest source of energy. It could be a snake, kangaroo or anything.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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In Trouble In Church: Life In the Fifties

 

 

After or during these socials, as well as in church we boys could always find trouble, seems as if it was lurking around every corner. As I grew older, mom became less willing to let me sit with other boys, not sure why.

One particular Sunday, Kenny and I were sitting in the back of the church behind a bachelor that was inclined to fall asleep. He had a habit of resting his head on his hand with his elbow firmly planted on the church pew. Sure enough, his head began to nod about halfway through the sermon.

One can only resist the urge so long, suddenly and without warning, I found my right index finger firmly lodged beside his elbow, one sudden jerk and it would be mission accomplished.

The unintended consequences were that his head hit the church pew and resulted in a sound that was heard throughout the church. 

I knew I was in trouble when mom turned around and glared at me. 

The next few Sundays, I sat quietly next to mom.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Nature Is Sacred

The aborigines of Australia believe:

All nature is sacred, but in creation place, spirit power manifests more readily, these are places where great events of creation took place. Members of a group share a common totem, and each individual has a totem.

There is no better learning than life learning, knowledge is not important it’s how you feel about it.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

A Spiritual Encounter In the Out Back:This is What I Came For

Written By: Gary Wonning

July 7th, This was to be our last day in the outback of Australia, I was beginning to feel as though I didn’t want to go back to the states, this felt like home to me.

Our final stop of the day before traveling to the Alligator River campground to camp for the night was to be at Jabiru, a new uranium mining town in Kakadu National Park.

The Australian government is trying to correct some of the mistakes that we Americans created in dealing with our American Indians.

 

The Australian government has decided that when any minerals are found on Aboriginal Land, the wealth is shared with the native peoples. The city of Jabiru is one such instance of this policy being put into effect.

It is a very modern city with beautiful parks and lakes.

After having lunch at one of the many outdoor restaurants, we were looking forward to an afternoon off, spending it swimming in a large lake nearby. It would have been a welcome relief after spending six grueling days traveling the outback of Australia.

It was about this time that Mark, our driver suggested that if we wanted to see one more sacred Aboriginal Site, he would be willing to drive us.

Many things began racing through my mind, we had visited many ancient sites in the last month and I really didn’t want to see any more, you see one, you’ve seen them all.

The swimming sounded really refreshing, but what the heck, I could go swimming at home next week if I wanted, this was my last day in The Land of Oz, I wanted to enjoy it to the max. I knew deep down that this was going to be a very special afternoon. Being in the outback for almost a month, I was unaware of the date, July 7th, 1989, I was about to discover would be a highlight in my search for truth, and the reason I came to Australia. (Hilda had reminded me of this months ago, but it had slipped my mind.)

Besides that, everyone knows that all the rivers in Australia are filled with crocodiles and after swimming in those uranium infested waters I would probably glow like a porch light all night.

With that in mind, nine of us boarded the bus for the bumpy, dusty forty miles of dirt road that lay ahead. Sitting near the back of the bus I had plenty of time to contemplate what lay ahead and what it would all mean to me. As we bounced along the dusty road occasionally crossing crocodile infested creeks and rivers it seemed as though I was going back in time, to a time long forgotten, a time remembered only in the Aboriginal Dreamtime. I was a little awed at what was going on around me, I could sense and see the other people on the bus, but it was as though I wasn’t really a part of their reality and they perhaps weren’t part of mine.

The dust from the road filtered into the bus and a red layer settled on everyone and everything. At times when passing another vehicle, yes there were others out here, it became so dusty in the bus that we could barely see the driver. At these times it seemed as though we were passing into another dimension.

It was at this time that I felt as if I was actually alone with no one else sharing my experience. I could actually feel my body become lighter and lighter, at the same time becoming less aware of the surroundings around me, becoming acutely aware of the sacred lands we were passing through, and the warning not to enter without permission of the tribal elders.

My thoughts were interrupted by a sudden jerk and a screeching of brakes, the bus was coming to a stop, we had reached our destination, Ubirr Rock, the home of Lightning Man, a very powerful figure from the Aboriginal Dreamtime.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Meaning of Life

 

Written by: Gary Wonning

The Meaning of life

I’ve traveled to various sacred sites all over the world, talked to Aboriginal elders, Maya Shamans, Native American shamans, psychics, hypnotists, and sometimes I don’t think I know any more about the meaning of life than anyone else. It seems as though it really doesn’t matter how much we know, or the visions we get, no one really knows what is going to happen next. One may know something is going to happen sooner or later, but we normally don’t know when or all of the details of the event.

Many times the final outcome is far different than we imagine or could even dream about. I have found many times, the final outcome, if left to the wishes of our Higher Self is far better than we could ever assume.

We, as human beings normally have a pretty narrow and limited vision of the possibilities of the soul. When a thought comes to us, we normally try to rationalize and determine how it relates to the reality we know not letting our inner guidance have anything to say about it. When we let our inner knowledge and the God Source determine the course to follow, the results are much more positive. 

A journey into unknown worlds

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Devil’s Marbles, Sacred Aboriginal Site

Written by: Gary Wonning

In the creation story of the Dreaming, the Rainbow Serpent fashioned the earth and then returned to a spot east of the Kimberley’s at a place where the rainbow meets the earth. The Rainbow Serpent’s eggs fossilized and became what non-Aborigines now call the Devils Marbles. The Aborigines know them as Karlu Karlu.

Because of this, the Devils Marbles Conservation Reserve is a spiritually significant and sacred site to the Aborigines.

photo of devil's marbles

Devil’s Marbles, Northern Territory, Australia

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Ayres Rock, or Uluru, in the Northern Territory of Australia

Written By: Gary Wonning

Uluru (Ayres Rock) is one of Australia’s most recognizable natural icons. The world-renowned sandstone formation stands 1,142 feet high,2,831 ft above sea level, with most of its bulk below the ground, and measures almost 6 miles in circumference. Both Uluru and Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) have great cultural significance for the Traditional landowners, who lead walking tours to inform visitors about the local flora and fauna, bush foods and the dream time stories of the area.

As the bus rumbled to a stop at the base of the giant monolith, my intuition was telling me to leave my camera gear in the bus. I had come all this way, I wasn’t going up that rock without my camera, I wanted some photos. My guides did everything possible to keep me from taking my gear, but I took it anyway.

Although the local Aborigines discourage climbing “The Rock”, many still do. For those that do, the view at the top is well worth the long climb. For those that climb, the only assistance available is a waist high chain to grab on to as one makes his way up the sometimes almost vertical path.

It was an extremely difficult climb, my right shoulder wasn’t entirely healed from the motorcycle accident, I had little strength in my right arm, as a result I needed to stop and rest every few feet.

Climbing to the top, the view is spectacular. Making one’s way across the rim, the view is breathtaking, not only in the distance but also on the rock itself.

At the top of this giant monolith, can be seen several pits and circles that were carved from the rock itself that must have been used for some ancient ceremony.

I found the pit, Hilda, my psychic had told me about the previous autumn. I lay down in it and tried to meditate, but there was too much activity surrounding me to continue. However, knowing how the universe works, I probably accomplished what I needed to. Sometimes we just need to touch base with the past.

I did take several photos while there, however, when I returned home and developed the slides, every one of them was completely black. Should have listened to my gut.

One of Uluru’s most unique features is that it appears to change color as the different light strikes it at different times of the day and year, sunset is a particularly remarkable sight when it briefly glows red. Although rainfall is uncommon in this semi-arid area, during wet periods the rock acquires a silvery-gray color, with streaks of black algae forming on the areas that serve as channels for water flow.

Special viewing areas with road access and parking have been constructed to give tourists the best views of Uluru at dawn and dusk.

As we watched the glow of Ayres Rock fade into the sunset, it was time to find our campground only a short distance away. It was well after dark when we arrived and set up camp for the evening, soon steaks were grilling on the campfire.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome