A Good Natured Prank

 

We were required to set the emergency brake at every delivery stop to prevent runaway accidents. This would lead to another possible prank. More often than not, someone would put grease on the underside of the emergency brakes of several drivers at once.

The driver wouldn’t use the brake until he reached his first stop, many times in isolated areas. The resulting mess was very difficult to clean up, and the perpetrators would spend the day chuckling about the presumed difficulties encountered by the victim. Most of us began carrying rags, just in case.

A good sense of humor was a necessity. It was all good natured fun, everyone laughed and no one got mad, (for the most part). It was back in the days before political correctness and people were still allowed to have fun and tell jokes, Gawd, I miss that!

Nowadays everyone is way too serious and often wear their feelings on their sleeves, just waiting for someone to insult them.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Advertisements

Basketball Is Serious Business

Just to illustrate how serious basketball is taken in Indiana, the following incident happened to my team in the seventh grade.

I attended a very small school in Napoleon Indiana. Typical of the several schools in the area, my seventh-grade class consisted of about thirty-five students.

As was the case in Indiana, the team from the neighboring town was always your fiercest rival, you would sooner cut off an arm than losing to those guys. Losing meant extreme humiliation until you could seek vengeance the following time you played each other.

Our rivals were the school in Osgood, which was only five miles away; their school was not as large a school as we were the seventh-grade class probably only had about twelve students. Almost every boy in the class played on the basketball team.

For the rest of the story.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Government Assistance

Written By: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book,”Those were the days, my friend.”

Our parents and community taught us to be self-reliant, it was frowned upon to accept assistance from anyone unless it was really needed, and then the community was more than glad to help. Everyone realized they could be in the same boat sometime and were more than willing to help.

It was a disgrace and Un-American to accept help from the government. People looked down on you for even thinking that. It was considered taking someone else’s money, almost like stealing.

In the 1950s, there was a surplus of corn; so the government came up with the grand idea of paying farmers not to farm their land, thereby artificially raising the prices. Named the soil bank, most of the farmers in our area were strongly opposed to it.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

It Pays to Not Be Bored

 

Written by: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book, “Those Were The Days.”

I soon learned that if I hung around the house, mom would find something for me to do, and it was normally something I didn’t want to do, so it was best to stay outside and play. I liked to aggravate her, but I soon found out that telling her I was bored wasn’t in my best interests.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Life On The Farm

Written By: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book, Those Were the Days My Friend.

It was a good life, growing up on a farm, I often felt sorry for my cousins who lived in Indianapolis. Financially they were better off than we were, but I had animals to be around, could go fishing anytime I wanted, a creek to play in and mom and dad pretty much let me roam anywhere I wanted on the farm.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Peak Season Frustrations, UPS

Written By; Gary Wonning

One of my first years on the job, I arrived back at the center about five o’clock on Christmas Eve. I was looking forward to going home and enjoying the evening attending church and unwrapping gifts with my family. I hadn’t been home before dark for a couple of months.

Lying in the middle of the floor of the center were a stack of parcels about four feet tall. There had been a late feeder arrive in Indianapolis that morning and consequently the parcels had missed the morning sort. The parcels were unloaded and sent to the extended centers during the day, and were waiting for us when we returned.

We were to find anything in the stack that was on our delivery area and go back out and deliver them. Man, I would sooner get hit with a blivet stick than go back out there. My delivery area is thirty five miles south of here, and I live fifteen miles north. But I knew I couldn’t enjoy my Christmas if I knew there was a parcel for some little kid in that pile and he or she wasn’t going to be able to get it before Christmas.

Reluctantly, hoping against hope I began looking for something. Thankfully, I found nothing that was on my area. I did find a couple addressed to my home town, I picked them up, grabbed a couple of delivery sheets and headed off to Batesville in my pick-up truck, delivering them on my way home.

The forgotten gifts were all delivered that evening; some drivers didn’t get home until after nine pm.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Early Days Of UPS

photo of UPS plaque

The plaque located on the exact spot where UPS first began operations

Written By: Gary Wonning

There were benefits to working at night. Naturally, living in Indiana, one is never far from a basketball hoop. No building is ever complete without one either inside or outside the building. Conveniently, in this situation, one was inside, so the night shift, which consisted of the mechanic and myself, always included at least one game of horse or one on one. Occasionally a driver or two would stop by and we could get a real game up.

In the early days things were pretty loose, our center manager normally was nowhere to be found and we were about eighty miles from Indianapolis, so most of the time we could operate under the radar. It was a time before time clocks. If a driver was running late due to a card game or he found a coon dog for sale, he could just write in the time he was supposed to be in instead of the time he actually returned, as long as he looked good on paper, nothing was said.

photo of purification

An oil for many uses

I remember one time a driver arrived back at the center and cautiously asked if any management was around, once the porter answered there wasn’t, he proceeded to unload two calves from the back of his car. Another time a driver was seen unloading some live chickens, not to mention the time a motorcycle was spotted being off loaded. Ah, those were the days.

They ended way too soon.

capiture of a ups driver making a delivery

A UPS driver making a delivery to a beautiful blonde

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome