Montezuma and Cortez

As it was in the new world before the coming of the Europeans.

Upon reaching Tenochitlan (Mexico City), Montezuma asked Cortés if he was the god Quetzalcoatl, who was predicted to return from the east as a white man with a beard and blue eyes, to stamp out human sacrifice and deliver the oppressed.

Cortés replied: “It was true that we came from where the sun rose, and were the vassals and servants of a great Prince called the Emperor Don Carlos, who held beneath his sway many and great princes, and that the Emperor having heard of him and what a great prince he was, had sent us to these parts to see him, and to beg them to become Christians, the same as our Emperor and all of us, so that his soul and those of all his vassals might be saved.”

Montezuma was in awe of Cortés and his men, primarily because of the ominous portents and signs that had recently occurred which were interpreted as foretelling Quetzalcoatl’s return and the end of the Aztec Empire, namely:

  • water of the lake around Mexico City boiling over due to volcanic eruption
  • unusual northern lights
  • comets
  • earthquakes
  • the temple of the sun god catching fire
  • eerie wailing noises at night
  • the king’s sister revived from her grave saying strange beings would enter the country and ruin it

Montezuma showed Cortés and his men their temples. There was a theater made of human skulls and mortar, wherein Gonzalo de Umbria counted 136,000 skulls, which included those in the steps and on poles. A tower was made of skulls too numerous to count.

There were obsidian knives, stone altars, black-robed priests with hair matted down with human blood, idols with basins for human blood, walls and steps covered with human blood and gore, an idol made out of seeds kneaded and ground with the blood of virgins and babies, pits where the human bodies were thrown after people had eaten off the arms and legs.

Bernal Diaz del Castillo recorded: “Our Captain said to Montezuma through our interpreter, half laughing: ‘Señor Montezuma, I do not understand how such a great Prince and wise man as you are has not come to the conclusion, in your mind, that these idols of yours are not gods, but evil things that are called devils and so that you may know it and all your priests may see it clearly, do me the favor to approve of my placing a cross here on the top of this tower.’”

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Cortez Enters Mexico

Right or wrong, this is the way it was.

Just two years after Martin Luther began the Reformation, on the other side of the world, 34-year-old Hernan Cortés landed in Central America in 1519. His conquistadors had the mixed motives of “God, Glory and Gold.”

In what he believed to be a holy cause, Cortés told his small army: “Soldiers of Spain, we are standing upon the verge of the greatest adventure ever undertaken by so small a body of men. We now leave the known world behind us: from this time forth we plunge into a region never before trodden by men of our race or religion. The hazards of this adventure I shall not dwell upon; they are well estimated by the bravest among you. … The shores we shall storm are lined with teeming millions of savages, unfriendly if not openly hostile. We have only our swords and our good right arms to protect us against their overwhelming numbers. Therefore let not childish strife or inner dissension weaken the front we must present to the enemy. If we go as united as we go courageously, we have nothing to fear, nothing to lose. … We are marching as Christians into a land of infidels. We seek not only to subdue boundless territory in the name of our Emperor Don Carlos, but to win millions of unsalvaged souls to the True Faith.”

Cortés ordered his ships sunk. There was no turning back.

With 500 men, 16 horses and 10 cannons, Cortés set out from Vera Cruz on Feb. 10, 1519, toward Tenochitlan-Mexico City. Mexico City was the capital of the Aztec Empire, which ruled Central America after the Mayan civilization peaked around 900 A.D.

The Aztec Empire consisted of 6 million people stretched over 200,000 square miles. As Americans today are shocked by reports of Planned Parenthood cutting out baby body parts and selling them, Cortes’ troops were likewise shocked by gruesome sights, such as:

  • prisoners with their hearts cut out
  • pyramid style temples covered with human blood
  • bodies of men and boys without arms or legs
  • human skulls stacked on poles
  • hundreds of thousands of human skulls arranged in piles
  • gnawed human bones piled in houses and streets
  • wooden houses built with grates jammed with captives awaiting sacrifice
  • pagan priests with hair matted with dried blood, the stench of carrion, sodomy
  • sacrificed humans rolled down temples where frenzied hoards ate them

This was part of their religion which believed the sun god needed human blood to live and that the Aztecs were responsible to feed him daily with captives from other tribes.

As the Spanish troops went from town to town, other Indian tribes were elated with hopes of being freed from Aztec rule which required them to provide youth for sacrifices. Cortés men freed captives, rolled idols down temple steps and erected crosses.

Francisco Lopez de Gomara, Cortés’ personal secretary and chaplain, reported how they found in Cozumel a Catholic priest, Gerónimo de Aguilar. He had been shipwrecked on Yucatan eight years earlier and had learned the language: “So Gerónimo de Aguilar preached to them about salvation, and, either because of what he told them, or because of the beginning they had already made, they were pleased to have their idols cast down, and they even assisted at it, breaking into small pieces what they had formerly held sacred. … And soon our Spaniards had left not a whole idol standing, and in each chapel they set up a Cross or the image of Our Lady, whom all the islanders worshiped with prayer and great devotion. … They begged Cortés to leave someone behind to teach them to believe in the God of the Christians; but he did not dare consent, for fear they might kill the preacher, and also because he had few priests and friars with him. And in this he did wrong, in view of their earnest request and supplications.”

In giving battle instructions, Cortés exhorted: “Sirs, let us follow our banner which bears the sign of the Holy Cross, and through it we shall conquer!”

The blogger has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Cozumel Mexico

Cozumel Mexico, locate off the coast of Belize in Central America is a beautiful and historic island, rich in Mayan history. Once, it was the island where Mayan women went to practice fertility rites. Mayan temples still adorn this tiny paradise island.

photo of the town of Cozumel

Cozumel Mexico

Tiny native stores at one time adorned the streets of the village, those have now been replaced with modern shopping centers, not unlike the United States. Some of the uniqueness of the island has been lost.

photo of teh Cozumel beach

The beach at Cozumel

Playa Mia Resort, located just north of the town offers a day of relaxing from the rigors of cruise life. Jet skiing, sailboating, parasailing, and snorkeling are just a few of the amenities available. If none of that appeals to you, relaxing and eating are also available.

photo  of the sign at Playa Mia

Playa Mia Resort in Cozumel

A tour bus leaves Playa Mia, escorting its passengers back to their cruise ship

photo of a small man and a big hat

Treasures in hand , it’s back to the ship

photo of a Mayan Pyramid

An interesting photo book about the Maya Indians of central America

 

Cabo San Lucas

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Cabo San Lucas commonly called Cabo  is a city at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. Cabo San Lucas together with San Jose Del Cabo is known as Los Cabos. As of 2010, the city had a population of 68,463.

Cabo has been rated as one of Mexico’s top 5 tourist destinations; it is known for its beaches, scuba diving, balnearios,  the sea arch  and marine life. The Los Cabos Corridor has become a holiday destination for tourists, with numerous resorts and timeshares along the coast between Cabo San Lucas and San José Del Cabo.

image

A cruise ship approaches Cabo San Lucas

 Continuously inhabited for over 10,000 years,  the area offers everything visitors and residents could ever need. Blessed with a perfect climate, a quiet bay and unlimited fishing the areas is a paradise to be enjoyed by all. Accessible by land or sea, it is an easy drive from the United States. Add to everything else the area has to offer, many fine restaurants  are found in the area.

Whether staying for a few hours on a cruise ship or spending a week, your time here would end way too soon.

 Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures. Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hardcover and Ebooks, and contact information: please check his website, http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments appreciated

money photography

This informative Ebook describes alternative methods of making money ,often a full time income in photography even if you have no desire to shoot wedding photography. this book gives examples and websites where you can use your photos to supply you with an income, not only to enable you to buy new equipment, but a living income

 

Acapulco

Acapulco was named by the Nahua tribe, the name means “where the reeds stood” or place of giant reeds”
Archaeological finds show that when theSpaniards arrived, people had been living around the bay area for about 2,000 years.
The Nahua were conquered by the Aztec empire about a hundred years before it fell to the Spanish conquistadors.
By order of Hernan Cortez, Spanish sailors took the Bahia de Acapulco in 1521. Port and shipbuilding facilities were established and itwas the jumping-off point for further explorations and conquests, such as that of Peru. It became theonly port in the New World authorized to receive Spanish Galleons from the Philippines and China.
All this treasure was an invitation Dutch and English pirates could not resist, and by the 17th century, their ships abounded in the Pacific and along the coastline of Mexico and Baja California.
To ward off the pirates, Fuerte deSan Diego was built atop a low hill overlooking the bay. Because of the seaport’s strategic importance to the Spanish crown, Fuerte de San Diego became a focus of rebellion in1812 when the discontented population roseup against their Spanish colonial rulers in the war of independence.
The royalists were besieged in the fort for four months before finally surrendering to the Mexican troops.
As the capital grew, its citizens began flocking to the Pacific coast for vacations. A new international airport was
built, and by the 1960s Acapulco was a booming resort, its reputation as a playground for the rich and famous set, often from within Mexico, rather than from outside the country.
The city is nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Sierra Madre Mountains on the other. Along the Costera Miguel  Ale-man, the cities principle thoroughfare, you’ll find most of the major hotels, restaurants, and shopping centers.
You will also find the cultural heart of the city, known to the locals as Acapulco Traditional. Among the sights is the Fort
San Diego, which protected Acapulco from Dutch and English pirates in the days of Spanish Rule.
Originally constructed in 161 and rebuilt in1776 following a massive earthquake. It is a classic five-point fortress surrounded by a moat.
Acapulco was fist inhabited by primitive Indians. Later on people ofNahuati stock, the Nahoas, came and settled the area. THe name Acapulco derives from the Nahuatl words”acatl” (place of canes). “pol”(to break) and
“co”that indicates place.
The first “tourist” to visit Acapulco was a Chinese Monk by the name of Fa Hsien. As the legend goes, he arrived in Pre-
Historic times around 417 AD, long before Columbus crossed the Atlantic to “discover” America.
Today ,Acapulco remains a popular destination not only a a vcation resort, but a cruise port as well.

Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature,landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt,the Canary Islands,much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed and applied what he has learned to solving the many issues facing not only the United States, but the world as well.

Common Sense solutions to complex problems.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website.www.commonsensejourneys.com

You can also follow him on your Kindle.

Ixtapa, Mexico Poster
Ixtapa, Mexico Poster by lifejourneysimages
Browse Cruise Posters online at Zazzle.com

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Cabo San Lucas

Los Cabos (The Capes) is not actually a town. It is the name Mexican officials bestowed upon tow once-remote Baja California communities.
 
Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo as well as the stretch of coast that connects them know as the Corridor”.
Cabo
 
Seafarers have long been attracted to the shores of what is now Los Cabios. IN the late 16th century and early 17th
century, according to legend, notorious pirates such as Sir Francis Drake and Thomas Cavendish concealed themselves in the bays and coves along the southern coast of the Baja Peninsula, slipping out to ambush passing Spanish Galleons.
 
Later, Spanish missionaries attempted to convert the Guaycura and Pericu natives to Christianity, but by the early 1800s, Spanish soldiers and European diseases had decimated the indigenous population.
 
After the missionaries moved on, the rocky spires and arches that characterize the southern tip of the Baja California went pretty much unnoticed until after world War 11 when private planes began flying in such dignitaries such as John Wayne and Bing Crosby to go deep sea fishing.
 
Because the area was remote and difficult to reach,it remained the private hideaway of a few well-heeled travelers until the 1970s when the Mexican government completed the Trans peninsular Highway. The highway gave Californians a straight shot to the tip of the Baja California.
 
It’s one of the most poplar destinations of the region. It boasts fine beaches,luxurious surroundings, lively nightlife, and some of the best sport fishing in the world.
 
Cabo San Lucas, with a population of 60,000, is the fastest t growing of the two towns, in the past few years, swanky new hotels and condos have filled the landscape along the 20 mile corridor separating the two towns.
Superb sport fishing put Cabo San Lucas on the map, but non-fisherman will enjoy the thriving beach community as well.
The coastal Highlights tour highlights dramatic desert terrain and showcases resort development.
 
You’ll also spend time in the traditional town of San Jose del Cabo.
 
By the 1930s, a small fishing village and cannery occupied the north end of the Cabo San Lucas harbor, inhabited by approximately 400 hardy souls.
 
The cape region experienced a sport fishing craze in the 1950s and 60s. Due to the prolific bill fishing, waters off the peninsula’s southern tip earned the name “Marlin Alley”, Fly in anglers and wealthy pleasure boasters brought
back glorious stories of this wild place which fueled population growth to around 1,500 by the time the Trans peninsular Highway was completed in1973. Following the paved highway link between the United States and
Cabo San Luca, the town transformed from a fly-in sailing resort to an automobile and RV destination.
 

Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature,landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt,the Canary Islands,much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

Common Sense solutions to complex problems.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website.www.commonsensejourneys.com

You can also follow him on your Kindle.

Photography Prints

 

money photography

This informative Ebook describes alternative methods of making money ,often a full time income in photography even if you have no desire to shoot wedding photography. this book gives examples and websites where you can use your photos to supply you with an income, not only to enable you to buy new equipment, but a living income as well.

 

Puerto Vallarta

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Sailing out of Puerto Vallarta

Only a few U.S. residents ventured to Puerto Vallarta until the 1950s. That’s when airplanes began landing on a dirt
airstrip just outside of the city. By the 1960s, the town was a hideaway for movie stars who enjoyed the charm and
serenity of the area.
Downtown Puerto Vallarta
Downtown Puerto Vallarta
 
About that time Hollywood really ignited interest in the city. In 1963, director John Huston chose Puerto Vallarta as
the film location of Tennessee William’s “Night of the Iguana”, which starred Richard Burton, Deborah Kerr, and Ava Garner.
 
Much of the filming was done in the deserted cove of Mismaloya. The film gave Vallarta its reputation as a steamy
romantic escape, and soon large numbers of travelers went to experience it for themselves. In 1968, a road was built
from Tepic to accommodate the flow of visitors.
 
By 1974, the boom in construction and population was on, and the area blossomed with more than 350,000 residents
and about three million visitors each year.
Mr Creme PV
Mr.Creme‘s, best breakfast in the Western Hemisphere
 
This is a city with modern infrastructure and conveniences that have somehow managed to maintain its unique Old Mexican charm, unlike so many more glitzy resorts. In many areas of Puerto Vallarta you will feel like you are taking a
step back in time. A step back to a much simpler time. Donkeys are still used for delivery in many parts of this unique
city.
ship leaving PV
 
Cruise ship leaving port
 
A modern marina and cruise ship port attract visitors on ships from all over the world. The City’s clean, friendly
atmosphere, unique Mexican ambiance and incredible diverse shopping attract international and Mexican tourists
in droves. These unique attractions lure many to return overand over again. Many of these tourists end up becoming full time residents or retire in Puerto Vallarta.
 
The Gustavo Ordiaz International Airport is located2 miles or 5 minutes north of town

The Author has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has visited.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks, and contact information: please check his website.www.journeysthrulife.com

You can also follow him on your Kindle.

Improve your health, Increase your wealth

Improve your health, Increase your wealth

Mayan book

It doesn’t take long to discover that Belize is a land of contrasts. From the poverty and disarray of the cities to the quiet countryside, many differences are soon found. With poverty and crime running rampant in cities such as Belize City and Belmopan, the traveler has to be constantly aware of his surroundings and protect whatever is being carried. Remember, that camera hanging around your neck is worth more than the average Belizean earns in a year. All that aside, the Mayan people are wonderfully warm people many of whom go out of their way to please visitors. Traveling into the countryside one discovers thatch roof homes with no doors or windows. Because of the warm climate, they can live comfortably all year with a gentle breeze flowing through the open windows and doors. I was struck with the concept that although no utility lines were visible, a lot of homes had a satellite dish in the front yard.

Available in both paperback and ebook format.

Art Prints