Major Wolf and Masonry in the Civil War

 

During the Civil War, Confederate Major Enoch Obid Wolf (1829-1910) served with Ford’s Battalion Arkansas Cavalry, Company C. In 1863 he was captured by the Union forces.

He was taken prisoners and along with six other was to be shot in retaliation for the shooting of a Union officer.

Major Wolf, a Freemason, cut a piece from his cane and fashioned a masonic ring from it.

His masonic brothers went to work with a zeal that is only known to a worthy brother in distress and wired to Washington and as a consequence President Lincoln issued a reprieve that arrived just as the firing squad were loading their weapons.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Masonic Brotherhood in the Civil War

 

A second reason why Masonry held together is that membership in a Masonic Lodge is by choice only. No man has ever been recruited into joining a Lodge. Our rules, in fact, prohibit Masons from actively pursuing someone for initiation. Instead, a man interested in becoming a Mason must, “of his own free will and accord,” actively seek out a member of the Lodge which he wishes to join and ask him for a petition for membership.

The third reason is the structure of the Craft itself. There are a number of internal rules and customs that helped the Lodge as a whole avoid the turbulent politics and divisiveness of the War. This allowed the Lodge to continue to function as a place a man could go when he needed help or a quiet haven from the storms that raged outside the Craft. It was then and continues to be today, a place where true brotherhood exists.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonry During the Civil War

 

 

An excerpt from my new book.

The Civil War was the single most divisive event in our nation’s long history. No other war, political event, or national crisis has ever approached the levels of animosity and hatred that the Civil War caused. Brother fought against brother. Fathers against sons. Families were forever split over the idealism of the War. They were not alone. Major national organizations, notably the Baptist Churches, also broke up over the issues of slavery and States’ Rights. The War seemed to destroy the bonds of any organization it touched.

All the organizations, that is, except one: Freemasonry. While the War raged around them, Freemasons held on to the ties and the idealism that brought them together in the first place. Thousands of Masons fought in the War, and many died. But the tenets of the Craft, those ideals and moral codes that we, as Freemasons, strive to abide by, were able to overcome the hatred and the animosity that the War generated.

There are a number of reasons why this organization, more than any other, was able to survive the tumult that was the Civil War. A major reason is the long and storied history of the Craft. The beliefs and tenets of the Lodge predate not only the Civil War, but the Constitution, the discovery of the New World, and, according to some, even the birth of Christ. When a tradition of that many years exists, it is difficult to ignore.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Masonic Civil War Stories

 

An excerpt from my latest book:

“My father had been a soldier in the Union Army. . .He was made a Mason in a military Lodge. . .Taken prisoner at Arkansas Post, he was carried up the Mississippi River to Rock Island, Illinois. . .My father became. . . desperately ill, and made himself known as a Mason to an officer of the camp. The officer took him to his own home and nursed him back to life. When the war ended, he loaned Father money to pay his way back to his Texas home, and gave him a pearl-handled pistol to protect himself. . .This experience of my father, when I learned about it, had a very great influence upon my life. . .; the fact that such a fraternity of men could exist, mitigating the harshness of war, and remain unbroken when states and churches were torn in two, became a wonder; and it is not strange that I tried for years to repay my debt to it.”

    — Joseph Fort Newton, D.D. in River of Years

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Change The Country, Educate the Kids

 

Written by: Gary Wonning

Change the Country, Educate the kids

Much has been said about changing the direction the country is headed, recent polls show that a large majority of the American people believe the country is and has been headed in the wrong direction for quite some time.

This is a problem that has developed over the last several decades and as a result, there is no fast fix. Thankfully, because of the Internet, and the easy access to information, more and more people are becoming interested in the political future of their nation and realize that something must be done in order to protect our freedom and capitalistic way of life.

This is all well and good and is the way it should be. Our government was formed to provide for government of the people, by the people, and for the people, not special interest groups. The quick fix to saving our way of life is to get involved and stay informed. Thankfully the Tea Party is providing a way to counteract some of the disgusting things going on in Washington.

We need to begin, at an early age, to educate the kids on what freedom means, how our country was formed, and the importance that religion and spirituality played in the early, formative times of our republic.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Gnostic Resurrection

In the Gnostic work, Treatise Resurrection, ordinary human existence is described as spiritual death whereas the resurrection is the moment of enlightenment revealing what truly exists. Whoever grasps this idea becomes spiritually alive and can be resurrected from the dead immediately.

The Gospel of Phillip says:

Those who say they will die first and then rise are in error, they must receive the resurrection while they live.

This is in direct conflict with the church that believes only those who have had direct access to Christ, or their representatives have direct access to the resurrection, all others must go through them.

Most Gnostics view Jesus, not as a God, but as the man who illuminated the pathway.

Whoever sees the Lord through inner vision can claim his or her own authority equals or surpasses that of the apostles and their successors.

In other words, they don’t need an intermediary to communicate with God.

The concept of gnosis(knowledge) is the exact opposite of the Church’s concept of faith. and it is the type of thought process that fits well with masonry.

The blogger has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Reliving Fredericksburg, Virginia

Written By: Gary Wonning

After a sleepless night, it was time to find out what Fredericksburg was all about. Totally oblivious to what I would see or find, I exited the freeway and drove into the tiny city. A cemetery suddenly caught my eye. My first thought was,”Where did cemetery come from?”

It was then I observed a small sign near the entrance.

It was a Civil War Cemetery. My next thought was.” Oh, it’s a Civil War Cemetery, that wasn’t here when I was here before. “

Where did that thought come from? And why did I think that?

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

More surprises awaited me, as I drove into town I couldn’t believe what I was seeing! This town is almost a carbon copy of Vevay Indiana. The main street was very similar to the main street in Vevay, the river was on the right, and there was a Rising Sun Tavern on the east side of town. I soon found my reason for spending so much time in Vevay was to be a gentle reminder of a time in the past. I had been to Fredericksburg before.

In times such as this, I get very hungry, a lunch at the Rising Sun Tavern was definitely on the agenda. Entering the tavern, it was DeJa vu all over again. I can remember the many times had I dined and drank my favorite beverage in the friendly confines of this establishment.

Walking around the town was truly amazing, just like old home week, past another cemetery which held the remains of many Revolutionary War people, both soldiers and townspeople.

photo os the home lodge of George Washington

George Washington’s Home Lodge

Touring the Masonic Lodge I could see myself attending many lodge meetings in an earlier era.