Growing Up In Indiana: Entertainment on a Saturday Night

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Times were simple, it was an uncomplicated life back then.

Growing up in the 50s, we were the fortunate ones. Little did we know what lie ahead of those innocent times.Life was hard but good. Money wasn’t an issue, nobody had any.

Our entertainment was simple, we either went to see friends and ate popcorn, or we went shopping in a grocery store with two aisles and stopped at grandmas on the way home. Or we stayed home.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

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The Indy 500

 

We lived about seventy miles from the Indianapolis 500 Motor Speedway. in those days, during the month of May, there was daily activity at the track. The drivers and teams would practice daily during the whole month of May in preparation for the big Memorial Day classic.  In the early days, qualifications would take two weekends and was normally interrupted by rain or bad weather.

The drivers and teams would practice daily during the whole month of May in preparation for the big Memorial Day classic.  In the early days, qualifications would take two weekends and was normally interrupted by rain or bad weather.

The race was always held on May thirtieth, making it fall on a weekday more often than not.

I can always remember listening to the race; every activity would stop so we could gather around the radio to listen to the pageantry from beginning to end.

The first race I remember was in 1953 when a lot of the old timers were still racing, Eddie Sachs, Billy Vukovich, Johnny Parsons and others always provided an exciting race.

It was a sad day in 1954 when Billy Vukovich was killed during the annual classic.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

A Good Natured Prank

 

We were required to set the emergency brake at every delivery stop to prevent runaway accidents. This would lead to another possible prank. More often than not, someone would put grease on the underside of the emergency brakes of several drivers at once.

The driver wouldn’t use the brake until he reached his first stop, many times in isolated areas. The resulting mess was very difficult to clean up, and the perpetrators would spend the day chuckling about the presumed difficulties encountered by the victim. Most of us began carrying rags, just in case.

A good sense of humor was a necessity. It was all good natured fun, everyone laughed and no one got mad, (for the most part). It was back in the days before political correctness and people were still allowed to have fun and tell jokes, Gawd, I miss that!

Nowadays everyone is way too serious and often wear their feelings on their sleeves, just waiting for someone to insult them.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Last Day of School

 

I rode my scooter to school the last day of my eighth grade, against my parent’s better judgement. I promised I wouldn’t let anyone else drive it, of course, that didn’t work out very well.

Arriving at school, Steve Tunny wanted to drive it around the block. I didn’t want to let him drive, however, he finally persuaded me. I decided it would be ok if I rode on the back. As if that was going to keep him from doing something he shouldn’t.

The next thing I knew, he was driving across a small muddy ditch. In an instant, the scooter flipped upside down and we’re headed straight for a telephone pole. Luckily, we missed the pole and only had scratches on our elbows and mud on the handlebars of the scooter, the only thing hurt was my pride.

You think I told anyone? Nope.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Been in the Army Long

 

As I grabbed a parcel and jumped from my package car, I noticed an old gentleman wearing a tattered army fatigue jacket standing next to my car. The man was very old, had poor eyesight, obviously a retired world war two vet. He looked up at me in my brown uniform standing next to my brown vehicle and asked, “How long you been in the Army?”

I replied, “Just a few years,” and proceeded to walk into the bank. No further explanation was needed.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Cushman Motor Scooter

When I was about fourteen, I was able to buy a motor scooter with the money I had saved up by working various farming jobs, including baling hay. At last, I had something to drive other than a tractor. It was a Cushman “Box” scooter. I think that at one time they were used by the military during the “Big” war.

photo of a Cushman scooter

Riding the Cushman

It was in dire need of a paint job, so I tore it down and with the help of dad sanded and repainted it. I have to admit, it looked pretty cool when I was done. It was my pride and joy; I drove that thing everywhere, through the creek, across fields and even on the road as long as the road wasn’t heavily traveled.

The best part was that I now had transportation to my hay baling jobs.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Winning The Big Game

 

Our freshman year, the varsity team won a sectional game but were defeated the next game, thus ended our quest for a state championship.

It was an Indiana custom for a school to have a celebration if their team won any championship games in the state playoffs.

We never won a championship, but our team had won a game, the school administration decided we should celebrate, so they scheduled a school dance the Monday morning following the sectional. It turned out to be quite a big deal; luckily, I had worn my peg leg blue jeans and white bucks to school that day.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome