Life on the Farm: Feeding The Cattle

Photography Prints

Written by Gary Wonning

As the next summer approached, it was obvious the whole family had enough of farming. As soon as his back healed, dad was planning on getting a job at the local factory. It wasn’t something he wanted to do, but it was out of necessity.

He never really said anything, but I know deep down inside, he would have much sooner been on the farm than working in a sweaty old factory.

The summer wore on, our pasture was getting shorter and shorter, and the dry summer days didn’t help provide food for our cattle. Each time I went into town to buy feed, the money became scarcer. Providing food for the cattle was becoming a real concern.

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

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The Life of a UPS Driver: A Snowy Day

Art Prints

 

Written by Gary Wonning

The day began like many others, a chill in the air and a chance of snow. Soon after arriving in Vevay, the snow really began to come down and before I knew it, there was nearly a foot of the white stuff on the ground.

Knowing the roads would be a lot worse  in the high country, I soon became concerned I may not be able to get home. Occasionally, drivers had not been able to get back until after midnight on such days. On one such day, Don drove back to Osgood after midnight with no windshield. He  slid off the road and a tree limb struck the windshield, breaking it.

As I left Vevay and drove through Markland, it was getting worse by the minute. This road isn’t traveled much on a good day and there hadn’t been anyone through here for a while. Over a foot of snow covered the road and I had no idea where the edge of the road was. A tractor trailer was coming right at me and he didn’t know where the road was either. As he approached me, the right side of his trailer dropped off the road and it began to jack knife.

This isn’t going to be pretty. Determining how and where I was going to get out of his way, he suddenly got his truck straightened out, just in time. We missed by inches.

It became obvious I wasn’t going to be able to finish my day; the trick now was to just get home. I’m not sure how that is going to happen, eventually, I need to go up a hill but that will be difficult, I can hardly maintain any speed on flat ground.

The adventures and misadventures of a UPS driver.

capiture of a ups driver making a delivery

A UPS driver making a delivery to a beautiful blonde

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Dad is Disabled For a Year: Growing up in Indiana in the 50s

Art Prints

 

Written by Gary Wonning

One day, while carrying the milk cans, dad slipped on some mud. As a result, he injured his back and he became bedfast for a year.

Suddenly the task of doing all the farming fell on my shoulders. This included putting out the crops, cultivating, putting up the hay, harvesting them and milking thirty head of cattle morning and night, as well as getting feed for them from the feed mill.

There wasn’t much choice but to jump in and do it. I didn’t mind too much, my parents needed help and I considered it a challenge to see if I could do it. All things considered, everything went as well as could be expected. I somehow managed to get the work done, have a social life, and lead the life a normal sixteen year old would and should have.

At times it was a struggle making it all work, but all in all I learned a lot and enjoyed the challenge. Actually we had too many cattle for the acreage we had. With over thirty head of cattle on sixty-five acres of farmland, it was hard to raise enough food for them, as time went on, we found ourselves buying more and more feed for them. This cut into the profits more and more, every day and we struggled to make ends meet.

The rest of the story!

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Best Of Both Worlds

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

My dad was sick for a couple of weeks when I was in the eighth grade. I said I could do the milking by myself, but dad insisted on getting my cousin to help. Of course, if you put two teenagers together, things happen. We did a good job of milking the cows, but somehow it seemed to take longer and we never could make it to school for the first morning class.

That didn’t bother me, we just happened to be studying Macbeth those two weeks in eighth grade literature and I hated it.

It was the best of two worlds, I got to make money milking cows and I missed studying Macbeth, and got credit for being there.

Art Prints

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

 

Baling Hay on the Farm

 

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Always eager to make a buck, the best way to motivate me was to throw money my way.

There wasn’t much chance to make money in those days.

There were no fast food restaurants, and I lived far enough from town that made getting a job in town impractical, additionally, most of the businesses were small family owned operations and they relied mainly on family members to supplement what extra help they might need.

My main source of income became baling hay and straw and helping a couple of neighbors with their farm work.

I liked that better than working in town, I liked the hard work and being outside in the fresh air.

I started when I was real young, so at first most of my work was for free, and when finally someone paid me, I was elated.

Even though it was hard work, baling hay was generally fun.

We would have a crew of four or five high school boys and we would always find a way to have some fun while challenging each other and some good natured kidding always went with the territory.

They would probably call it harassment in today’s world.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Art Prints

 

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Growing Up in the 50s: A Social Life And Milking

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Sometimes it was hard to squeeze a social life into the farm scene. Going to the basketball games was a required course in school, missing a ball game was out of the question, a person could get banned from his community from such an atrocious act.

When the game was played at a school several miles from home, it was a real challenge.

There was only about forty-five minutes from the time I would arrive home from school until the bus would leave from the school to go to the game.

That didn’t leave much time for milking thirty head of cows.

But I got’er done. The stanchions held four cows and we had two milkers. So I would run two cows in, wash them, put the milkers on, feed them, bring two more in, prepare them, take the milkers off the first two and put them on the second two and repeat the process until I finished.

I could milk thirty cows in thirty minutes. At these stressed times, the cows didn’t give much milk, the milkers weren’t on long enough, and they didn’t eat much either. But they made up for it the next morning.

You couldn’t do that twice in a row or the cows would get mastitis, but when there is an emergency such as getting to a ball game, you gotta do what you gotta do.

Art Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Indiana: Surviving A Blizzard On the Farm

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

We were living on the farm on a dirt road that didn’t see much traffic.

It was always a problem in the winter when the snows set in. The only people who used our road were the people who lived on it, and there were only three, hence when the snows came, our road was one of the last to be cleared by the county workmen.

The electricity would normally go off also; this would create a real problem since we were milking about thirty head of dairy cattle and it normally became my job because dad and our closest neighbor would work day and night shoveling snow off the road so we could get out and get our milk to market.

I would start milking about eight am, finish about noon, and start in again at about one pm so I could be finished before dark. After a couple of days, I would be running out of cans to store the milk.

We drank extra milk so as not to waste it. We couldn’t get to the store to buy groceries, so drinking more milk became a viable option

It would always be several days before the milk truck could get down our road, so It was really important to get the road open as soon as possible so we could meet the milk truck on the adjoining road.

photoof waterfall

Harveys Branch near Oldenburg Indiana

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way, he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.