Christmas Shopping

Written By: Gary Wonning

In those days, living in the country as we did, there were no large department stores nearby. I don’t remember ever being in a large store until I was in my teens.

Therefore, our Christmas shopping was out of a Sears and Roebuck catalog. I couldn’t wait until the Christmas catalog arrived in mid-October and would anxiously shuffle through it to find things Santa could bring. Of course, I was always threatened, if I misbehaved, Santa would bring a lump of coal, It seemed there was always someone we knew would get lumps of coal on Christmas morning instead of presents.

Relive live life in the fifties

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of the Pilons

The Pilons, historic landmark in St. Lucia

Peak Season Frustrations, UPS

Written By; Gary Wonning

One of my first years on the job, I arrived back at the center about five o’clock on Christmas Eve. I was looking forward to going home and enjoying the evening attending church and unwrapping gifts with my family. I hadn’t been home before dark for a couple of months.

Lying in the middle of the floor of the center were a stack of parcels about four feet tall. There had been a late feeder arrive in Indianapolis that morning and consequently the parcels had missed the morning sort. The parcels were unloaded and sent to the extended centers during the day, and were waiting for us when we returned.

We were to find anything in the stack that was on our delivery area and go back out and deliver them. Man, I would sooner get hit with a blivet stick than go back out there. My delivery area is thirty five miles south of here, and I live fifteen miles north. But I knew I couldn’t enjoy my Christmas if I knew there was a parcel for some little kid in that pile and he or she wasn’t going to be able to get it before Christmas.

Reluctantly, hoping against hope I began looking for something. Thankfully, I found nothing that was on my area. I did find a couple addressed to my home town, I picked them up, grabbed a couple of delivery sheets and headed off to Batesville in my pick-up truck, delivering them on my way home.

The forgotten gifts were all delivered that evening; some drivers didn’t get home until after nine pm.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The First Four Years Of School

Written By: Gary Wonning

The first four years of school, I had a bus driver who couldn’t keep any order. The bus ride became a real adventure, I was one of the youngest and not having any siblings to help me out, I became quite masterful at the art of diplomacy and became adept at staying unnoticed as to not invite the wrath of upper-class boys and girls who were bent on creating a disturbance.

One never knew quite what to expect and whatever happened it was always an adventure.

The bus had no heater, so one evening several senior girls decided it would be a good idea to build a fire in the aisle of the bus using old homework papers as fuel. It didn’t provide any heat, just some entertainment for a few moments.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Surviving The Winter Down On the Farm

Written By: Gary Wonning

To be able to go to school every day we would wait at an intersection along the highway for the school bus to arrive in the morning and dad would be there waiting for me when the bus arrived back in the evening.

It was the end of March before Santa found out where I was living. When I came home from school one evening, there in a Montgomery Ward shopping bag was my basketball lying in Grandpa’s chair waiting for me. No Christmas wrappings, I guess Santa ran out of paper.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Humorous Side Of The Fire (Those Were the Days)

photo of the Cozumel beach

The beach at Cozumel

Written By: Gary Wonning

Besides the car ride home, the day did have its humorous moments. One of our neighbors, seeing the smoke from the house came down to investigate. Finding no one home, he began to take the washed clothes off the clothesline my mom had hung up before her nap. After he had all the clothes in his arms, he discovered there was nowhere to put them, so he hung them back up.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Safety First At UPS

Written By: Gary Wonning

Before a driver is set free on his own he must first undergo five days of driver training during which time a  driver supervisor rides with him every day and instructs him in not only correct delivery procedures but safe driving and safe work habits and practices as well.

I was a young know it all rebel and I decided I didn’t really have to follow all the rules. Joe Mulford, my center manager kept insisting in the necessity to back into a delivery stop before making the delivery. It was safer because the driver would have the big picture as he came to the stop and could see everything in the surrounding area, thus making it less likely he would unintentionally back into something. Plus, it would give the customer time to come to the door as they heard us backing into the driveway, thereby saving us time.

photo of the Pilons

The Pilons, historic landmark in St. Lucia

For some reason, I decided this was a rule I didn’t need to follow and kept pulling into driveways. Finally, after maybe a half dozen of these deliveries, he suddenly yelled,”Stop, Stop, you just ran over a kid.”

He then proceeded to stand about a foot away from me and chewed my butt for about five minutes. It brought back visions of basic training at Lackland Air Force Base. I never pulled into a driveway from that day forward, I’ve  been retired for twenty years, I still don’t pull in.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Church and School Life In the 50s

Written By: Gary Wonning

Attending Sunday school and church was something we did every Sunday, almost without fail. We would do at least one or the other or both. Dad worked driving the milk truck on Sunday so he didn’t go as much as mom and I did.

Occasionally, if mom didn’t want to go to Sunday school, I would ride my bike the two miles to church if the weather allowed. I didn’t walk two miles uphill to school every day through knee deep snow, but I did occasionally ride my bike two miles to Sunday school, and one way was uphill.

We went to a small struggling country church and almost everyone was related one way or another, so going to church was almost like a family reunion.

Our social and spiritual life was centered around the church.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome