Keep the Old Values That Have Stood the Test Of Time

 

As the world changes and old ways are tossed out the window, we need to remember to hang on to what is near and dear to us, to cling to the universal truths that never change, even though society and customs do.

Times and customs regularly change, as they should. However, many ideas have stood the test of time and should never be discarded.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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An American’s Creed

 

American’s creed

I do not choose to be a common man, it is my right to be uncommon.

I seek the opportunity to develop whatever talents God gave me, Not security.

I do not wish to be a melt citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me.

I want to take the calculated risk to dream and to build. To fail and to succeed.

I refuse to barter incentive for a dole. I prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence, the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of utopia.

I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my duty for a handout.

I will never cower before any earthly master nor bend to any threat.

It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid, to think and act myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations and to face the world boldly and say this with God’s help, I have done all this.

This is what it means to be an American.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Laws of Nature, or Nature’s God

 

The laws of nature influence every phase of human existence.  Like it or not we are all governed by them in all walks of life. But that doesn’t mean we are held captive to what God thinks, we all have free will, we are controlled by our actions as it relates to our future. When we act in a certain manner, it will determine what we experience in the future.

This influences every aspect of our life. We sow what we reap.

If we treat others badly or spend foolishly, it will come back to bite us sooner or later, it’s a law of nature, there is no getting around it. Some call it karma.

In this day and age, many think they can do or say as they please and there will be no consequences.

In this live and let live society, many think there are no consequences for their actions and others just have to deal with the improper actions they perform, they just have to get over it.

Sorry, it doesn’t work that way. Sooner or later, the chickens will come home to roost.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Seeing the Future : Our Country in Conflict

At an early age, about five or six, I remember standing in front of our farmhouse, looking east and seeing our nation’s capital in flames.

I was living in Indiana at the time, this was the early fifties and being quite young, I hardly knew what Washington D.C. was. I just knew that sometime in the future, which I perceived to be sometime around the turn of the century, about 2007 or 2008 I knew there would be much conflict, and freedom would hang in the balance. 

At the time I never understood and even though it stuck in my mind, I never really thought too much about it.

Again, in the 1980s, I was reminded by a well-known psychic that the turn of the century would be a trying time for our nation. She said much of the conflict would arise from people not only not instilling common values in their children, but also, even though some of the children were raised correctly, many would stray from the path.

Even then, it didn’t really soak in what spirit was trying to tell me, she said I would be ok as long as I stayed out of the major cities.

The time is here, and I now understand, we, as a nation have done much to undermine our security and freedom. We have forgotten the values that made this country great. The only way to preserve our nation is to return to those principles that our country was founded on and lead our founders to establish the greatest country the world has even known.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Change The Country, Educate the Kids

 

Written by: Gary Wonning

Change the Country, Educate the kids

Much has been said about changing the direction the country is headed, recent polls show that a large majority of the American people believe the country is and has been headed in the wrong direction for quite some time.

This is a problem that has developed over the last several decades and as a result, there is no fast fix. Thankfully, because of the Internet, and the easy access to information, more and more people are becoming interested in the political future of their nation and realize that something must be done in order to protect our freedom and capitalistic way of life.

This is all well and good and is the way it should be. Our government was formed to provide for government of the people, by the people, and for the people, not special interest groups. The quick fix to saving our way of life is to get involved and stay informed. Thankfully the Tea Party is providing a way to counteract some of the disgusting things going on in Washington.

We need to begin, at an early age, to educate the kids on what freedom means, how our country was formed, and the importance that religion and spirituality played in the early, formative times of our republic.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Ronald Reagan Told Us What We Need To Say Today

Normally I only publish my own thoughts, but occasionally I find something extremely important and I republish the article, this is one of those times.

There were ten major persecutions of Christians in the first three centuries:

  1. Nero A.D. 54-68
  2. Domition A.D. 81- 96
  3. Trajan A.D. 98-117
  4. Antoninus Pius & Marcus Aurelius Antoninus A.D. 138-180
  5. Severus A.D. 193 – 211
  6. Maximus A.D. 235-238
  7. Decius A.D. 249-251
  8. Valerian A.D. 253-260
  9. Aurelian A.D. 274-287
  10. Diocletian A.D. 292-304

Emperor Diocletian’s persecution was the worst. When Diocletian had lost battles in Persia, his generals told him it was because they had neglected the Roman gods. Diocletian ordered all military personnel to worship the Roman gods, thus forcing Christians either into the closet or out of the army.

After purging Christians from the military, Diocletian surrounded himself with public opponents of Christianity. He revoked the tolerance issued a previous Emperor Gallienus in 260 AD, and then used the military to force all of Rome to worship pagan gods. In 303 A.D., Diocletian consulted the Oracle Temple of Apollo at Didyma, which told him to initiate a great empire-wide persecution of the Christian church.

What followed was an intolerant, hateful and severe persecution of Christians. Diocletian had his military go systematically province by province arresting church leaders, burning scriptures, destroying churches, cutting out tongues, boiling Christians alive and decapitating them.

From Europe to North Africa, thousands were martyred. The faithful cried out in fervent prayer. Then Diocletian was struck with a painful intestinal disease and resigned on MAY 1, 305 A.D.

Emperor Gelarius continued the persecution, but he too was struck with the intestinal disease and died.

Commenting on Roman persecutions was Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan, who was the Democrat Party’s candidate for president in 1896, 1900, and 1908. William Jennings Bryan stated in his speech, “The Prince of Peace,” (New York Times, Sept. 7, 1913): “I can imagine that the early Christians who were carried into the Coliseum to make a spectacle for those more savage than the beasts, were entreated by their doubting companions not to endanger their lives. But, kneeling in the center of the arena, they prayed and sang until they were devoured. …”

William Jennings Bryan continued: “How helpless they seemed, and, measured by every human rule, how hopeless was their cause! And yet within a few decades the power which they invoked proved mightier than the legions of the Emperor, and the faith in which they died was triumphant o’er all the land. … They were greater conquerors in their death than they could have been had they purchased life.”

President Ronald Reagan commented on the Roman Coliseum at the National Prayer Breakfast, Feb. 2, 1984: “This power of prayer can be illustrated by the story that goes back to the fourth century – the monk (Telemachus) living in a little remote village, spending most of his time in prayer. … One day he thought he heard the voice of God telling him to go to Rome. … Weeks and weeks later, he arrived … at a time of a festival in Rome. … He followed a crowd into the Coliseum, and then, there in the midst of this great crowd, he saw the gladiators come forth, stand before the Emperor, and say, ‘We who are about to die salute you.’ And he realized they were going to fight to the death for the entertainment of the crowds. He cried out, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’ And his voice was lost in the tumult there in the great Colosseum. …”

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Reagan continued: “And as the games began, he made his way down through the crowd and climbed over the wall and dropped to the floor of the arena. Suddenly the crowds saw this scrawny little figure making his way out to the gladiators and saying, over and over again, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’ And they thought it was part of the entertainment, and at first they were amused. But then, when they realized it wasn’t, they grew belligerent and angry. …”

Reagan added: “And as he was pleading with the gladiators, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’ one of them plunged his sword into his body. And as he fell to the sand of the arena in death, his last words were, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’ And suddenly, a strange thing happened. The gladiators stood looking at this tiny form lying in the sand. A silence fell over the Colosseum. And then, someplace up in the upper tiers, an individual made his way to an exit and left, and the others began to follow. And in the dead silence, everyone left the Colosseum. That was the last battle to the death between gladiators in the Roman Colosseum. Never again did anyone kill or did men kill each other for the entertainment of the crowd. …”

Reagan ended: “One tiny voice that could hardly be heard above the tumult. ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’ It is something we could be saying to each other throughout the world today.”

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Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2017/04/ronald-reagan-told-us-what-we-need-to-say-today/#ypDyVKU954J3HML8.99

Historians Know the Biggest Cause Of Crime

I normally only publish my own thoughts, but occasionally I come across something really outstanding, this is one of those times.

The director of the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover, died May 2, 1972. For 48 years, under eight presidents, J. Edgar Hoover oversaw the Federal Bureau of Investigation, becoming famous for his dramatic campaigns to stop gangsters and organized crime.

Hoover established the use of fingerprints in law enforcement and successfully tracked down well-known criminals. FDR gave Hoover the task of investigating foreign espionage and left-wing activist groups.

J. Edgar Hoover stated: “The criminal is the product of spiritual starvation. Someone failed miserably to bring him to know God, love Him and serve Him.”

In 1981, Chuck Colson stated: “Imprisonment as a primary means of criminal punishment is a relatively modern concept. It was turned to as a humane alternative to the older patterns of harsh physical penalties for nearly all crimes. Quakers introduced the concept in Pennsylvania…”

Chuck Colson continued: “The first American prison was established in Philadelphia when the Walnut Street Jail was converted into a series of solitary cells where offenders were kept in solitary confinement. The theory was that they would become ‘penitents,’ confessing their crimes before God and thereby gaining a spiritual rehabilitation. Hence, the name ‘penitentiary’ – as a place for penitents.”

In the introduction to Edward L.R. Elson’s book, “America’s Spiritual Recovery,” 1954, J. Edgar Hoover wrote: “We can see all too clearly the devastating effects of Secularism on our Christian way of life. The period when it was smart to ‘debunk’ our traditions undermined … high standards of conduct. A rising emphasis on materialism caused a decline of ‘God-centered’ deeds and thoughts.”

J. Edgar Hoover continued: “The American home … ceased to be a school of moral and spiritual education. When spiritual guidance is at a low ebb, moral principles are in a state of deterioration. Secularism advances when men forget God.”

This is similar to Russian author Dostoevsky, who, in his book “The Brothers Karamazov,” had the character Ivan Karamazov contend that if there is no God, “everything is permitted.”

“Everything is permitted” is the amoral political strategy explained by Niccolo Machiavelli in his book, “The Prince,” 1515.

Five hundred years ago, Italy consisted of many independent city-states: Venice, Genoa, Naples, Florence, Sienna, Amalfi, Milan, Corsica, Pisa, San Marino, Cospaia, Gaeta, Lucca, Noli, Trani and Papal states. These were primarily noblemen’s republics, each with their own armies and navies, and they continually fought.

Machiavelli thought that if one prince could control all of Italy, it would stop the in-fighting. He observed the ruthless tactics of Cesare Borgia (1475-1507), who reputedly used intrigue, deceit, seduction, incest, poisoning and assassination to usurp power.

Machiavelli wrote that in politics, “one must consider the final result,” a phrase more succinctly remembered as “the end justifies the means,” an adage which dates back to Ovid’s Heroides, 10 B.C.

The “end” of one prince controlling all of Italy was such a good end that any “means” necessary to get there was justified. If the prince wanted to conquer a city, in his quest to unify Italy, the people would hate him. But if the prince paid criminals under the table to burn barns, kill cows, smash windows and set buildings on fire, thus creating crises and terror in the streets, the people of the city would cry out for help. The prince would come in, dispatch with the “useful idiot” criminals he paid, nobody would know the better for it, and the naive people, unaware of his subterfuge, would praise the prince as a hero.

It is good marketing, create the need and fill it: go around the back of a house and set it on fire, then go around to the front door and sell them a fire extinguisher – they will pay anything for it and thank you for being there.

Termed “Machiavellianism,” it the creating or capitalizing on crises to concentrate control, or as it is more popularly put, “never let a good crisis go to waste.”

H.L. Mencken wrote: “The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule.”

Notorious tactics recorded by Machiavelli include:

  • “Politics have no relation to morals.”
  • “A prince never lacks legitimate reasons to break his promise.”
  • “The promise given was a necessity of the past: the word broken is a necessity of the present.”
  • “A wise ruler ought never to keep faith when by doing so it would be against his interests.”

Machiavelli explained how people actually want to believe lies from their leaders:

  • “Men are so simple and so much inclined to obey immediate needs that a deceiver will never lack victims for his deceptions.”
  • “Men are so simple and yield so readily to the desires of the moment that he who will trick will always find another who will suffer to be tricked.”
  • “One who deceives will always find those who allow themselves to be deceived.”

Machiavelli gave his maleficent counsel:

  • “No enterprise is more likely to succeed than one concealed from the enemy until it is ripe for execution.”
  • “It is double pleasure to deceive the deceiver.”

Machiavelli promised “change”:

  • “I’m not interested in preserving the status quo; I want to overthrow it.”
  • “One change always leaves the way open for the establishment of others.”
  • “Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.”

Machiavelli continued his baleful remarks:

  • “It is much more secure to be feared than to be loved.”
  • “It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both.”
  • “Since it is difficult to join them together, it is safer to be feared than to be loved when one of the two must be lacking.”
  • “Men shrink less from offending one who inspires love than one who inspires fear.”
  • “If an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that his vengeance need not be feared.”
  • “Severities should be dealt out all at once, so that their suddenness may give less offense; benefits ought to be handed out drop by drop, so that they may be relished the more.”
  • “The new ruler must determine all the injuries that he will need to inflict. He must inflict them once and for all.”
  • “Men ought either to be indulged or utterly destroyed, for if you merely offend them they take vengeance, but if you injure them greatly they are unable to retaliate, so that the injury done to a man ought to be such that vengeance cannot be feared.”
  • “Men should be either treated generously or destroyed, because they take revenge for slight injuries –- for heavy ones they cannot.”
  • “Whoever conquers a free town and does not demolish it commits a great error and may expect to be ruined himself.”

What society will fall victim to Machiavelli’s stratagems? William Holmes McGuffey warned in his “Newly Revised Rhetorical Guide,” 1853: “If you can induce a community to doubt the … authenticity of the Scriptures. … whether there be an eternal state of retribution beyond the grave; or whether there exists any such being as God, you have broken down the barriers of moral virtue, and hoisted the flood-gates of immorality and crime.”

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Samuel Adams stated Jan. 17, 1794: “A virtuous education is calculated to reach … the heart, and to prevent crimes. … Such an education, which leads the youth beyond mere outside show, will impress their minds with a profound reverence of the Deity.”

Dr. Benjamin Rush, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, wrote in “Essays – Literary, Moral, and Philosophical”: “In contemplating the political institutions of the United States, I lament that we waste so much time and money in punishing crimes and take so little pains to prevent them. … We neglect the only means of establishing and perpetuating our republican forms of government, that is, the universal education of our youth in the principles of Christianity by the means of the Bible.”

Noah Webster wrote in his “History of the United States,” 1832: “All the miseries and evils which men suffer from vice, crime, ambition, injustice, oppression, slavery and war, proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible.”

U.S. Senator Theodore Frelinghuysen wrote: “The Bible … Seal up this one Volume and in a half century all these hopes would wither and these prospects perish forever. These sacred temples would crumble or become the receptacles of pollution and crime.”

President James Buchanan proclaimed a national day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer, Dec. 14, 1860: “In this the hour of our calamity and peril to whom shall we resort for relief but to the God of our fathers. His omnipotent arm only can save us from the awful effects of our own crimes.”
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2017/05/historians-know-the-biggest-cause-of-crime/#ycd8sWD0qC0GVymD.99

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome