Have we Accomplished Anything By Legalizing Abotion

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

When the government made abortion legal, it took away all the legal and moral ramifications.

As a result, there were more abortions than ever which created an atmosphere of irresponsibility, and it rapidly became a form of birth control, which resulted in a moral breakdown, especially among the young.

Before abortion was legal, people were humiliated and scorned for getting pregnant, as a result, if a teen became pregnant they normally got married or gave the child up for adoption. Many pregnant unmarried teenage girls left town until they gave birth to prevent the humiliation. Pregnant girls were forced to drop out of school.

Because of the social stigma, many thought twice before committing acts that would create an out of wedlock pregnancy. Even though it may have seemed cruel at the time, the positive effects were that it created humans who were able to stand up to life’s challenges by accepting responsibility for their actions and taught them to not blame others for what they, themselves had created. 

Now teen pregnancy is accepted and often encouraged.  but by making it acceptable the number of unwed mothers has skyrocketed and many more children are placed at risk, the number of children living in one parent families has skyrocketed, leaving many of them living in poverty.

As is most often the case, the government’s attempt to solve a problem by removing personal responsibility has backfired and more people are at risk and personal responsibility has all but been removed from the public scene.

Growing children need boundaries,  guidance, and to be taught there are consequences for their actions. When people are coddled and excuses made for their actions, it only creates an atmosphere where ethical standards are relaxed and soon people begin to make unwise choices without even thinking what the consequences may be, this can only lead to one result, and it isn’t the preferred choice.

Then we all sit back and wonder what happened.

Just another example of how liberalism doesn’t work, they try to cater to the so-called weak, and by doing so, they just create more weak and needy people. You cannot build people up by making life easy for them. The human soul needs challenge and adversity to evolve.

Besides the moral and ethical aspects of it by interfering with their karma you are taking away their life plan, that’s why the more you give someone, the angrier they get and they seem unappreciative and bitter, you are running their life and taking away their purpose. Doing just the opposite of what needs to be done.

The soul doesn’t want to be coddled, it needs to be challenged in order for it to fully evolve into its full potential. 

We need to stay out of their lives, let them make their own choices and only guide them on their path through life. 

How often do we, as a society need to relearn the same things over and over, sooner or later we will get it. 

photo of the Egyptian Sphinx at sunset

A journey into the unknown. Open new avenues in your spiritual journey

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, while studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America and the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has observed that many of the forgotten cultures had spiritual beliefs that were stronger than ours in modern times.

While we have advanced technically far superior to those that came before us, we have lagged behind in spiritual knowledge.

For us to advance as the human race, we need to combine the spiritual knowledge of those that came before us, not only that of the ancients but the knowledge of our direct ancestors as well, with the technical knowledge we have today for us to propel into the twenty-first century and beyond.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Keep Your Mind Sharp

 

 

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Life Is All About Seventeen Inches

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

I found this somewhere, it’s a good read.

In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention.While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”

Who the heck is John Scolinos, I wondered. Well, in 1996 Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948.  No matter, I was just happy to be there.

He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate.  Pointed side down.

Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

After speaking for twenty-five minutes, not once mentioning the prop hanging around his neck, Coach Scolinos appeared to notice the snickering among some of the coaches. Even those who knew Coach Scolinos had to wonder exactly where he was going with this, or if he had simply forgotten about home plate since he’d gotten on stage.

Then, finally …

“You’re probably all wondering why I’m wearing home plate around my neck. Or maybe you think I escaped from Camarillo State Hospital,” he said, his voice growing irascible. I laughed along with the others, acknowledging the possibility.

“No,” he continued, “I may be old, but I’m not crazy. The reason I stand before you today is to share with you baseball people what I’ve learned in my life, what I’ve learned about home plate in my 78 years.”

Several hands went up when Scolinos asked how many Little League coaches were in the room. “Do you know how wide home plate is in Little League?” After a pause, someone offered, “Seventeen inches,” more question than answer.

“That’s right,” he said. “How about in Babe Ruth? Any Babe Ruth coaches in the house?”

Another long pause.

“Seventeen inches?”came a guess from another reluctant coach.

“That’s right,” said Scolinos. “Now, how many high school coaches do we have in the room?” Hundreds of hands shot up, as the pattern began to appear. “How wide is home plate in high school baseball?”

“Seventeen inches,” they said, sounding more confident.

“You’re right!” Scolinos barked. “And you college coaches, how wide is home plate in college?”

“Seventeen inches!” we said, in unison.

“Any Minor League coaches here? How wide is home plate in pro ball?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“RIGHT! And in the Major Leagues, how wide home plate is in the Major Leagues?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“SEV-EN-TEEN INCHES!” he confirmed, his voice bellowing off the walls.

“And what do they do with a a Big League pitcher who can’t throw the ball over these seventeen inches?” Pause. “They send him to Pocatello!” he hollered, drawing raucous laughter.

“What they don’t do is this: they don’t say, ‘Ah, that’s okay, Bobby. You can’t hit a seventeen-inch target? We’ll make it eighteen inches, or nineteen inches. We’ll make it twenty inches so you have a better chance of throwing the ball over it.  If you can’t hit that, let us know so we can make it wider still, say twenty-five inches.’”

Pause.

“Coaches …”

Pause.

” … what do we do when our best player shows up late to practice? What do we do if he violates curfew? What if he uses drugs? Do we hold him accountable? Or do we change the rules to fit him? Do we widen home plate?

The chuckles gradually faded as four thousand coaches grew quiet, the fog lifting as the old coach’s message began to unfold.

Then he turned the plate toward himself and, using a Sharpie, began to draw something. When he turned it toward the crowd, point up, a house was revealed, complete with a freshly drawn door and two windows. “This is the problem in our homes today. With our marriages, with the way we parent our kids. With our discipline. We don’t teach accountability to our kids, and there is no consequence for failing to meet standards. We widen the plate!”

Pause. Then, to the point at the top of the house he added a small American flag.

“This is the problem in our schools today. The quality of our education is going downhill fast and teachers have been stripped of the tools they need to be successful….to educate and discipline our young people. We are allowing others to widen home plate! Where is that getting us?”

“And this is the problem in the Church, where powerful people in positions of authority have taken advantage of young children, only to have such an atrocity swept under the rug for years. Our church leaders are widening home plate!”

I was amazed. At a baseball convention where I expected to learn something about curveballs and bunting and how to run better practices, I had learned something far more valuable. From an old man with home plate strung around his neck, I had learned something about life, about myself, about my own weaknesses and about my responsibilities as a leader. I had to hold myself and others accountable to that which I knew to be right, lest our families, our faith, and our society continue down an undesirable path.

“If I am lucky,” Coach Scolinos concluded, “you will remember one thing from this old coach today. It is this: if we fail to hold ourselves to a higher standard, a standard of what we know to be right; if we fail to hold our spouses and our children to the same standards, if we are unwilling or unable to provide a consequence when they do not meet the standard; and if our schools and churches and our government fail to hold themselves accountable to those they serve, there is but one thing to look forward to …”

With that, he held home plate in front of his chest, turned it around, and revealed its dark black backside.

“… dark days ahead.”

Coach Scolinos died in 2009 at the age of 91, but not before touching the lives of hundreds of players and coaches, including mine. Meeting him at my first ABCA convention kept me returning year after year, looking for similar wisdom and inspiration from other coaches. He is the best clinic speaker the ABCA has ever known because he was so much more than a baseball coach.

His message was clear: “Coaches, keep your players — no matter how good they are — your own children, and most of all, keep yourself at seventeen inches.

Photography Prints

Live and Let Live: The Right Way To Live

Common Sense goes a long way in this world

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

Many on the left honestly believe that most conservatives are narrow minded and want everyone to live by their values. 

They think that just because those on the right have a stronger moral code than many on the left, that those on the right are hypocrites and want every one to walk the straight and narrow.

While this may be true in some instance, and while I think many would like every one to try and live a moral and upright life, most on the right know this isn’t going to be the case, none of us are perfect and it is unrealistic to believe any of us can live a life unblemished, but that doesn’t keep us from trying. Just because we fail occasionally doesn’t make us hypocrites, it makes us human.

Most people I know who are conservative are of the opinion that each person is responsible for his or her  actions, the choices he makes are his own, and it is none of our business what they think, feel or act, as long as it doesn’t affect my life or decisions. 

We have no business trying to control their thinking, from what I have seen controlling others actions and thoughts  is a trait of the left. 

If we don’t believe in something, or  think something isn’t the correct thing to do, we don’t do it, or don’t buy it, and in most cases we don’t try to take it away from someone else, that is their choice. 

Sure, we often state our opinions and beliefs, that is our right and obligation to do, we have freedom of speech.

The left also has the freedom to listen or not to listen and not try to control our thinking.

Many on the left can’t understand how we can oppose an ideal or action and not hate the person who expresses that particular opinion. 

It has nothing to do with the person, his race, religion, creed, sex, or any other physical attribute. It is only what he states as his belief, we have a perfect right to disagree, it has noting to do with being racists, a bigot,  or sexist, it is only because we disagree with his or her opinion, we would disagree regardless of their physical appearance.

I’m not sure why that is  so hard to understand. 

Read my book, The Wisdom of Our Ancestors to learn more of the values that make us what we are today.

What do you think?

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Right To Bear Arms

photo of the book Liberty's secrets

The secrets our founders knew

The debate continues to rage concerning to our right to bear arms.  I refer you to an excerpt written by  Bill Federer, well known columnist concerning this subject. 

As you can plainly see, there ins’t any doubt in the minds of our founders concerning our right to bear arms. 

On March 5, 1770, a mob formed in Boston to protest. In the confusion, British troops fired into the crowd, killing five, one of which was the African-American patriot, Crispus Attucks. This became known as the Boston Massacre. Paul Revere’s popular engraving of the Boston Massacre fanned flames of anti-British sentiment.

On the second anniversary of the Boston Massacre, 1772, the president of Massachusetts’ Colonial Congress, Joseph Warren, who would later send Paul Revere on his midnight ride, stated: “If you perform your part, you must have the strongest confidence that the same Almighty Being who protected your pious and venerable forefathers … will still be mindful of you. … May our land be a land of liberty … until the last shock of time shall bury the empires of the world in one common undistinguishable ruin!”

America was like ancient Israel in that every man was in the militia, armed, and ready at a moment’s notice to defend his community.

On the fourth anniversary of the Boston Massacre, 1774, John Hancock, who would be the first to sign the Declaration of Independence, stated: “Will not a well-disciplined militia afford you ample security against foreign foes? We want not courage; it is discipline alone in which we are exceeded by the most formidable troops that ever trod the earth. … A well-disciplined militia is a safe, an honorable guard to a community like this, whose inhabitants are by nature brave, and are laudably tenacious of that freedom in which they were born. From a well-regulated militia we have nothing to fear; their interest is the same with that of the state. When a country is invaded, the militia are ready to appear in its defense; they march into the field with that fortitude which a consciousness of the justice of their cause inspires. …

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Guns in America

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning


Growing up in the fifties and sixties, we had four of five shotguns and rifles in the corner of the kitchen, the ammunition was in the kitchen cabinet.

The kids knew better than to pick up one of those guns without permission from our parents.

We were lectured almost daily on the proper use of firearms.

I normally walked around with a couple of cap guns on my hip, if I even pointed one of those at something that moved, a dog or a cat for example, my mom was on my case and the guns was taken away until I learned the proper use of a firearm.

Many times there were guns in the cars at school, often times we went rabbit hunting on our way home from school, the thought never even crossed our minds to shoot someone,.

Of course we didn’t watch videos about how to kill our parents either.

We weren’t perfect, and we did get into trouble occasionally, but we knew what the boundaries were and for the most part, never crossed those boundaries, if we did, we were severely punished.

We were taught respect and there was such a thing as discipline, in the home and in school.

If you care to see what the problem with society is, it isn’t a weapon, those guns in our kitchen were there for over ten years and never killed anyone.

If you want to see where the problem lies, the next time you walk past a mirror, look into it.

The violence won’t stop until we once again return to instilling honor, respect, discipline and a life purpose into our kids. Government can’t do that, laws won’t, it is up to the individual.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

Art Prints

 

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Should We Play a Religious song At A Football Game?

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

Someone mentioned that during a college football game in Florida, on Veteran’s Day, the band played Amazing Grace and played “Taps”.

They thought it was inappropriate.

I remember, not too many years ago, something like that would have been not only appropriate but expected.

This just goes to show how far our once great country has declined., all in the name of political correctness.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Art Prints

Growing Up In Indiana: Entertainment on a Saturday Night

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Times were simple, it was an uncomplicated life back then.

Growing up in the 50s, we were the fortunate ones. Little did we know what lie ahead of those innocent times.Life was hard but good. Money wasn’t an issue, nobody had any.

Our entertainment was simple, we either went to see friends and ate popcorn, or we went shopping in a grocery store with two aisles and stopped at grandmas on the way home. Or we stayed home.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome