We Can Only Determine the Future By Discovering From Whence We Came.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

Many think we should never look back, when we do someone will immediately tell us we are living in the past. 

We can look back into our past for any number of reasons, and doing so doesn’t mean we are dwelling there, we are just recalling memories, often times these memories can have a positive result on our lives. 

Many times life’s puzzles can only be solved by looking into the past which enables us to find a reference as to where we are headed or which path we should take. 

We need to connect the dots, and the dots cannot be connected by looking forward, the dots are in the past. 

You need to trust the dots from the past will connect you to the dots in the future. 

photo of shriner walking up masonic stairs

The Masonic Influence on World History

By learning to trust in something, your gut, life, destiny, karma, whatever it is that connects you with the God Force, then you will once again be directed to the path you are destined to assume. 

Sometimes we need to look backward to see forward. 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, while studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America and the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has observed that many of the forgotten cultures had spiritual beliefs that were stronger than ours in modern times.

While we have advanced technically far superior to those that came before us, we have lagged behind in spiritual knowledge.

For us to advance as the human race, we need to combine the spiritual knowledge of those that came before us, not only that of the ancients but the knowledge of our direct ancestors as well, with the technical knowledge we have today for us to propel into the twenty-first century and beyond.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

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Where are the Parents?

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Written by Gary Wonning

Every year there are fund raisers to buy school supplies for children returning to school.

The schools say they can’t affort it while paying school board member $200,00 a year plus, but that is another story.

When at school, many of the kids are not only given free lunches and in many cases free breakfast, now some schools are also providing free dinners because they come from single parent or low income homes.

Where are the parents, I think we  all know.

Many had kids before they could afford them, many children  are being raised in single parent homes, and many are laying in the corner drunk or on drugs.

Personal responsibility has become a thing of the past. In many instances, people have become so accustomed to letting the government solve all their problems they no  longer even consider the fact they may have a part in governing their own lives.

It has become fashionable to play the part of the victim, by becoming a victim in as many areas as they can, they believe it increases their importance to society and dissolves any responsibility they may have, it’s always someone else’s fault.

By becoming a victim, they draw a lot of attention to themselves in the same way some people are always late to a meeting, they get a lot of attention by making a grand entrance after everyone else is already there.

Many adults grew up in environments where there was no guidance in how to conduct their life and garner positive attention by doing positive deeds.

Kids have grown up being coddled with their every need supplied by someone else and sheltered from life’s hardships.  As a result when they grow up they are left with no coping skills and unable to function as they should. In turn they raise their kids the same way they were raised, only  coddling them more then they were while growing up. 

Each generation continues to buy into the victim mentality until very few actually know anything about personal responsibility and becoming self reliant. 

Many have forgotten what  Our Ancestors taught us.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

If we don’t break the cycle, how many kids will there be needing support from government and society in the next generation?

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, while studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America and the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has observed that many of the forgotten cultures had spiritual beliefs that were stronger than ours in modern times.

While we have advanced technically far superior to those that came before us, we have lagged behind in spiritual knowledge.

For us to advance as the human race, we need to combine the spiritual knowledge of those that came before us, not only that of the ancients but the knowledge of our direct ancestors as well, with the technical knowledge we have today for us to propel into the twenty-first century and beyond.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

 

Helping kids Who Are Returning To School

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Every year there are good intentioned people sponsoring fund raisers to buy school supplies for under privileged kids returning to school. This is a noble cause and it will help many kids who would otherwise not have the opportunity to have the items they need to succeed in school.

However noble the cause, I look at the reason schools say they can’t afford to buy the items needed in the classroom to enable a proper education.

It seems that daily there are news stories about how teachers and students themselves have to supply the things the schools should be providing. Obviously, teachers shouldn’t be required to purchase these items either. In many parts of the country, teachers are underpaid, and not allowed to discipline their students when they misbehave, some have even gotten thrown out of the class room by unruly students and weren’t even able to defend themselves.

For most of us, our property taxes have risen substantially over the years due to inflation and rising property values, and the schools keep complaining they are always needing more money.

We have school board members making over $200,000 dollars  per year and the schools can’t afford to buy supplies for the children, something is wrong here and it isn’t that the schools don’t have enough money.

Public schools are a government program, and I haven’t seen a government program that doesn’t always need more money, and regardless of how much is allotted to them, they always spend it and always complain they need more.

As the old adage proclaims, ” The easiest task in the world is to spend other peoples money.”

The school system is proving that, there is no accountability, all they need to do is complain to the taxpayers, and the money flows in and surprisingly, the money winds up in the school administrations pockets instead of where it actually needs to go, big surprise.

Meanwhile the students and teachers are once again left holding an empty bag.

When someone works for the government, they are supposed to be a public servant. While I don’t advocate someone working for peanuts, they should not be getting rich off the taxpayers.

Our present school board consists of five members,  the president makes almost $200,000 dollars a year, with the other four making around $40,000. Being a school board member should be voluntary, or at least their salaries should be cut in half, with the president being reduced by at least $150,000. How many school supplies would this one reduction pay for?

I’m not even getting into how much the rest of the administration receives, plus the perks.

By creating this environment, not only are we driving up the costs to the taxpayers, but we are teaching our kids the wrong values.

Kids aren’t learning  to be independent and to make it on their own, the cornerstone of the American way of life. By receiving this presumed “free stuff” , they are being taught to depend on government and others for their daily needs, instead of learning to rely on themselves and finding ways to improvise to make life work, and then and only then to look to others for help through the rough times in life.

If kids learn coping skills, they are then better able to function in the real world, and not become unglued when faced with the first crisis of their adult life.This problem, as well as many others will never be solved by throwing more money at a bad idea. It isn’t a problem of not having enough money, the problem is the priorities are no longer what they should be. 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, while studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

.photo of ayres rock, "uluru" in central Australia

The life of the Australian Aborigine

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America and the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has observed that many of the forgotten cultures had spiritual beliefs that were stronger than ours in modern times.

While we have advanced technically far superior to those that came before us, we have lagged behind in spiritual knowledge.

For us to advance as the human race, we need to combine the spiritual knowledge of those that came before us, not only that of the ancients but the knowledge of our direct ancestors as well, with the technical knowledge we have today for us to propel into the twenty-first century and beyond.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Is It OK To Hunt and Kill an Animal?

 

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

In today’s world, many people often ask if it is ok to hunt and kill an animal. 

With all the political correctness today, many of the old values are being drawn into question, and there are many who want to throw out all the old values and traditions, just because they are old and time worn. 

While there are many things about our society that does need to be changed, we need to be careful what we discard, just because it is a new thought or idea, doesn’t mean it is a good idea. Many values from the past need to be preserved. 

As I grew older, I too wondered if killing an animal was the proper thing to do, or should we all become vegetarians and avoid meat altogether. 

In my earlier years, I grew up on a farm and lived in a farming community, I began hunting at a very early age, probably around ten, and would often bring rabbits home to eat. 

I never gave it much thought until all the scuttlebutt about eating animals began to circulate through the press. 

I thought about this and wondered but I never discussed it with anyone. 

As I was rediscovering my spirituality, I began to research other beliefs than the Christian religion I had grown up with. 

As I did I became involved in the metaphysical movement and thus was involved in some past live regressions and extraterrestrial encounters. 

One afternoon, while under hypnosis at Boynton Canyon Vortex in Sedona, one of my spirit guides gave me the following message,”It’s OK to hunt and kill an animal if you use it for food and clothing. That is part of their life mission, they are here to serve us. but if you kill them for sport and leave the meat to spoil and waste away, that is wrong.”

Sounds good to me, that makes sense. 

These spirit guides are as wise as a tree full of owls. 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Life Is All About Seventeen Inches

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

I found this somewhere, it’s a good read.

In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention.While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”

Who the heck is John Scolinos, I wondered. Well, in 1996 Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948.  No matter, I was just happy to be there.

He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate.  Pointed side down.

Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

After speaking for twenty-five minutes, not once mentioning the prop hanging around his neck, Coach Scolinos appeared to notice the snickering among some of the coaches. Even those who knew Coach Scolinos had to wonder exactly where he was going with this, or if he had simply forgotten about home plate since he’d gotten on stage.

Then, finally …

“You’re probably all wondering why I’m wearing home plate around my neck. Or maybe you think I escaped from Camarillo State Hospital,” he said, his voice growing irascible. I laughed along with the others, acknowledging the possibility.

“No,” he continued, “I may be old, but I’m not crazy. The reason I stand before you today is to share with you baseball people what I’ve learned in my life, what I’ve learned about home plate in my 78 years.”

Several hands went up when Scolinos asked how many Little League coaches were in the room. “Do you know how wide home plate is in Little League?” After a pause, someone offered, “Seventeen inches,” more question than answer.

“That’s right,” he said. “How about in Babe Ruth? Any Babe Ruth coaches in the house?”

Another long pause.

“Seventeen inches?”came a guess from another reluctant coach.

“That’s right,” said Scolinos. “Now, how many high school coaches do we have in the room?” Hundreds of hands shot up, as the pattern began to appear. “How wide is home plate in high school baseball?”

“Seventeen inches,” they said, sounding more confident.

“You’re right!” Scolinos barked. “And you college coaches, how wide is home plate in college?”

“Seventeen inches!” we said, in unison.

“Any Minor League coaches here? How wide is home plate in pro ball?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“RIGHT! And in the Major Leagues, how wide home plate is in the Major Leagues?”

“Seventeen inches!”

“SEV-EN-TEEN INCHES!” he confirmed, his voice bellowing off the walls.

“And what do they do with a a Big League pitcher who can’t throw the ball over these seventeen inches?” Pause. “They send him to Pocatello!” he hollered, drawing raucous laughter.

“What they don’t do is this: they don’t say, ‘Ah, that’s okay, Bobby. You can’t hit a seventeen-inch target? We’ll make it eighteen inches, or nineteen inches. We’ll make it twenty inches so you have a better chance of throwing the ball over it.  If you can’t hit that, let us know so we can make it wider still, say twenty-five inches.’”

Pause.

“Coaches …”

Pause.

” … what do we do when our best player shows up late to practice? What do we do if he violates curfew? What if he uses drugs? Do we hold him accountable? Or do we change the rules to fit him? Do we widen home plate?

The chuckles gradually faded as four thousand coaches grew quiet, the fog lifting as the old coach’s message began to unfold.

Then he turned the plate toward himself and, using a Sharpie, began to draw something. When he turned it toward the crowd, point up, a house was revealed, complete with a freshly drawn door and two windows. “This is the problem in our homes today. With our marriages, with the way we parent our kids. With our discipline. We don’t teach accountability to our kids, and there is no consequence for failing to meet standards. We widen the plate!”

Pause. Then, to the point at the top of the house he added a small American flag.

“This is the problem in our schools today. The quality of our education is going downhill fast and teachers have been stripped of the tools they need to be successful….to educate and discipline our young people. We are allowing others to widen home plate! Where is that getting us?”

“And this is the problem in the Church, where powerful people in positions of authority have taken advantage of young children, only to have such an atrocity swept under the rug for years. Our church leaders are widening home plate!”

I was amazed. At a baseball convention where I expected to learn something about curveballs and bunting and how to run better practices, I had learned something far more valuable. From an old man with home plate strung around his neck, I had learned something about life, about myself, about my own weaknesses and about my responsibilities as a leader. I had to hold myself and others accountable to that which I knew to be right, lest our families, our faith, and our society continue down an undesirable path.

“If I am lucky,” Coach Scolinos concluded, “you will remember one thing from this old coach today. It is this: if we fail to hold ourselves to a higher standard, a standard of what we know to be right; if we fail to hold our spouses and our children to the same standards, if we are unwilling or unable to provide a consequence when they do not meet the standard; and if our schools and churches and our government fail to hold themselves accountable to those they serve, there is but one thing to look forward to …”

With that, he held home plate in front of his chest, turned it around, and revealed its dark black backside.

“… dark days ahead.”

Coach Scolinos died in 2009 at the age of 91, but not before touching the lives of hundreds of players and coaches, including mine. Meeting him at my first ABCA convention kept me returning year after year, looking for similar wisdom and inspiration from other coaches. He is the best clinic speaker the ABCA has ever known because he was so much more than a baseball coach.

His message was clear: “Coaches, keep your players — no matter how good they are — your own children, and most of all, keep yourself at seventeen inches.

Photography Prints

The Christian View of Gay Marriage

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by Gary Wonning

Many are confused as to what a Christian’s view of gay marriage should be. 

It’s as plain as humps on a camel.

Photography Prints

Regardless of whether you accept gay marriage as a legitimate marriage or you feel it is wrong, as a christian, you are taught to be tolerant of others and their opinions. 

A christian wold be tolerant, it’s none of anyone’s business what your  preferences are, it’s none of anyone else’s business how you feel about something or what your opinions are.

What each soul does or doesn’t do is their own choosing, they are the ones who have to deal with their karma. It really is none of your business how they live, unless their decisions affect your life. 

Also, it is none of their business what your opinions are, we each have a right to think, feel, and act in America., as long as we harm no one else. 

We each have free will, that is what America is all about.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Three Boxes of Freedom

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Written by Gary Wonning

Our freedom is the result of a five thousand year march through history. From the earliest times, man has held a desire to be free from tyranny. 

It took thousands of years for civilization to reach the level where they were able to govern themselves. 

Freedom isn’t for the weak of heart or uninformed. Today our freedom is guaranteed and preserved by the three boxes of freedom. 

The ballot box enables us to vote for our representatives in government , we must remember, they are representatives, they are not our leaders. 

The jury box enables each citizen to hand out justice to those who wrong others.

The cartilage box enables us to defend freedom where ever it is needed, both internationally and domestically. 

Art Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome