Why Did Columbus Sail To the Caribbean?

Written By: Gary Wonning

Christopher Columbus was known to be a Knights Templar, his ships carried the Cross of Jerusalem, the symbol the knights  Templars displayed on their flag. 

It is now being discovered the Templars, Vikings, Norse and probably others had reached North America before Columbus did.

There is evidence of buried treasure on Oak Island off the coast of Nova Scotia, possibly treasure the Knights buried after fleeing France because of the persecution of the church.  Evidence has been found of Templar activity in the upper Midwest of the United States and Canada as well.

Columbus was a seafaring man, he would have known of these journeys that had been taken by others, especially those of the Templars.

When the Templars mingled with the native American Indians, they discovered both had similar rituals they performed during their many ceremonies. 

The Templars and the Indians intermarried, one reason, so they could preserve the blood line of David, of which Jesus and Mary were part of. 

You can easily assume there to be some bad blood between the Templars and the church due to recent events that had taken place in France. The Templars would have had no love for the church and the church wanted to exterminate the Templars because of the tremendous wealth they had created, and their philosophies differed immensely from those of the church.

Did he understand the consequences of the church intermingling with the natives and how the beliefs of the natives would eventually be destroyed because the philosophy of the church was entirely different than that of the Templars or the natives.?

It is possible he sailed south to avoid the mainland and preserve, not only the Templar way of life, but that of the natives as well.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Jamaica

Ocho Rios Jamaica

Ocho Rios

Little park in Ocho Rios

Jamaica, a Caribbean island nation, has a lush topography of mountains, rainforests, and reef-lined beaches. Many of its all-inclusive resorts are clustered in vibrant Montego Bay, with its British colonial architecture, and Negril, renowned for diving and snorkelling. Jamaica is famed as the birthplace of reggae, and its capital Kingston is home to the Bob Marley Museum, dedicated to it’s most famous son.

photo of a hemp store in Jamaica

Hemp store in Ocho Rios

Long legalized in Jamaica, hemp stores are seen almost everywhere.

photo of Island Village in Ocho Rios Jamaica

Island Village in Ocho Rios

Inhabited by the indigenous Arawak and Taino peoples, the island came under Spanish rule  following the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1494. Many of the indigenous people died of disease, and the Spanish imported African slaves as laborers. NamedSantiago, it remained a possession of Spain until 1655, when England  conquered the island and renamed it Jamaica. Under British colonial rule, Jamaica became a leading sugar exporter, with its plantation economy highly dependent on slaves imported from Africa.

 

photo of island village sign in ocho rios

Margaritaville in Jamaica

With 2.8 million people, Jamaica is the third-most populous country in the Americas (after the United States and Canada), and the fourth-most populous country in the Caribbean. Kingston is the country’s capital and largest city, with a population of 937,700. Jamaicans are of predominately African descent, with significant European, Chinese, Indian, and mixed-race minorities.

photo of shoppers buying native gifts in Ocho Rios

Island shopping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In today’s world, sugar cane and tourism are two of the largest industries on the island.

YOUR GO TO ONLINE JAMAICA STORE

The blogger has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Cayman Spirits Co. Grand Cayman

They began with   just a couple of friends with an idea for recreating authentic, ocean-aged rum. They have come a long way since then, with a talented team, an expanded distilling facility, and a broad range of spirits to share, they have expanded a small business into a growing international company.

photo of Cayman Spirits

Cayman Spirits, the only distillery in Grand Cayman

Cayman Spirits began handcrafting small-batch spirits in 2008 on the Georgetown waterfront. With only a single column still, they did everything by hand, using local ingredients, traditional West Indies distilling techniques, and a tireless eye for detail.

And they still do to this day. But for them, making outstanding spirits means going beyond tradition, and making improvements along the path to perfection. With adventurous ideas and careful nuance, they recaptured authentic ocean-maturation with our award-winning Seven Fathoms Rum.

photo of Cayman Spirits still

Cayman Spirits still

Using a still manufactured in Kentucky, which they believe is the best place in the world to find a quality still, they continue to grow and create a world class rum.

 

photo of the cayman spirits distillary

The Cayman Spirits Distillery

The rum is aged in a secret location, seven fathoms under water in seasoned kegs to give it an unparalleled flavor. 

photo of the cayman Spirits distillary

Cayman Spirits Distillery

 

photo of Cayman Spirits first still

Cayman Spirits first still

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of a glass of whiskey over a lavendar background

Why do so many abuse drugs and alcohol?

Available in Kindle and many other Ebook formats

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cozumel Mexico

Cozumel Mexico, locate off the coast of Belize in Central America is a beautiful and historic island, rich in Mayan history. Once, it was the island where Mayan women went to practice fertility rites. Mayan temples still adorn this tiny paradise island.

photo of the town of Cozumel

Cozumel Mexico

Tiny native stores at one time adorned the streets of the village, those have now been replaced with modern shopping centers, not unlike the United States. Some of the uniqueness of the island has been lost.

photo of teh Cozumel beach

The beach at Cozumel

Playa Mia Resort, located just north of the town offers a day of relaxing from the rigors of cruise life. Jet skiing, sailboating, parasailing, and snorkeling are just a few of the amenities available. If none of that appeals to you, relaxing and eating are also available.

photo  of the sign at Playa Mia

Playa Mia Resort in Cozumel

A tour bus leaves Playa Mia, escorting its passengers back to their cruise ship

photo of a small man and a big hat

Treasures in hand , it’s back to the ship

photo of a Mayan Pyramid

An interesting photo book about the Maya Indians of central America

 

Nassau Bahamas

If you are going on a Caribbean cruise, chances are you will be stopping at Nassau in the Bahamas. Located only ninety miles off the coast of Florida, it is a convenient first or last stop on most Caribbean cruises.

photo of two cruise ships docked in Nassau Bahamas

Cruise ships docked in Nassau

Noted for it’s famous Straw Market, restaurants, and great beaches, Nassau is a favorite destination for everyone.

 

 

photo of the Atlantis resort

One of the most popular destinations in Nassau is the famed Atlantis resort located on Paradise Island, just a short cab ride from your cruise ship.

photo of a narrow alley in Nassau

A narrow street in Nassau

Hidden away in secluded alleys many treasures are waiting to be discovered.

phot of the bar in Senor Frogs

the bar in Senor Frogs

After a hard day shopping, a stop at Senor Frogs for a sandwich and delightful drink awaits before returning to the ship.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of young living oils

Improve your health through essential oils and Isagenix.

photo of a Mayan Pyramid

An interesting photo book about the Maya Indians of central America

An online store with everything Caribbean

Harvesting Cinnamon in Grenada

Sell Art Online

While on a recent cruise I had the opportunity to visit the tiny Caribbean Island of Grenada which among other things is a reliable source of many spices, including cinnamon.

cinnamon Greneda plantation

Cinnamon has a rich history dating back 5,000 years when Arabs controlled the spice trade bringing cinnamon from what was known then as the Spice Islands, to sell in Nineveh, Babylon, Egypt and Rome. It was used by the Egyptians as an ingredient in their embalming fluids and the Romans used it as a love potion. Even Moses used it in a holy oil to anoint the ark of the covenant.

Harvesting cinnamon is very labor intensive, taking up to three years after a tree is planted before the first harvest can be completed.Harvesting is a long process, it begins  by growing the tree for two years and then coppicing it. Coppicing is a process whereby the tree is cut off at the ground level and shoots are allowed to grow from the main branch.

At harvest time the shoots are cut and the leaves and twigs are removed with the rough outer bark. The shoots are then beaten to soften the tissues of the inner bark and make it easier to peel away in a complete strip. Once peeled, the bark is placed in overlapping, extended layers then rolled to form long canes or quills that are sun-dried. As the quills dry, the bark curls and becomes paper-like. These long canes are later cut into cinnamon sticks. Flakes left over from this process, called  featherings are sold to make into ground cinnamon powder or to be distilled into cinnamon oil. Cinnamon trees can yield productive bark for about 45 years, after which they are replaced with a new seedling.

 

Today much of North America’s cinnamon comes from Southeast Asia and the closely related cassia tree. Cassia is considered slightly inferior in taste to zeylanicum or true cinnamon that is a softer color with a milder, sweeter flavor. Cassia cinnamon is normally a darker reddish brown color and has a stronger, somewhat bittersweet flavor. Cassia cinnamon is also less expensive than zeylanicum cinnamon. Most cinnamon in the United States does not state its origin.

Cinnamon with its woody, mild yet exotic flavor is arguably the most popular spice in the world. Aside from its many uses in baking and cooking, it also provides a wonderful aroma to freshen the house. Just boil 5 cups of water with a teaspoon of added cinnamon, then let it simmer on the stove to enjoy the smell of a spice that has intoxicated people for over five millennia!

 Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature, landscapes and studying native cultures. Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt, the Canary Islands, much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hardcover and Ebooks, and contact information: please check his website, http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments appreciated

money photography

This informative Ebook describes alternative methods of making money ,often a full time income in photography even if you have no desire to shoot wedding photography. this book gives examples and websites where you can use your photos to supply you with an income, not only to enable you to buy new equipment, but a living income.

 

 

The Bahamas: Great Stirrup Cay

Photography Prints

Great Stirrup Cay is a small island that is part of the Berry Islands in the Bahamas.  Norwegian Cruise Line purchased the island from the Belcher Oil Company in 1977 and developed it into a private island for their cruise ship passengers. The northern part of the island has a sandy beach surrounded by rocks with snorkeling areas. The southern part features a helicopter airfield (with a sign reading “Great Stirrup Cay International Airport”), a large area without vegetation, and numerous concrete blocks. These are all remnants of a previous U.S. military installation and satellite tracking station. The island’s lighthouse was originally constructed in 1863 by the Imperial Light House Service

DSC_0374_edited-1 DSC_0376_edited-1 DSC_0383_edited-1 DSC_0385_edited-1 DSC_0386_edited-1 DSC_0387_edited-1 DSC_0397

 

Great Stirrup Cay, along with the rest of the Bahamas, was formed by tectonic and glacial shifting. The first known settlers to the Bahamas were the Lucayan Indians, relatives of the Arawaks  who populated the Caribbean around 600 A.D.

Great Stirrup was a pirate hideout while the British settled in Nassau and the larger islands until 1815. This time marks the first documented settlers of Great Stirrup, and many of the structures from this settlement still stand today. Charts of this era show simply “Stirrup’s Cay”.

“Stirrup’s Cay” remained active during the American Civil war, as the Confederates wished to continue to export cotton to Europe. The island was used as a landfall for provisioning while Federal warships patrolled the area to thwart their efforts. After the abolition of slavery, the British began to slowly withdraw from the out island colonies, and the plantation at Great Stirrup was abandoned. Great Stirrup is the northern most island in a chain of islands known as the Berry Islands, and is situated in an area along the Northwest Providence Channel. In 1863, the Imperial Lighthouse Service erected the lighthouse on Great Stirrup Cay. The lighthouse site was manned for many years, but it is now timed and solar powered, making it self-sufficient. The structure stands nearly 80 feet, and its light is visible for over 20 miles.

During  World War ll,the United States, in an effort to protect its eastern shores, came to the Bahamas and Great Stirrup with a wide array of observational and defensive equipment. Among these were submersible cables, which were run along the ocean floor to listen for enemy submarines. Two “cable houses” still stand on the southeastern shore of the island, also overgrown by jungle. The  United States Air force later constructed a satellite tracking station. This facility was later leased to Motorola and other private sector companies. New technology has made the station obsolete, and it was closed in 1991.

Belcher Oil Company of Miami staked claim to the north section of the island for many years. Their interests there included real estate speculation, oil exploration, and a possible site for a corporate retreat. In 1977, Norwegian Caribbean Lines (later Norwegian Cruise Line) acquired this section from Belcher Oil.

 Gary has been a writer/ photographer for over 20 years, specializing in nature,landscapes and studying native cultures.Besides visiting most of the United States, he has traveled to such places as Egypt,the Canary Islands,much of the Caribbean. He has studied  the Mayan Cultures in Central America, and the Australian Aboriginal way of life.Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in many different parts of the world!

He has published several books about the various cultures he has observed.

For more information and a link to his hard cover and Ebooks,and contact information: please check his website, http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments appreciated

money photography

This informative Ebook describes alternative methods of making money ,often a full time income in photography even if you have no desire to shoot wedding photography. this book gives examples and websites where you can use your photos to supply you with an income, not only to enable you to buy new equipment, but a living income as well.