Aboriginal Culture: Raising the Young

 

In the past only healthy babies were kept, they were suckled for seven years and if the mother couldn’t keep up with work and the child, the baby was killed. Most tribes contained 20- 30 people, with 4-5 in each family. Some lived to be 100 years old and some had more than one wife. If a husband passed away, many times the wife and family would be supported by another male.

It took about six acres of land to support one person, they survived by eating whatever was available, including termites, ants, and grub worms.

We even had the chance to eat a grub worm, it was prepared in the usual fashion, roasted in an open pit fire, it wasn’t too bad, tasted like chicken.

If the tribe became too large and there wasn’t enough food, the weaker ones were either killed or left to die.

In the dry years, women would not ovulate. They would have zero population growth. Sometimes the droughts would last 10 years, and there would be no children born during that time. The lack of food and environmental stress ruined the sex drive.

When a woman first felt the kick of her child, the first animal they saw was believed to be its totem or spirit animal, that is the closest source of energy. It could be a snake, kangaroo or anything.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

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Nature Is Sacred

The aborigines of Australia believe:

All nature is sacred, but in creation place, spirit power manifests more readily, these are places where great events of creation took place. Members of a group share a common totem, and each individual has a totem.

There is no better learning than life learning, knowledge is not important it’s how you feel about it.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Aborigine Beliefs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The aborigines believe that when we visit a place we leave an image, and a person trained to see that image can follow some one regardless of the terrain or how long they have been gone. Their teachings show many examples of such happenings, as well as casting spells on someone thousands of miles away, the victim affected by it even though he has no conscious knowledge of the spell being cast.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Being An Aborigine

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia, an interesting culture

 

Many areas of the Aboriginal way of life is misunderstood.

Being an aborigine is a way of life or religion, more than a race, anyone can adapt the ways of the aborigine and become an aborigine.

The true aborigine is Caucasian. when some of them took their shirt off, their chests were white. They are dark because they have lived in the sun for thousands of years.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Sydney Harbor, One of the Most Beautiful Harbors in the World

 

Sydney Harbor is one of the most beautiful harbors in the world. The flight path takes the plane over the cliffs in Sydney Harbor.  As I observed the Opera House and Sydney Bridge from my window seat, the plane began its descent into Sydney airport. the adventure was about to begin.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.
His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.
He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.
He has published several books about his adventures.
For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.
Your comments are welcome

The 4th of July in the Out Back of Australia

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

Written By: Gary Wonning

We rolled in about 2:00 pm on the 4th of July, and they were celebrating. We asked them why they were celebrating an American holiday? Their reply was they were grateful for what the Yanks did for them during WW 2. The U.S. had troops there and protected them from the Japanese, plus the Aussies are always looking for a reason to party.

Photography Prints

 

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of the Egyptian sphinz

A new era approaches

The Flight to Oz

 

Written By: Gary Wonning

The next month would be quite an adventure, and I was looking forward to it. This was all very exciting. After a five hour layover, one more flight and we would reach our first destination, Cairns, Queensland.

I discovered that wearing the ring in Australia had become easier for me, it very seldom fell off my finger and I wore it almost constantly. I began to think I would be able to wear it permanently when I returned home because I sensed my energies were changing.

I normally have an excellent sense of direction, so as our flight departed for Cairns, I became concerned. I had the distinct feeling we were headed south, the wrong direction. Did I get on the wrong flight?

Asking my seatmate, he reaffirmed we were indeed headed for Brisbane, our next stop, it eased my mind some, but why do I sense we are going south when we are actually going north? This problem continued all the while I was down under, after a while, I determined it must have something to do with the magnetic poles. Just as the water in a bathtub circulates in a different direction than in the northern hemisphere, so it must be with my sense of direction.

photo of Mount Connor

Mount Connor, a monolith in the middle of Australia

Aboriginal boys doing native dance

An interesting side note, the flight to Cairns was grossly overbooked, as a result, and unaware to those of us going on to Cairns, we were put on a second plane to Brisbane, occupying the same seats we would have on the flight from Brisbane to Cairns.

My seat mate had mentioned we were flying to Brisbane, but that comment never sank in until we began our descent into Brisbane. I looked around to some of my travel companions seated behind me, they also had a quizzical look on their faces, it was supposed to be a direct flight to Cairns.

Totally confused, we were escorted to the very next gate at the Brisbane airport, boarded the aircraft and sat in the exact same seats we had on the previous plane. This is way too much thinking for me, after crossing 15 time zones and having had little sleep, I don’t want to deal with it, Just get me to my room.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome