You Know You’re a Redneck When:

 

You Know You’re a Redneck When…(Part 3)

Your lifetime goal is to own a fireworks stand..

You sit on your roof at Christmas time hoping to fill your deer quota..

You have a complete set of salad bowls and they all say Cool Whip on the side..

The biggest city you’ve ever been to is Walmart..

Your working TV sits on top of your non-working TV..

You thought the Unibomber was a wrestler..

You’ve used your ironing board as a buffet table..

You think a quarter horse is that ride in front of K-Mart..

Your neighbors think you’re a detective because a cop always brings you home..

A tornado hits your neighborhood and does a $100,000 worth of improvement..

You’ve used a toilet brush as a back scratcher..

You missed 5th grade graduation because you had jury duty..

You think fast food is hitting a deer at 65 mph..

Somebody tells you that you’ve got something in your teeth and you take them out to see what it is.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

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Australian Aboriginal Spiritual Beliefs

Written by Gary Wonning

Rock art can be like a  map, one drawing leads to the next. 

Most of them don’t know how old they are, there are no records, they can only guess.  

Women can be leaders but men are normally the leaders, it’s through blood. If there is no one in  the bloodline, the next best takes over.

Suicide is a  disgrace, they never saw a burden in life and they could die when they wanted. They chose the spiritual way when depressed, they talk to themselves if no mates are nearby. 

They believe there is no  better learning than life learning, the  knowledge is not important it’s how you feel about it.

There are about twelve hundred tribes,  and there are tribes no one knows about.  Even today, not all of Australia has been explored. Some of the tribes still live underground.

There is a time and place for everything.

If we would be more trusting in spirit, everything would be provided.

The Aborigines would swim in the water with crocodiles, they would only take people who had done something wrong. They still swim with the crocodiles and believe the only time you get sick of a disease is if you did something wrong.

The living and dead are a link between the present culture and its mythic logical origin. Older paintings were said to have been done by spirits from the dream-time.

Mime spirits are Extraterrestrials.

Many are are still proud won’t rummage through garbage or paint graffiti on restroom.

Sacred Site is a place where aborigines find a manifestation of divine power, a sense of contact with creative form

All nature is sacred, but in creation place spirit power manifests more readily .

These are place where great events of creation took place.

Members of a group share common totem, each individual has totem.

A totem is the first animal a mother sees after the first kick of the unborn child. 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, while studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America and the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has observed that many of the forgotten cultures had spiritual beliefs that were stronger than ours in modern times.

While we have advanced technically far superior to those that came before us, we have lagged behind in spiritual knowledge.

For us to advance as the human race, we need to combine the spiritual knowledge of those that came before us, not only that of the ancients but the knowledge of our direct ancestors as well, with the technical knowledge we have today for us to propel into the twenty-first century and beyond.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

 

The Old Henry J, Growing Up In the Fifties

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

My grandparents had given me a nineteen fifty-two Henry J for my first car, I was only fifteen so I couldn’t legally drive it on the road, but I kept that car spotless. This was in the early sixties, our lives revolved around hot good looking cars. Very seldom did a week go by when I didn’t wash it or clean it up to keep it looking nice.

In all reality, it wasn’t much of a car, but it ran and had a radio, what else did I need?

I was the only one in my group of friends that had a car, so I was top dog.

Soon, Jim  and I would be making weekly trips to Batesville in my juke box on wheels, in search of adventure, and whatever else we could find.

I started to have trouble with it, minor things; the doors wouldn’t stay closed, radiator problems and such.

One Saturday evening, we had decided the proper action would be to circle the Gibson Theater in Batesville and wait for the show to end. We reasoned that girls would come swarming out of the theater and that would be our chance to meet a couple of them. (Teenage logic.)

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

Sell Art Online

 

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

The School Consolidation

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

The inevitable finally came to pass, there had been talk all the while  I was in school of consolidating with our arch enemies, Osgood.

Napoleon and Osgood were both small schools and as such our academic resources were limited.

Rumors of consolidation surfaced for many years and neither side wanted to give in, each wanted the school in their town and bragging rights that went with it, and because they were our fierce enemies on the basketball court, there wasn’t anyone on either side willing to give an inch.

Finally, Osgood won out only because water was available there and not in Napoleon.

The new school was soon built on the edge of Osgood, and many advantages came of it, not only on the basketball court but in academics as well.

Some minor animosity exists even today, minor grumblings are still heard at every class reunion.

Art Prints

 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

A New Life

Art Prints

 

Written by Gary Wonning

Finally, one morning, I fed the last of what feed I had to the cattle and I had no idea what I was going to feed them that night. I didn’t say anything to dad, because I knew he was broke, and I didn’t want to worry him. I was hoping for a miracle.

Driving in the driveway after school I sensed an unusual calm. I hardly noticed, but there were no cattle near the barn, I assumed they were still out in the barren pasture. 

I walked into the house, dad met me at the door and said,”You don’t have to milk tonight, I sold the cows.”

Shocked, I replied,”That’s good, I don’t have anything to feed them anyway.”

He looked at me kind of weird and never said anything. 

Just like that, my farming days drew to a close.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Life on the Farm: Feeding The Cattle

Photography Prints

Written by Gary Wonning

As the next summer approached, it was obvious the whole family had enough of farming. As soon as his back healed, dad was planning on getting a job at the local factory. It wasn’t something he wanted to do, but it was out of necessity.

He never really said anything, but I know deep down inside, he would have much sooner been on the farm than working in a sweaty old factory.

The summer wore on, our pasture was getting shorter and shorter, and the dry summer days didn’t help provide food for our cattle. Each time I went into town to buy feed, the money became scarcer. Providing food for the cattle was becoming a real concern.

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Dad is Disabled For a Year: Growing up in Indiana in the 50s

Art Prints

 

Written by Gary Wonning

One day, while carrying the milk cans, dad slipped on some mud. As a result, he injured his back and he became bedfast for a year.

Suddenly the task of doing all the farming fell on my shoulders. This included putting out the crops, cultivating, putting up the hay, harvesting them and milking thirty head of cattle morning and night, as well as getting feed for them from the feed mill.

There wasn’t much choice but to jump in and do it. I didn’t mind too much, my parents needed help and I considered it a challenge to see if I could do it. All things considered, everything went as well as could be expected. I somehow managed to get the work done, have a social life, and lead the life a normal sixteen year old would and should have.

At times it was a struggle making it all work, but all in all I learned a lot and enjoyed the challenge. Actually we had too many cattle for the acreage we had. With over thirty head of cattle on sixty-five acres of farmland, it was hard to raise enough food for them, as time went on, we found ourselves buying more and more feed for them. This cut into the profits more and more, every day and we struggled to make ends meet.

The rest of the story!

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome