We Tried To Make The World A Better Place

We tried so hard to make things better for our kids that we made them worse.  For my grandchildren, I’d like better.  I’d really like for them to know about hand-me-down clothes and homemade ice cream and leftover meat loaf sandwiches.  I really would.

I hope you learn humility by being humiliated, and that you learn honesty by being cheated.  I hope you learn to make your own bed and mow the lawn and wash the car.  And I really hope nobody gives you a brand-new car when you are sixteen.

It will be good if at least one time you can see puppies born and your old dog put to sleep.  I hope you get a black eye fighting for something you believe in.  I hope you have to share a bedroom with your younger brother.  And it’s all right if you have to draw a line down the middle of the room, but when he wants to crawl under the covers with you because he’s scared, I hope you let him.

When you want to see a movie and your little brother wants to tag along, I hope you’ll let him.  I hope you have to walk uphill to school with your friends and that you live in a town where you can do it safely.  On rainy days when you have to catch a ride, I hope you don’t ask your driver to drop you two blocks away so you won’t be seen riding with someone as uncool as your mom.

If you want a slingshot, I hope your dad teaches you how to make one instead of buying one.  I hope you learn to dig in the dirt and read books.

When you learn to use computers, I hope you also learn to add and subtract in your head.  I hope you get teased by your friends when you have your first crush on a girl, and when you talk back to your mother that you learn what ivory soap tastes like.

May you skin your knee climbing a mountain, burn you hand on a stove and stick your tongue on a frozen flagpole.  I don’t care if you try a beer once, but I hope you don’t like it.  And if a friend offers you dope or a joint, I hope you realize he is not your friend.

I sure hope you make time to sit on a porch with your Grandpa and go fishing with your Uncle.  May you feel sorrow at a funeral and joy during the holidays.  I hope your mother punishes you when you throw a baseball through your neighbor’s window and that she hugs you and kisses you at Christmas time when you give her a plaster mold of your hand.

These things I wish for you–tough times and disappointment, hard work and happiness.  To me, it’s the only way to appreciate life.

Paul Harvey. . . GOOD DAY!

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Raising Turkeys

Written By: Gary Wonning

After we started raising turkeys, the manure which is rich in nitrogen and smells of ammonia, greatly enhanced the soil. As a result, the corn yield increased to around a hundred bushels per acre. That was quite an improvement from the early years.

The young chick turkeys were housed inside until they were about four months old. The houses they were living in were equipped with wire flooring so the droppings could fall below where they were walking. This made for a very slippery surface and resulted in some interesting situations when it was time to catch them and put them out on range.

The turkeys were caught individually, so there was much slipping and sliding while performing this function. When I got a little older, I was allowed to help, which I thought was big stuff, until one night as I lunged for a turkey, I slipped and only grabbed one of the turkey’s legs. The other leg swung around and the turkey claws made a large gash across my right cheek.

It healed after a time, but for years, every time I exercised a lot and my face became red, the scar would be visible.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Power Of Positive Thinking

Written By: Gary Wonning

The  Power Of Positive Thinking, Before the Power Of Positive Thinking Was Popular.

I have always been a high school basketball fan, growing up in Indiana, it was only natural.

To add to the allure, The movie “Hoosiers”, was filmed about my neighboring school championship season, the Milan Indians.

I was nine years old when the game was played and it left a permanent impression in our minds, after that game everyone wanted to be Bobby Plump, who was portrayed as Jimmy Chitwood in the movie. 

I knew of or personally knew many of the players and through the years continuously learned more about the team and what inspired them.

I recently discovered something I hadn’t known.

Glenn Butte, the starting center was a high school principal in my hometown and I knew him quite well.

However, we constantly learn something new every day.

I recently read where he was giving a talk to some elementary school kids and he made the statement that the team actually believed they could win every game they played in, even the ones they lost.

They only lost a couple all season.

This game took place in 1954, well ahead of the time when positive thinking was popular.

These were farm kids and probably heard at different times that they could do anything they wanted, but at that time this wasn’t a popular notion.

Because of what this team accomplished, it inspired many to further their education in this tiny farm community, something that hadn’t been done before this.

We all hear that quote from time to time, but for it to really sink in, it has to come from deep down within our own soul, it’s something that can’t be taught. 

It just proves that we can accomplish anything if we put our heart into it and really believe it.

It shows how a small group of people in a small town can influence others and change the world.

We don’t all have to stand on a pulpit and talk to thousands at one time.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of young living oils

Improve your health through essential oils and Isagenix.

 

 

The Baby Boomers

Written By: Gary Wonning

Little did we know, the negative elements of society that were emerging would someday lead to the possible downfall of our country.

The baby boomer era ended in 1964, those born after that date were from a different time.

And with the passing of 1964, the world began to change. The age of innocence transformed into a time of rebellion, drugs, and discontent. People didn’t realize how good they had it.

The world had opened up endless possibilities and most ignored it and began to only look at what was wrong with the world and what was in it for them.

With the prosperity that followed, we began to forget where we came from, and what had made us a great nation. In retrospect, we were victims of our own success.

Return with me to the days of yesteryear. Discover how it was, why our values disappeared and maybe learn what we can do about it.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

Wrapping Christmas Presents: those Were The Days

Written by: Gary Wonning

The following is an excerpt from my book, Those were the Days

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Grandpa would wrap gifts such as a packet of chewing gum, using newspaper, tape, wire, glue, etc, until that packet of chewing gum was as big as or bigger than a basketball. It was pretty cool as a kid, there were a lot of gifts to unwrap, it took most of the afternoon, and when we were done, we didn’t really have much as far as cost was concerned, but we had a lot of stuff. We never realized the gifts weren’t expensive, just that there were a lot of them.

It seems he got better and better every year and the wrapping became more and more involved. Finally my brother and he got into a contest to see who could wrap the hardest gift to unwrap. I think my brother Paul finally got the last laugh, he nailed together a box with inch boards, wired it shut and taped it.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Christmas Shopping

Written By: Gary Wonning

In those days, living in the country as we did, there were no large department stores nearby. I don’t remember ever being in a large store until I was in my teens.

Therefore, our Christmas shopping was out of a Sears and Roebuck catalog. I couldn’t wait until the Christmas catalog arrived in mid-October and would anxiously shuffle through it to find things Santa could bring. Of course, I was always threatened, if I misbehaved, Santa would bring a lump of coal, It seemed there was always someone we knew would get lumps of coal on Christmas morning instead of presents.

Relive live life in the fifties

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of the Pilons

The Pilons, historic landmark in St. Lucia

The First Four Years Of School

Written By: Gary Wonning

The first four years of school, I had a bus driver who couldn’t keep any order. The bus ride became a real adventure, I was one of the youngest and not having any siblings to help me out, I became quite masterful at the art of diplomacy and became adept at staying unnoticed as to not invite the wrath of upper-class boys and girls who were bent on creating a disturbance.

One never knew quite what to expect and whatever happened it was always an adventure.

The bus had no heater, so one evening several senior girls decided it would be a good idea to build a fire in the aisle of the bus using old homework papers as fuel. It didn’t provide any heat, just some entertainment for a few moments.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome