The Old Henry J, Growing Up In the Fifties

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

My grandparents had given me a nineteen fifty-two Henry J for my first car, I was only fifteen so I couldn’t legally drive it on the road, but I kept that car spotless. This was in the early sixties, our lives revolved around hot good looking cars. Very seldom did a week go by when I didn’t wash it or clean it up to keep it looking nice.

In all reality, it wasn’t much of a car, but it ran and had a radio, what else did I need?

I was the only one in my group of friends that had a car, so I was top dog.

Soon, Jim  and I would be making weekly trips to Batesville in my juke box on wheels, in search of adventure, and whatever else we could find.

I started to have trouble with it, minor things; the doors wouldn’t stay closed, radiator problems and such.

One Saturday evening, we had decided the proper action would be to circle the Gibson Theater in Batesville and wait for the show to end. We reasoned that girls would come swarming out of the theater and that would be our chance to meet a couple of them. (Teenage logic.)

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

Sell Art Online

 

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

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The School Consolidation

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

The inevitable finally came to pass, there had been talk all the while  I was in school of consolidating with our arch enemies, Osgood.

Napoleon and Osgood were both small schools and as such our academic resources were limited.

Rumors of consolidation surfaced for many years and neither side wanted to give in, each wanted the school in their town and bragging rights that went with it, and because they were our fierce enemies on the basketball court, there wasn’t anyone on either side willing to give an inch.

Finally, Osgood won out only because water was available there and not in Napoleon.

The new school was soon built on the edge of Osgood, and many advantages came of it, not only on the basketball court but in academics as well.

Some minor animosity exists even today, minor grumblings are still heard at every class reunion.

Art Prints

 

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of

Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

A New Life

Art Prints

 

Written by Gary Wonning

Finally, one morning, I fed the last of what feed I had to the cattle and I had no idea what I was going to feed them that night. I didn’t say anything to dad, because I knew he was broke, and I didn’t want to worry him. I was hoping for a miracle.

Driving in the driveway after school I sensed an unusual calm. I hardly noticed, but there were no cattle near the barn, I assumed they were still out in the barren pasture. 

I walked into the house, dad met me at the door and said,”You don’t have to milk tonight, I sold the cows.”

Shocked, I replied,”That’s good, I don’t have anything to feed them anyway.”

He looked at me kind of weird and never said anything. 

Just like that, my farming days drew to a close.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Life on the Farm: Feeding The Cattle

Photography Prints

Written by Gary Wonning

As the next summer approached, it was obvious the whole family had enough of farming. As soon as his back healed, dad was planning on getting a job at the local factory. It wasn’t something he wanted to do, but it was out of necessity.

He never really said anything, but I know deep down inside, he would have much sooner been on the farm than working in a sweaty old factory.

The summer wore on, our pasture was getting shorter and shorter, and the dry summer days didn’t help provide food for our cattle. Each time I went into town to buy feed, the money became scarcer. Providing food for the cattle was becoming a real concern.

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

http://www.travelnsnap.com

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.

Dad is Disabled For a Year: Growing up in Indiana in the 50s

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Written by Gary Wonning

One day, while carrying the milk cans, dad slipped on some mud. As a result, he injured his back and he became bedfast for a year.

Suddenly the task of doing all the farming fell on my shoulders. This included putting out the crops, cultivating, putting up the hay, harvesting them and milking thirty head of cattle morning and night, as well as getting feed for them from the feed mill.

There wasn’t much choice but to jump in and do it. I didn’t mind too much, my parents needed help and I considered it a challenge to see if I could do it. All things considered, everything went as well as could be expected. I somehow managed to get the work done, have a social life, and lead the life a normal sixteen year old would and should have.

At times it was a struggle making it all work, but all in all I learned a lot and enjoyed the challenge. Actually we had too many cattle for the acreage we had. With over thirty head of cattle on sixty-five acres of farmland, it was hard to raise enough food for them, as time went on, we found ourselves buying more and more feed for them. This cut into the profits more and more, every day and we struggled to make ends meet.

The rest of the story!

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Growing Up in the 50s: A Social Life And Milking

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Sometimes it was hard to squeeze a social life into the farm scene. Going to the basketball games was a required course in school, missing a ball game was out of the question, a person could get banned from his community from such an atrocious act.

When the game was played at a school several miles from home, it was a real challenge.

There was only about forty-five minutes from the time I would arrive home from school until the bus would leave from the school to go to the game.

That didn’t leave much time for milking thirty head of cows.

But I got’er done. The stanchions held four cows and we had two milkers. So I would run two cows in, wash them, put the milkers on, feed them, bring two more in, prepare them, take the milkers off the first two and put them on the second two and repeat the process until I finished.

I could milk thirty cows in thirty minutes. At these stressed times, the cows didn’t give much milk, the milkers weren’t on long enough, and they didn’t eat much either. But they made up for it the next morning.

You couldn’t do that twice in a row or the cows would get mastitis, but when there is an emergency such as getting to a ball game, you gotta do what you gotta do.

Art Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Indiana: Surviving A Blizzard On the Farm

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

We were living on the farm on a dirt road that didn’t see much traffic.

It was always a problem in the winter when the snows set in. The only people who used our road were the people who lived on it, and there were only three, hence when the snows came, our road was one of the last to be cleared by the county workmen.

The electricity would normally go off also; this would create a real problem since we were milking about thirty head of dairy cattle and it normally became my job because dad and our closest neighbor would work day and night shoveling snow off the road so we could get out and get our milk to market.

I would start milking about eight am, finish about noon, and start in again at about one pm so I could be finished before dark. After a couple of days, I would be running out of cans to store the milk.

We drank extra milk so as not to waste it. We couldn’t get to the store to buy groceries, so drinking more milk became a viable option

It would always be several days before the milk truck could get down our road, so It was really important to get the road open as soon as possible so we could meet the milk truck on the adjoining road.

photoof waterfall

Harveys Branch near Oldenburg Indiana

Growing up on a dairy farm in southeastern Indiana, Gary traveled very little until midlife, when the opportunity became available to him.

Grabbing his camera and a bag full of equipment, he began his vision quest traveling to most areas of the United States and several countries abroad.

Along the way, he collected several thousand photographs that he wants to share with everyone.

Gary decided the best way to accomplish his goal was to publish photo documentaries on the various areas of the world he has visited.

What will follow will be several photography books, who knows how many will wind up in his collection.

To contact Gary:

journeysthrulife@gmail.com.

http://www.journeysthrulife.com.