Christmas Shopping

Written By: Gary Wonning

In those days, living in the country as we did, there were no large department stores nearby. I don’t remember ever being in a large store until I was in my teens.

Therefore, our Christmas shopping was out of a Sears and Roebuck catalog. I couldn’t wait until the Christmas catalog arrived in mid-October and would anxiously shuffle through it to find things Santa could bring. Of course, I was always threatened, if I misbehaved, Santa would bring a lump of coal, It seemed there was always someone we knew would get lumps of coal on Christmas morning instead of presents.

Relive live life in the fifties

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

photo of the Pilons

The Pilons, historic landmark in St. Lucia

The First Four Years Of School

Written By: Gary Wonning

The first four years of school, I had a bus driver who couldn’t keep any order. The bus ride became a real adventure, I was one of the youngest and not having any siblings to help me out, I became quite masterful at the art of diplomacy and became adept at staying unnoticed as to not invite the wrath of upper-class boys and girls who were bent on creating a disturbance.

One never knew quite what to expect and whatever happened it was always an adventure.

The bus had no heater, so one evening several senior girls decided it would be a good idea to build a fire in the aisle of the bus using old homework papers as fuel. It didn’t provide any heat, just some entertainment for a few moments.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Surviving The Winter Down On the Farm

Written By: Gary Wonning

To be able to go to school every day we would wait at an intersection along the highway for the school bus to arrive in the morning and dad would be there waiting for me when the bus arrived back in the evening.

It was the end of March before Santa found out where I was living. When I came home from school one evening, there in a Montgomery Ward shopping bag was my basketball lying in Grandpa’s chair waiting for me. No Christmas wrappings, I guess Santa ran out of paper.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Lost Culture Of the American Indian

Written By: Gary Wonning

The Lost Culture Of The American Indian

The American Indian, once a proud and honorable culture has succumbed to being dependent on the government for their very existence. At one time they as a whole were very independent and had a firm relationship with their Supreme Being or Their “God”.

And as such were very close and dependent on nature and the whims of the weather. They were so in tune they knew of approaching storms, hard times and stampeding buffalo. They often foretold of coming events, not only for their own personal tribes but for mankind and the earth as well.

This is not to say they were perfect, they knew little of fertilization and thus did farm out the land and when it became too depleted to raise crops, and the game had been all taken, they would move on to more fertile ground, thereby enabling the land replenish itself. They fought wars, captured slaves and committed many of the same atrocities as modern man.

The American Indian never developed any technology and thus didn’t advance their civilization one iota over ten thousand years, they were still living much the same in Columbus’s time as they were thousands of years before. This one fact eventually lead to their downfall, being big on spirituality and short on technology can only lead to disaster.

Today we have advanced to having the most technologically advanced society the modern world has ever known. We have new innovations coming at us daily, often times so rapidly it is hard to keep up. In the process, we Americans are also losing our rich culture.

Spirituality has become non-existent, many no longer practice any form of spirituality or religious belief and many times people who are so inclined are ridiculed into submission, so they remain quiet.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Humorous Side Of The Fire (Those Were the Days)

photo of the Cozumel beach

The beach at Cozumel

Written By: Gary Wonning

Besides the car ride home, the day did have its humorous moments. One of our neighbors, seeing the smoke from the house came down to investigate. Finding no one home, he began to take the washed clothes off the clothesline my mom had hung up before her nap. After he had all the clothes in his arms, he discovered there was nowhere to put them, so he hung them back up.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Our House Was Burning

Written By: Gary Wonning

Jumping in the car we sped towards home, gaining speed as we went, this was to be a wild ride. Our first hazard was a state high at the bottom of the hill on the county road we were traveling. Looking both ways and seeing nothing coming, my dad never even slowed down.

Knowing the tires on the car were not in very good condition, I asked dad if we weren’t going too fast, he never answered. Car seats or OSHA was unthought of, I was standing in the back seat hanging on for dear life. The road was unpaved and gravel was flying everywhere.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Common Sense In Today’s World

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

Written by: Gary Wonning

Common Sense

I think there is sort of a “universal” common sense, in other words, events evolve according to a natural order, certain rules apply that cannot be changed, IE , live life by a set of high ethical standards and your life normally will be better than if you live a life filled with drugs, illicit sex, and otherwise bad behavior. Develop a good economic policy either on a personal or national level and financial rewards will come to pass. Break these universal laws and disaster awaits.

However, on an individual basis, we each live in our own world, a world unlike anyone else. This uniqueness places you at a different perspective than anyone else on the planet. An entirely different perspective than even the person sitting closest to you would have.

Strange as it may seem, two people sitting next to each other will often times view the exact same event differently, and see two entirely different realities. This fact then should make sense to you that we each have an inner world specific only to one self? Each person has a unique perspective, based on life experiences, with which to view life.

photo of the Cozumel beach

The beach at Cozumel

If this doesn’t make sense to you, then it is time to review the common sense perspective, which states that no one can have more authority on what is right for you, then you! We often have the perspective that the most important answers to life’s questions come from outside ourselves. This is an erroneous assumption, because of our personal perspective, experience, and desires, only we know the best path to pursue.

This doesn’t say that we shouldn’t look to others for advice, which is healthy, we should always consider the thoughts of others in making a decision, however the final answer always comes from within.

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome