It Pays to Not Be Bored

 

Written by: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book, “Those Were The Days.”

I soon learned that if I hung around the house, mom would find something for me to do, and it was normally something I didn’t want to do, so it was best to stay outside and play. I liked to aggravate her, but I soon found out that telling her I was bored wasn’t in my best interests.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Devil’s Marbles, Sacred Aboriginal Site

Written by: Gary Wonning

In the creation story of the Dreaming, the Rainbow Serpent fashioned the earth and then returned to a spot east of the Kimberley’s at a place where the rainbow meets the earth. The Rainbow Serpent’s eggs fossilized and became what non-Aborigines now call the Devils Marbles. The Aborigines know them as Karlu Karlu.

Because of this, the Devils Marbles Conservation Reserve is a spiritually significant and sacred site to the Aborigines.

photo of devil's marbles

Devil’s Marbles, Northern Territory, Australia

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Little Johnny and the Wanted Poster

Little Johnny and the Wanted Posters

Little Johnny’s kindergarten class was on a field trip to their local police station where they saw pictures, tacked to a bulletin board, of the 10 most wanted criminals.

One of the youngsters pointed to a picture and asked if it really was the photo of a wanted person.

“Yes,” said the policeman. “The detectives want very badly to capture him.”

Little Johnny asked, “Why didn’t you keep him when you took his picture?”

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Feeding The Chickens At Grandpas

Written By: Gary Wonning

My cousin  Bob and I would sit in the corn crib and make rows in the corn cobs by shelling the corn off the cob and letting it fall to the ground.

Grandpa Huneke was always pretty thrifty and never wasted anything, so I wondered why he would let us shell the corn like this. The corn would only fall through the floor of the crib to the ground below. It seemed like a total waste to me until I looked down one day and saw all his chickens eating the corn. We were having fun and feeding his chickens at the same time.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Ayres Rock, or Uluru, in the Northern Territory of Australia

Written By: Gary Wonning

Uluru (Ayres Rock) is one of Australia’s most recognizable natural icons. The world-renowned sandstone formation stands 1,142 feet high,2,831 ft above sea level, with most of its bulk below the ground, and measures almost 6 miles in circumference. Both Uluru and Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) have great cultural significance for the Traditional landowners, who lead walking tours to inform visitors about the local flora and fauna, bush foods and the dream time stories of the area.

As the bus rumbled to a stop at the base of the giant monolith, my intuition was telling me to leave my camera gear in the bus. I had come all this way, I wasn’t going up that rock without my camera, I wanted some photos. My guides did everything possible to keep me from taking my gear, but I took it anyway.

Although the local Aborigines discourage climbing “The Rock”, many still do. For those that do, the view at the top is well worth the long climb. For those that climb, the only assistance available is a waist high chain to grab on to as one makes his way up the sometimes almost vertical path.

It was an extremely difficult climb, my right shoulder wasn’t entirely healed from the motorcycle accident, I had little strength in my right arm, as a result I needed to stop and rest every few feet.

Climbing to the top, the view is spectacular. Making one’s way across the rim, the view is breathtaking, not only in the distance but also on the rock itself.

At the top of this giant monolith, can be seen several pits and circles that were carved from the rock itself that must have been used for some ancient ceremony.

I found the pit, Hilda, my psychic had told me about the previous autumn. I lay down in it and tried to meditate, but there was too much activity surrounding me to continue. However, knowing how the universe works, I probably accomplished what I needed to. Sometimes we just need to touch base with the past.

I did take several photos while there, however, when I returned home and developed the slides, every one of them was completely black. Should have listened to my gut.

One of Uluru’s most unique features is that it appears to change color as the different light strikes it at different times of the day and year, sunset is a particularly remarkable sight when it briefly glows red. Although rainfall is uncommon in this semi-arid area, during wet periods the rock acquires a silvery-gray color, with streaks of black algae forming on the areas that serve as channels for water flow.

Special viewing areas with road access and parking have been constructed to give tourists the best views of Uluru at dawn and dusk.

As we watched the glow of Ayres Rock fade into the sunset, it was time to find our campground only a short distance away. It was well after dark when we arrived and set up camp for the evening, soon steaks were grilling on the campfire.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Life On The Farm

Written By: Gary Wonning

An excerpt from my book, Those Were the Days My Friend.

It was a good life, growing up on a farm, I often felt sorry for my cousins who lived in Indianapolis. Financially they were better off than we were, but I had animals to be around, could go fishing anytime I wanted, a creek to play in and mom and dad pretty much let me roam anywhere I wanted on the farm.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Hoosier Legend, ” Hoosiers”

Written By: Gary Wonning

Celebrations went on into the night when a team wins a big game there is an escort with fire trucks and the Sheriff leading the way, pep rallies were at the gym, congressmen, mayors, and politicians of all sorts show up, it normally lasts into the wee hours of the morning.

Because of the distance, Milan was from Hinkle Fieldhouse and the importance of the victory, officials decided to hold the celebration the next day. An estimated fifty thousand people visited this small town of fifteen hundred, just to see where it was. The crowds backed up traffic for miles.

Soon billboard-sized photos of the team began appearing in all the restaurants and public places in Milan, and of course, every male child over the age of 3 wanted to be Bobby Plump.

It had truly been a night to remember.

Fifty-five years later my high school would win the boy’s championship and seven years later the girls would win. In that part of the world, high school basketball still reigns as the king.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome