Growing Up in the 50s: A Social Life And Milking

photo fo two people, a child and an adult looking at a sunset over the ocean

Life was a lot slower and simpler in the fifties and sixties.

Written by Gary Wonning

Sometimes it was hard to squeeze a social life into the farm scene. Going to the basketball games was a required course in school, missing a ball game was out of the question, a person could get banned from his community from such an atrocious act.

When the game was played at a school several miles from home, it was a real challenge.

There was only about forty-five minutes from the time I would arrive home from school until the bus would leave from the school to go to the game.

That didn’t leave much time for milking thirty head of cows.

But I got’er done. The stanchions held four cows and we had two milkers. So I would run two cows in, wash them, put the milkers on, feed them, bring two more in, prepare them, take the milkers off the first two and put them on the second two and repeat the process until I finished.

I could milk thirty cows in thirty minutes. At these stressed times, the cows didn’t give much milk, the milkers weren’t on long enough, and they didn’t eat much either. But they made up for it the next morning.

You couldn’t do that twice in a row or the cows would get mastitis, but when there is an emergency such as getting to a ball game, you gotta do what you gotta do.

Art Prints

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

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