His Last Cookie

photo of the Olgas

The Olgas in central Australia

His Last Cookie
An elderly man lay dying in his bed. In death’s agony, he suddenly smells the aroma of his favorite chocolate chip cookies wafting up the stairs. He gathers his remaining strength and lifts himself from the bed.

Leaning against the wall, he slowly makes his way out of the bedroom, and with even greater effort forces himself down the stairs, gripping the railing with both hands.

With labored breath, he leans against the door frame, gazing into the kitchen.

Were it not for death’s agony, he would have thought himself already in heaven. There, spread out upon racks on the kitchen table, were literally hundreds of his favorite chocolate chip cookies. Was it heaven? Or was it one final act of heroic love from his devoted wife, seeing to it that he left this world a happy man?

Mustering one great final effort, he throws himself toward the table, landing on his knees in a rumpled posture. His parched lips part; the wondrous taste of the cookie was nearly in his mouth, seemingly bringing him back to life.

The aged and withered hand, shaking, makes its way to a cookie at the edge of the table — where it is suddenly smacked with a spatula by his wife. “Stay out of those!” she said. “They’re for the funeral.”

a photo of teenagers with surfboards.

The baby boomers and their impact on modern life

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Aboriginal Beliefs

photo of a termite mound

A termite mound in Queensland

Written By: Gary Wonning

Aborigines would swim in the water with crocodiles, they believe the crocodiles would only take people who had done something wrong. They still swim with crocodiles and they also believe the only time you get sick  is if you did something wrong, the head heals lives.
When someone died they were dried out, wrapped in leaves and bark, then they were taken home and put in trees.
Living and dead are a link between the present culture and its mythic logical origin.
Older paintings were said to have been done by spirits from the dream time. Mime spirits are ET’s
Aborigines are still proud, they won’t rummage through garbage or paint graffiti on a restroom.
Sacred Site, a place where aborigines find a manifestation of divine power, a sense of contact with a creative form.

With great difficulty, they are starting to move into the white society.

Learn the rest of the story!

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Aboriginal Dream Time

Written By: Gary Wonning

The aborigines believe that when we visit a place we leave an image, and a person trained to see that image can follow some one regardless of the terrain or how long they have been gone. Their teachings show many examples of such happenings, as well as casting spells on someone thousands of miles away, the victim affected by it even though he has no conscious knowledge of the spell being cast.

photo fo author meeting aboriginal boys

Blending of cultures

To the aborigine, life was all about survival, we are taught a work ethic in order to improve our lot and to make a better life. The aborigine knew no such thing, because of their extreme environment, their only focus was survival, and they don’t understand and laugh at us for working so hard.

People say to them that it must be great to live off the land, their reply is “If people think it is so great, let them try it!”

All nature is sacred, but in creation place, spirit power manifests more readily, these are places where great events of creation took place. Members of a group share a common totem, and each individual has a totem.

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Drugs and Alcohol in The Aborigine Culture

 

photo shows tow aboriginal boys

The hazards of the aboriginal peoples losing their heritage

Written by:Gary Wonning

One of the most disturbing things we saw, another photographer and I ventured down to the river and observed several children playing in the water, several hundred hypodermic needles and beer bottles were floating nearby.

Alcoholism and drug abuse is a major problem among the aborigines, they have lost their purpose in life. They have lived in the outback for thousands of years and know no other way. Regardless of how much the government helps them, they are unable to adapt.

photo of Ayres rock

The aborigines of Australia

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

A Dog Named Mace

photo of the Cozumel beach

The beach at Cozumel

A Hound Dog Named Mace

An old man lived with his hound-dog, Mace, in a run-down shack on the outskirts of town. He had no family and only a few meager possessions: a table and chair, a bed, a bag of hand tools, and his dog. He used the tools to do odd jobs in town, for which he usually would be paid enough to get food for the next day.

Mace and his master lived from one day to the next on what little these jobs would bring. The dog was just a normal hound, with one exception: while most dogs like to chew on grass occasionally, Mace loved it.
When the old man was in town, Mace would spend the day in the yard in front of the house, chewing away on the lawn.

One bright, sunny day the old man said goodbye to his dog and headed into town to work. He had a plumbing repair job in one of the homes there that would take him most of the day and would probably pay enough for food for the remainder of the week, if he managed the money carefully.

He headed for town with a spring in his step and a whistle on his lips. Inside the house and ready to start, the old man reached in the bag for his wrench. To his surprise, he didn’t feel it. He dug around again, but there didn’t seem to be any wrench. He looked in the bag, then dumped its contents on the floor, but still no wrench. Reality set in. Without a wrench he couldn’t
finish the job, and without the pay he couldn’t even buy food for that night’s supper, let alone for tomorrow. When he finally came to grips with reality, he told the lady who hired him what the situation was. While she sympathized with his situation, the job needed to be done. If the old man couldn’t do it, she would have to hire someone else.

The old man packed up his tools and headed home, head bowed and shoulders stooped. The whistle was gone and no longer was there a spring in his step. A walk that normally took 15 minutes seemed to last forever. But finally the old shack came into view, and there was Mace in the distance, munching away as usual on the lawn. When the dog saw his master, he came
running, tail wagging, telling the old man how glad he was to see him. Kneeling beside the hound, the man began to pet him, and through tear-filled eyes told the dog that there would be no supper tonight and no food for tomorrow. What’s
more, without money to buy a new wrench, he had no idea what the future held. It was the loneliest, most helpless feeling he ever had!

Then he caught a glimpse of something shining in the grass. As the old man went over to see what this piece of shining material was, his despair turned in an instant to joy! It was the wrench! The old man had dropped it on his way out that morning, and it would have been lost forever had Mace not been eating farther away from the house than he usually did! The old man
grabbed the dog, gave him a hug that almost suffocated him, and ran into the house. Reaching for a stub of pencil and the only piece of paper he had, he wrote a moving tribute to his canine companion.

Few people have ever heard these words…until now, that is. One man who did happen to read them changed them a bit and has his name recorded in music history. The old man never did get the credit he deserved. But now you are privileged to read the opening line of his original poem, which began: 
“A grazing Mace, how sweet the hound that saved a wrench for me.”

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

capiture of a ups driver making a delivery

A UPS driver making a delivery to a beautiful blonde

The Wisdom of Our Ancestors

 

photo of a purple, lavendar flower over a grey sidewalk

A beautiful flower

Written By: Gary Wonning

There is an extreme shortage of common sense in today’s world, When looking back in history, I soon discovered this has always been a problem, Benjamin Franklin once said, ”Of all the senses, common sense seems to be the one that is used the least.”

As simple as it may seem, many seem to be totally oblivious to it. Most if not all of the problems the world faces today could be solved if people would just sit back and think about what would seem to be the most obvious and simple solution to any issue. Often times people tend to over complicate the issues, when an easy and simple solution would be obvious.

I often think back to what my parents and grandparents believed and said, at the time I thought they were totally out of their mind and ignored it. I now wish I would have listened and followed their advice more often.

photo of a distinguished older gentleman

Wisdom lost through the ages, common sense is no longer common.

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Welcome to Belize

 

photo of a little Mayan girl

A little girl carrying water back to the village

Written by; Gary Wonning

A native Belizian, almost 7 feet tall, greeted us as we pulled up in front of our humble abode, a two-story house with a picket fence in front. Immediately he asked where we were from after I had responded I was from Indiana I was surprised when he asked me if I knew Bobby Knight. I had seen a flurry of basketball goals on the way from the airport, it seems as if the modern day Mayas are still obsessed with basketball, as their ancestors practiced a rudimentary form of the sport centuries ago.

His second question set us back a little, “Do you want to buy any drugs?” Not being one that engages in that sort of activity, “No thanks.” was the reply. One can only imagine the quality of the jails in this tiny country. We had been warned that the same people who would try to sell us drugs, would also turn the buyer into the local authorities, thus earning a reward, getting the drugs back and re-selling them again to the next victim.

YOUR FAVORITE ONLINE MAYAN STORE

The accommodations at our bed and breakfast, The Fort Street Hotel, were adequate, complete with a community bathroom. One soon learned to knock and holler before entering. Hemingway is reputed to have stayed here, but just as George Washington is said to have stayed at every house in New England, so Hemingway is said to have stayed in many places. In both cases , much of it is true. Settling in for the evening , dinner was the first thing on the agenda, Red Snapper wrapped in a banana leaf, with all the trimmings and a quart sized Margarita seemed to be a decent way to start our little adventure. Might as well enjoy the evening, tomorrow we venture out into the hinterland, hard to envision what adventure might await us in the land of the Maya.

photo of a Mayan Pyramid

An interesting photo book about the Maya Indians of central America

The author has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome