We Tried To Make The World A Better Place

We tried so hard to make things better for our kids that we made them worse.  For my grandchildren, I’d like better.  I’d really like for them to know about hand-me-down clothes and homemade ice cream and leftover meat loaf sandwiches.  I really would.

I hope you learn humility by being humiliated, and that you learn honesty by being cheated.  I hope you learn to make your own bed and mow the lawn and wash the car.  And I really hope nobody gives you a brand-new car when you are sixteen.

It will be good if at least one time you can see puppies born and your old dog put to sleep.  I hope you get a black eye fighting for something you believe in.  I hope you have to share a bedroom with your younger brother.  And it’s all right if you have to draw a line down the middle of the room, but when he wants to crawl under the covers with you because he’s scared, I hope you let him.

When you want to see a movie and your little brother wants to tag along, I hope you’ll let him.  I hope you have to walk uphill to school with your friends and that you live in a town where you can do it safely.  On rainy days when you have to catch a ride, I hope you don’t ask your driver to drop you two blocks away so you won’t be seen riding with someone as uncool as your mom.

If you want a slingshot, I hope your dad teaches you how to make one instead of buying one.  I hope you learn to dig in the dirt and read books.

When you learn to use computers, I hope you also learn to add and subtract in your head.  I hope you get teased by your friends when you have your first crush on a girl, and when you talk back to your mother that you learn what ivory soap tastes like.

May you skin your knee climbing a mountain, burn you hand on a stove and stick your tongue on a frozen flagpole.  I don’t care if you try a beer once, but I hope you don’t like it.  And if a friend offers you dope or a joint, I hope you realize he is not your friend.

I sure hope you make time to sit on a porch with your Grandpa and go fishing with your Uncle.  May you feel sorrow at a funeral and joy during the holidays.  I hope your mother punishes you when you throw a baseball through your neighbor’s window and that she hugs you and kisses you at Christmas time when you give her a plaster mold of your hand.

These things I wish for you–tough times and disappointment, hard work and happiness.  To me, it’s the only way to appreciate life.

Paul Harvey. . . GOOD DAY!

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Quinkan County: Queensland Australia

Written by: Gary Wonning

Quinkan County was named after the Aboriginal spirits or ”Quinkans” who inhabit the sandstone bluffs at White Horse Gallery. This gallery contains the world’s most significant rock art displays.

photo, aborigine boy

Cooinda at morning sun.

Four fun filled evenings were spent here during my walkabout, listening to tribal elders, fellow travelers, locals, and drunks all spinning their stories! (The tribal elders, were believable!)

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

The Times Are Changing

 

Written By: Gary Wonning

We are the ones we have been waiting for.

These are the times the Hopi, Maya, and others spoke of.

These are the times of endings and new beginnings.
Many believe the world will someday come to an end. The reality is, someday it will, many millions of years from now when none of us living today will be around to see it, at least not in this lifetime.

The reality is,  the present time isn’t going to end, neither is civilization. Since the beginning of time, humanity has been looking forward to the end of the world. There is something in our human DNA that prevents us from envisioning life going on forever, we are always looking for the end, life is cyclical, it never ends.

In the present reality, we are in the end times, the end of one era and the beginning of another. As the popular song of the seventies so eloquently stated, We are leaving the age of Pisces and entering the age of Aquarius.

Sorry to say, humanity isn’t ending, our way of thinking is, we are entering a new era of consciousness where we will become more aware, not only of our physical existence but the nonphysical one as well.

As a whole, humanity is evolving towards a time when many souls will become more enlightened than they have been in the past, many are becoming able to tune into their innermost thoughts and act on their instincts rather than raw emotions.

They are now more enabled to instinctively know what others are thinking and feeling, others thoughts and motives are becoming known to us so they will no longer be able to mislead us thru their words and actions.

As a result, people will need to be more honest in both their thoughts and actions, politicians and others will no longer be able to hide their true intentions, leading to a society that is more open and able to function as it should. People will slowly become aware that they do control their destiny and are able to determine what future they would like, by passing karma in the process.

In time, this will lead to increased prosperity and content on the planet earth.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

 

The Entitlement Generation

Written by: Gary Wonning

Much has been said in recent years about the younger generation being the “Entitlement” generation.

This certainly doesn’t allude to everyone in this generation, there are many fine young people in the world today, people who will carry the weight and lead us into the future, but regretfully, many young people have been lead astray.

They have been called snowflakes, cupcakes and other such terms to illustrate the tender state of their feelings and emotions. They can’t seem to handle any amount of stress whatsoever.

Anything that doesn’t go their way and give them what they want sends many of them into emotional shock, resulting in crying, emotional outbursts or flocking to the streets to decry some great social injustice.

The general consensus is that what has caused this is they were raised to expect a trophy just for showing up in life, they didn’t have to do anything, just be there.

Many have never been told “No”, and have never experienced rejection, they have been shielded from every negative event that has ever crossed their path and thus have no coping skills.

While most of this is true, they cannot keep blaming their parents and society for their misconceptions.

As a human soul, they knew full well at birth what they were getting into, they volunteered to experience the life they have now, to learn lessons needed for the advancement of their soul. We all have free will, that free will covers every phase of our life, not just deciding if we are going to have a hot fudge sundae or a pizza. You can’t decide not to have free will.

They were born into life situations that would benefit them and enable them to experience challenges necessary for their continued growth.

Their ancestors, for the most part, had good intentions. Many grew up in a time when material possessions were few and far between. They grew up fighting wars and poverty. When the prosperity boom of the sixties came about, they seized the opportunity to provide a life for their families no one even envisioned was possible.

Along with it, most still maintained the spiritual values taught them by their ancestors. Over time, those values began to fade away, not so much by the previous generation, but by the one’s who followed. soon they were forgotten.

With this degradation of the values that made us great, it suddenly became fashionable to treat everyone fairly and not hurt someone’s feelings, to treat everyone like a winner.

The everyone’s a winner mentality is what has brought about the current dilemma.

It’s past time to abandon this philosophy and go back to teaching the core values that are more likely to bring about a happy and successful life.

The sooner the entitled generation realizes it is their responsibility to fix their own life, regardless of the circumstances that lead to their current situation the sooner they will begin to lead a happier life.

They volunteered to experience the events they are going through, they can’t blame someone else forever.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.Your comments are welcome

The Gift of Change

The Gift of Change an excerpt Marianne Williamson

Posted: 17 Aug 2016 11:48 AM PDT

Life as we knew it is passing away, and something new is emerging to take its place.

All of us are playing a part in a larger transformative process, as each of us is being forced to confront whatever it is we do, or even think, that keeps love at bay. For as we block love’s power to change our own lives, we block its power to change the world.

Humanity is moving forward now, though in some ways we are doing so kicking and screaming. Nature seems to be saying to all of us, “Okay, it’s time. No more playing around. Become the person you were meant to be.”

We would like to, but it’s hard. The problems of the world today seem larger than they have ever been before, making it easy to succumb to cynicism, fear, hopelessness, and despair. Until, that is, we remember who we are.

For who we really are is a power bigger than all our problems, both personal and collective. And when we have remembered who we are, our problems — which are literally nothing other than manifestations of our forgetfulness — will disappear.

Well that would be a miracle, you might say. And that is precisely the point.

This book is about learning who we are, that we might become agents of miraculous change. As we release the fear-based thoughts we’ve been taught to think by a frightened and frightening world, we see God’s truth revealed: that who we are at our core is love itself. And miracles occur naturally as expressions of love.

It is said in Alcoholics Anonymous that every problem comes bearing its own solution. And the gift being borne by our current challenges is the opportunity to make a large leap forward in the actualization of our own potential. The only way the world can make a quantum leap, from conflict and fear to peace and love, is if that same quantum leap occurs within us. Then and only then will we become the men and women capable of solving the problems that plague us. As we leap into the zone of our most authentic selves, we enter a realm of infinite possibility.

Until we enter that zone, we are blocked, for God cannot do for us what He cannot do through us. To say He has the solutions to our problems is to say He has a plan for the changes each of us needs to go through in order to become the people through whom He can bring forth those solutions. The most important factor in determining what will happen in our world is what you decide to let happen within you. Every circumstance — no matter how painful — is a gauntlet thrown down by the universe, challenging us to become who we are capable of being. Our task, for our own sakes and for the sake of the entire world, is to do so.

Yet for us to become who we most deeply want to be, we must look at who we are now — even when what we see doesn’t please us. This moment is driving us to face every issue we’ve ever avoided facing, compelling us to get to some rock-bottom, essential truth about ourselves whether we like what we see there or not.

And until we make that breakthrough in ourselves, there will be no fundamental breakthrough in the world. The world we see reflects the people we’ve become, and if we do not like what we see in the world, we must face what we don’t like within ourselves. Having done so, we will move through our personal darkness to the light that lies beyond. We will embrace the light and extend the light.

And as we change, the world will change with us.

We spend so much time on unimportant things — things with no ultimate meaning — yet for reasons no one seems to fully understand, such nonessentials stand at the center of our worldly existence. They have no connection to our souls whatsoever, yet they have attached themselves to our material functioning. Like spiritual parasites, they eat away our life force and deny us our joy. The only way to rid ourselves of their pernicious effects is to walk away … not from things that need to get done, but from thoughts that need to die.

Crossing the bridge to a better world begins with crossing a bridge inside our minds, from the addictive mental patterns of fear and separation, to enlightened perceptions of unity and love. We’re in the habit of thinking fearfully, and it takes spiritual discipline to turn that around in a world where love is more suspect than fear.

To achieve a miraculous experience of life, we must embrace a more spiritual perspective. Otherwise, we will die one day without ever having known the real joy of living. That joy emerges from the experience of our true being — when we detach from other people’s projections onto us, when we allow ourselves permission to dream our greatest dreams, when we’re willing to forgive ourselves and others, when we’re willing to remember that we were born with one purpose:  to love and be loved.

Anyone who looks at the state of the world today is aware that something radically new is called for — in who we are as a species and in our relationship to each other and our relationship to the earth itself. Yet the psychological fundamentals that hold this dysfunctional world in place are like sacred cows: we are afraid to touch them, for fear something bad will happen to us if we do. In fact, something bad will happen to us if we do not. It is time to change. It is time to do what we know in our hearts we were born to do.

We are here to participate in a glorious subversion of the world’s dominant, fear-based thought forms.

There are only two core emotions:  love and fear.  And love is to fear as light is to darkness: in the presence of one, the other disappears. . . .

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Do Cats Go To Heaven

Do Cats Go to Heaven?

A cat dies and goes to Heaven. God meets him at the gate and says, “You have been a good cat all of these years. Anything you desire is yours, all you have to do is ask.”

The cat says, “Well, I lived all my life with a poor family on a farm and had to sleep on hardwood floors.”God says,
“Say no more.” And instantly, a fluffy pillow appears.

A few days later, 6 mice are killed in a tragic accident and they go to Heaven. God meets them at the gate with the
same offer that He made the cat. The mice said, “All our lives we’ve had to run. Cats, dogs and even women with
brooms have chased us. If we could only have a pair of roller skates, we wouldn’t have to run anymore.”

God says, “Say no more.” And instantly, each mouse is fitted with a beautiful pair of tiny roller skates.

About a week later, God decides to check and see how the cat is doing. The cat is sound asleep on his new pillow.
God gently wakes him and asks, “How are you doing?
Are you happy here?”

The cat yawns and stretches and says, “Oh, I’ve never been happier in my life. And those Meals on Wheels you’ve been sending over are the best!”

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome

Raising Turkeys

Written By: Gary Wonning

After we started raising turkeys, the manure which is rich in nitrogen and smells of ammonia, greatly enhanced the soil. As a result, the corn yield increased to around a hundred bushels per acre. That was quite an improvement from the early years.

The young chick turkeys were housed inside until they were about four months old. The houses they were living in were equipped with wire flooring so the droppings could fall below where they were walking. This made for a very slippery surface and resulted in some interesting situations when it was time to catch them and put them out on range.

The turkeys were caught individually, so there was much slipping and sliding while performing this function. When I got a little older, I was allowed to help, which I thought was big stuff, until one night as I lunged for a turkey, I slipped and only grabbed one of the turkey’s legs. The other leg swung around and the turkey claws made a large gash across my right cheek.

It healed after a time, but for years, every time I exercised a lot and my face became red, the scar would be visible.

Gary has been a writer/photographer for over thirty years. Specializing in nature and landscape photography, as well as studying native cultures.

His travels have taken him to most of the United States, as well as Australia, Belize, Egypt and the Canary Islands.

He has studied the Mayan culture of Central America as well as the aborigines of Australia. Photography has given him the opportunity to observe life in various parts of the world.

He has published several books about his adventures.

For more information, please consult his website,www.journeysthrulife.com.

Your comments are welcome